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The Godfather (well into the book before there's any real tension, and don't tell me about the court scene, because that's not TENSE)

Moby Dick (Nothing happens for the first 3/4 of the book)

Dune (Longest lead in I've ever seen.)

What else?
 

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I see people complaining in reviews that The Life of Pi is slow to begin. I've only read a page but it was fascinating: It was about sloths, which I guess is about as slow as you can get. But I like sloths so the opening is fine with me.
 

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I must be tired.  By the subject line I thought you were calling us book ho's.  :eek:
 

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Amera said:
Probably everything written before the 1980s, possibly earlier. ;)
I'm going to second this.

I even have trouble watching my favorite movies made before the 1980s because they seem so slow now.
 

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A lot of older books are slow to get to the meat of the book because the writers were getting paid by the word, thus making their works quite long-winded with lots of side plots that really did not add to the book.  I'm thinking The Count of Monte Cristo as a perfect example, even though I love the story.  As for today's books, I heard about the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo for years before finally picking it up and trying it and it was very "meh" until about page 100, then I was hooked.
 

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Cherise Kelley said:
I'm going to second this.

I even have trouble watching my favorite movies made before the 1980s because they seem so slow now.
There's a fair amount of literature/commentary on the general subject, but one of my favorite is probably the Red Letter Media review of the newest Star Trek movie. Whatever your thoughts on the original Star Trek movie from the 70s, it's almost impossible for a studio to make that kind of slow-moving, thought-exercise film anymore. With digital media creators are competing against everything ever made rather than just "what is on TV/the theatre" right now and so it has almost inevitably led to more explosions, faster pacing, and less plot.

I like to call it the Michael Bay effect.
 

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People nowadays are far too impatient.
I love books that guide you slowly into the world, give you time to get to know people and let the story gain momentum.
I don't like books where the MC gets shot at by drunken ninjas in the first sentence, is climbing naked through the window in the second, and is running through a wood, in a hail storm, when suddenly seven tigers jump out of the trees while he is dodging a poisonous arrow in the third.
And in heaven's name, tell me things. Don't try to show them. If I want to be shown things, I'll watch a movie. ::)
 

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Andrew Ashling said:
I don't like books where the MC gets shot at by drunken ninjas in the first sentence, is climbing naked through the window in the second, and is running through a wood, in a hail storm, when suddenly seven tigers jump out of the trees while he is dodging a poisonous arrow in the third.
I am quite confused as to how you got your hands on a copy of my current work...
 

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If the only way to start a book that has a chance of selling is with frenetic pacing, it's a sad statement on many things -- intellectual depth of readers, originality of writers, and much more. In the long run, I'd rather write pacing that matches the story, and write for a deeper audience than a more shallow one, even if these choices consign my work to permanent obscurity. I won't be happy with a dumbed-down work, and if I'm not happy with what I write, there's no point writing it.
 
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