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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there

I really believe that my book would make a great film for either TV or the screen because of its locations, era, history and content and I’m wondering if anyone else has had the same thought about their book and, in fact, done it?  If so, do you have any advice you can give me before I get started or can you recommend a book that will help me through the process.  There's a few books on Amazon about writing for film and tv but I'd like a recommendation to help me choose one.

Thanks
Marie
 

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My publisher, Authorhouse, has offered to do all the work to make my manuscript ready for TV/Film. They offer this as a service then post it for film directors to buy the script.

Check out www.authorhouse.com

Nicholas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
nicholasmcgirr said:
My publisher, Authorhouse, has offered to do all the work to make my manuscript ready for TV/Film. They offer this as a service then post it for film directors to buy the script.

Check out www.authorhouse.com

Nicholas.
What a service!! I'll check it out. Have you personally taken up that option?

Thank you :)
 

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No, I haven't. Not really my bag. They do press for the sale though, so beware.

Nicholas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the caution.

Marie
 

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Content removed circa September 2018 after realizing this forum was bought by VerticalScope -- a foreign corporation with seemingly suspicious motives and a bad attitude apparently attempting to grab rights retroactively. They can have the rights to this statement!
 

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Crenel said:
. Allowing someone to use your book as the basis for a script is a privilege they should pay for, not a service you should pay for.
I couldn't agree more, that's EXACTLY why I didn't agree to their sales pitch. I offered the website just because I knew they offered it. Let's face it, most publishers (especially those for self published authors) are willing to sell just about any type of service they think that we will bite at. Very well said.

Nicholas.
 

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A number of us KB'ers are ex pat screenwriters turned novelists.  Believe it or not, screenwriting is an even tougher field to break into than traditional publishing. 
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Crenel said:
There are some very insightful blogs about script writing from people who are in the movie industry and I highly recommend spending some reading time on those blogs before buying something that perhaps somebody should pay you for. Here's one to get started, and check out the other blogs linked from it: http://thebitterscriptreader.blogspot.com/
That's great information and advice. I'll check the blogs out.
Thanks a lot
Marie
 

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I used to be a TV writer. Lately, I've been working for Vast Entertainment. Vast specializes in getting books to screen. (You can check out the website for projects in production).

However, if your book is historical, you have a tough, tough road to slog. Character-driven, period pieces... fiction really is your best bet.

The books we're looking for (as is most of Hollywood) are high-concept, contemporary, with an interesting twist. And that's tough enough to place -- which is surprising. There's lots of layers of "no" to get through. And usually authors don't get to write their own scripts. It's very, very rare that anything like that happens. An author that insists on it, is usually a deal-breaker. Unless it's someone like Stephen King.

What I like about finding indy authors to push, is that they own their film rights, they're generally sane, they understand the business aspect and they work hard. So, while my boss checks the legacy market, I look at indy's. Although I'm hugely backlogged right now, because I'm spread too thin and I read everything myself.

If you want to check out a helpful forum, Craig Mazin runs Artful Writer. Although it can be brutal in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sophrosyne said:
I used to be a TV writer. Lately, I've been working for Vast Entertainment. Vast specializes in getting books to screen. (You can check out the website for projects in production).

However, if your book is historical, you have a tough, tough road to slog. Character-driven, period pieces... fiction really is your best bet.

The books we're looking for (as is most of Hollywood) are high-concept, contemporary, with an interesting twist. And that's tough enough to place -- which is surprising. There's lots of layers of "no" to get through. And usually authors don't get to write their own scripts. It's very, very rare that anything like that happens. An author that insists on it, is usually a deal-breaker. Unless it's someone like Stephen King.

What I like about finding indy authors to push, is that they own their film rights, they're generally sane, they understand the business aspect and they work hard. So, while my boss checks the legacy market, I look at indy's. Although I'm hugely backlogged right now, because I'm spread too thin and I read everything myself.

If you want to check out a helpful forum, Craig Mazin runs Artful Writer. Although it can be brutal in there.
I'm having second thoughts about writing it myself already - just after these few postings :) I'll check out the forum.

Thanks for commenting - it's very helpful.

Marie
 

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A number of people have said my first book would make an excellent film and I think my agent is going to push that side of things for me. Fingers crossed.

@Nicholas, I know you have your head srewed on, but please be careful with Authorhouse, I've heard nothing but bad reports about them taking vast amounts off writers. Try searching on google and see what pops up.

;)
 

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Crenel said:
I'm not familiar with Authorhouse but I would recommend being very careful about protecting your rights (and money). Something about treating the adaptation of a book to a script as a service sounds sketchy to me. Allowing someone to use your book as the basis for a script is a privilege they should pay for, not a service you should pay for. Again, without knowing the details of what they offer, it sounds more likely to prey on author's desires to have their books adapted than something really connected to how movies are really made.
This.

Film adaptations are an important subsidiary right of the author.
 

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Preditors and Editors says this about Authorhouse:

AuthorHouse (formerly 1st Books): Not recommended. A vanity publisher. A division of Author Solutions.

5/17/06 - If you don't know by now, AuthorHouse lost a libel suit in court. It seems that the courts and jury decided a publisher couldn't disavow itself of what it published. In other words, AuthorHouse should have vetted what it accepted before publishing. Now they owe several hundred thousand dollars and may have to pay even more in punitive damages.

On a side note, the vast majority of authors don't write their own screenplays. They sell the rights to someone to create the film. Usually agents do this. Your best bet for a film adaptation of your book is to promote and sell a TON of books and attract an agent.

Vicki
 

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Screenplays are highly structured and everything you write must be visual. Lew Hunter's Screenwriting 434 is a fabulous primer.

I wrote an award-winning screenplay (won $5,000). Still waiting for it to sell ;) if it ever does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Victorine said:
On a side note, the vast majority of authors don't write their own screenplays. They sell the rights to someone to create the film. Usually agents do this. Your best bet for a film adaptation of your book is to promote and sell a TON of books and attract an agent.

Vicki
Yep...I think you're right Vicki. It was good to get some advice before I wasted time on trying to write the screenplay.

Thanks everyone :)
Marie
 

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Marie, I worked as a screenwriter for ten years before I switched to writing novels, and I've also worked in film development. I really do not recommend that you adapt your own novel as a screenplay UNLESS you have sources of independent financing to approach with your finished script. You need an agent or manager to sell your book instead (easier said than done, but that's the truths of it). Many more books than scripts are bought and optioned for film development).

Here's a link to a blog I did about screenwriting that may clear up some misconceptions that most people seem to have about the business.

http://thedarksalon.blogspot.com/2007/12/so-you-want-to-know-about-screenwriting_31.html
 

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ukdame said:
Hi there

I really believe that my book would make a great film for either TV or the screen because of its locations, era, history and content and I'm wondering if anyone else has had the same thought about their book and, in fact, done it? If so, do you have any advice you can give me before I get started or can you recommend a book that will help me through the process. There's a few books on Amazon about writing for film and tv but I'd like a recommendation to help me choose one.

Thanks
Marie
Yes, I am 100% confident mine would translate to a screenplay and have been told so a lot, but I wouldn't want to tackle it as I have no experience in writing screenplays and agents are just as strict with them as - if not moreso than - with novel submissions. For example, I'd need to know how much screen time a scene would use, directions, setting, cues...bleh.

This is a good, comprehensive site: http://www.screenwriting.info/
 

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Screenwriting is hard. It's a very precise format.

While it's fun to dream, I wouldn't go there unless you're prepared to dedicate yourself to the craft and the long haul of trying to drum up interest.



 
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