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Discussion Starter #1
So it looks like I'll be on a few panels at Worldcon next month. Still haven't found anyone to share a table with <hint, hint>

Anyway, it'll be my first time being a guest on a panel. I've been to dozens (hundreds?) of panels but I've never been behind a table before. Does anyone have any advice, suggestions, tips, prayers to offer me? Also, some of these panels seem like real heady stuff. I should research but I'm not sure how.

Any piece of advice from the mundane to the outrageous will be helpful.

Thanks
 

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I've only done a couple of panels at small cons before, so I don't know that I'm qualified to give advice .. but that's never stopped me before.

I suggest you have your own cheat-sheet for each panel with a list of points you want to cover.
For the panels I was involved with, there was an earlier meeting with the other panelists just to make sure we weren't all intending to bring up the exact same examples/points. There was an informal agreement not to hog the entire panel, to let other panelists have a chance to speak, etc. Also an agreement on whether to take questions during or after.
This was over 15 years ago, btw, so I'm struggling to remember anything else.

Lastly, have fun ;-)

 

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Do a little research on the panel topic and your fellow panel mates/moderator. Use notecards or some form of note device so that it's in front of you if you're not strong at winging an answer. Bring a bottle of water and try to remember to speak slowly and clearly. People have a tendency to talk faster when on stage or in front of a crowd.

And have fun. The audience is there to listen and to learn (usually).
 

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Mark Gardner said:
So the panel is about to start and Kevin Ikenberry is like, "Where's Gardner?" Scalzi scans the audience, and points me out. "He's in the audience!" The audience turns in unison to stare at me, and I waved and went up on stage. It totally set the tone for the panel, and I had a lot of fun. Plus, it forced Scalzi to up his game.
You know Sclazi? Neat.
 

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Mark Gardner said:
To me, prestige is not something to hoard, it's something to spread around, because inevitably, you will need someone to do the same for you regardless of where you are along the path.
Very true and definitely worth paying it forward.
 

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Simon Haynes said:
I've only done a couple of panels at small cons before, so I don't know that I'm qualified to give advice .. but that's never stopped me before.

I suggest you have your own cheat-sheet for each panel with a list of points you want to cover.
For the panels I was involved with, there was an earlier meeting with the other panelists just to make sure we weren't all intending to bring up the exact same examples/points. There was an informal agreement not to hog the entire panel, to let other panelists have a chance to speak, etc. Also an agreement on whether to take questions during or after.
This was over 15 years ago, btw, so I'm struggling to remember anything else.

Lastly, have fun ;-)
I've only been on a few panels, but this sounds like good advice. The conventions I've attended usually have moderators for each panel, also, who will help with keeping people on topic and intervene (ideally) if someone does start to 'hog the panel.'
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the help everyone. I hope it goes well but I don't know. I'm great at interviews and at being one on one even though I hate being the center of attention. I think sitting down is what's going to kill me. I prefer to stand and walk around and to be animated.

Also, when you say you meet before hand, do you meet outside or in the room 10-15 minutes before hand? I don't know how that works or what the moderator looks like.
 
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