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From The Passive Voice: http://www.thepassivevoice.com/03/2013/bookshop-browsing-vital-for-publishing-research-finds/

"The single most effective technique for dismantling the physical book sector would be to accelerate the closure of bookshops," said McCabe. "We estimate that when a bookshop closes, about a third of its sales transfer to another bookshop. This means as much as two-thirds of sales disappear. Some of this spend doubtless migrates online, but much of it vanishes from the book sector entirely."
However, the research showed a higher number of books being bought from internet-only businesses than from bricks-and-mortar stores for the first time in 2012.
 
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Articles like this are a good reminder to those of us that are highly connected that much of the population is still not online. 40% of the U.S. still doesn't have access to broadband either because it is unaffordable or it does not even exist as an option where they live. 20% of U.S. adults still don't use the internet at all. For all the size of Amazon, for some genres it isn't where the readers are. And the U.K. is allegedly more connected than the U.S. in terms of broadband adoption.
 

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The United States is a country defined not by its urban sectors, but by its vast stretches of terrain. There are spots in the west containing huge tracts of land still demarcated into the original post Native American-settlement lots. Working for a long-haul trucking company really opened my eyes. You'd have an agent call in from somewhere, and they'd be harping about how slow their satellite internet access was that day.
 

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I happened to be in a brick and mortar bookstore today (in an urban area with available broadband) and there were several people coming in to special order books. Eve in the age of the internet, the brick and mortar world still exists and there are people who don't order books online (or don't know that they can).
 

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Actually, looking rather closely at some of the statements, the "necessity" of bookstore browsing is questionable.

...the research showed a higher number of books being bought from internet-only businesses than from bricks-and-mortar stores for the first time in 2012.
And this rather made me smile:

The survey found bookshops were stronger than Amazon in genres including religion and MBS, business books, art, computing and fitness/diet books.
I don't think that list of genres is going to make me panic, not that those genres aren't important to the people who write and buy them. :)
 

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Our big bookstore closed about 10 years ago. We have a mini BAM where there is less space for books than there for chairs, lattes, and children's toys. I was rather resentfully forced to chance how I shopped for books. Also b/c they didn't carry some stuff in this area. I had to order books from Amazon. The kindle was a godsend. Now, the only reason I go to BAM is to buy Webkinz and Frozen Hot Cocoa.
 
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