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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to remember the title of a book that's several years old, about a house that had more rooms inside than would be possible based on the exterior dimensions.  Maybe even with doors to rooms that appeared & disappeared.

Seeing comments on the board recently about Tardis reminded me of it.  Does anyone know the title/author? 

It would be horror or fantasy genre, & as I recall was not by a major author (or at least, one that I recognized), but may be considered a cult classic. I didn't get into it the first time around, but was thinking of tackling it again if available on Kindle.

Thanks for your help!
 

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I'd love to know what this is.  I recently walked into a pet store, in real life, that I swear was bigger on the inside than it looked outside.  Of course, I know that is probably not true, but it sure seemed that way.
 

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There was a science fiction short I read a long time ago about a tesseract -- a 4 dimensional house. The analogy was using perspective to draw a three dimensional object on a 2 dimensional piece of paper. They used 4th dimension perspective to build a 4 dimensional house in 3 dimensions.

It was, as I recall, way cool until there was an earthquake and it collapsed.

I'm thinking it was Heinlein -- Yes: "And He Built a Crooked House" in the collection The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The book I had was very long, not a short story.
 

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Was it The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski???? http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0375703764/ref=nosim/completereview

Blurb:

"Danielewski's eccentric and sometimes brilliant debut novel is really two novels, hooked together by the Nabokovian trick of running one narrative in footnotes to the other. One-the horror story-is a tour-de-force. Zampano, a blind Angelino recluse, dies, leaving behind the notes to a manuscript that's an account of a film called The Navidson Report. In the Report, Pulitzer Prize-winning news photographer Will Navidson and his girlfriend move with their two children to a house in an unnamed Virginia town in an attempt to save their relationship. One day, Will discovers that the interior of the house measures more than its exterior. More ominously, a closet appears, then a hallway. Out of this intellectual paradox, Danielewski constructs a viscerally frightening experience. Will contacts a number of people, including explorer Holloway Roberts, who mounts an expedition with his two-man crew. They discover a vast stairway and countless halls. The whole structure occasionally groans, and the space reconfigures, driving Holloway into a murderous frenzy. The story of the house is stitched together from disparate accounts, until the experience becomes somewhat like stumbling into Borges's Library of Babel. This potentially cumbersome device actually enhances the horror of the tale, rather than distracting from it. Less successful, however, is the second story unfolding in footnotes, that of the manuscript's editor, (and the novel's narrator), Johnny Truant. Johnny, who discovered Zampano's body and took his papers, works in a tattoo parlor. He tracks down and beds most of the women who assisted Zampano in preparing his manuscript. But soon Johnny is crippled by panic attacks, bringing him close to psychosis. In the Truant sections, Danielewski attempts an Infinite Jest-like feat of ventriloquism, but where Wallace is a master of voices, Danielewski is not. His strength is parodying a certain academic tone and harnessing that to pop culture tropes. Nevertheless, the novel is a surreal palimpsest of terror and erudition, surely destined for cult status. (Mar.) "
 

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The OP's description of the house puts me in mind of Charles DeLint's Newford Stories ... there are several novels and short story collections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Paul Jones is correct - House of Leaves.  I'd forgotten about the format of the book (footnotes, margin notes, etc.) & it's not on Kindle & would probably be hard , if not impossible, to read electronically. 

If you're into involved horror stories & don't mind DTBs, you might want to try it!

I'm going to check on the other authors mentioned, so thanks, everyone.
 

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valleycat1 said:
Paul Jones is correct - House of Leaves. I'd forgotten about the format of the book (footnotes, margin notes, etc.) & it's not on Kindle & would probably be hard , if not impossible, to read electronically.

If you're into involved horror stories & don't mind DTBs, you might want to try it!

I'm going to check on the other authors mentioned, so thanks, everyone.
That's my good deed for the day done. Now I can go back to being awful to people. ::)
 

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Yes, House of Leaves is great but no way it could work on Kindle that I can see...

And Ann - The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag - I've literally been trying to remember that book for months; I read it as a kid but lost it somewhere along the line. I could remember the cover, I could remember it was Heinlein, but couldn't remember the title for the life of me! So thanks...

James
 
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