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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading where ebooks were becoming big in libraries and I was just wondering if libraries can get kindle ebooks from Amazon? And, if so, do we get paid just as we normally do when they do?

Dee
 

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Well, they can, in theory, but really the answer is no, and no, and also no. They don't buy from Amazon.

If you want to be in libraries, you need to be at library distributors, like Overdrive, and also pay-per checkout apps like Libby and Hoopla and a few others.

You access these through D2D and Kobo and Smashwords, and when a library buys your book, they typically pay a premium price, which you set. D2D and Kobo suggest 3x the normal price.

For audio, you need to be at Findaway Voices which distributes to a lot of libraries and library apps and other subscription sites like Scribd.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The reason I asked is because I read this about Amazon signing a deal to let libraries to get kindles:


Maybe it's just their publishing titles. I just figured someone knew a little something more about it.

Dee
 

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Amazon Publishing (Apub) is not KDP. And the DPLA isn't really about getting into libraries through their usual distribution channels. The DPLA is more or less a centralized location for archival material. I have no idea why the DPLA and APub are working together, it's not a partnership I would have put on the top of my list. While one of the missions of the DPLA is to create a distribution network for libraries that is controlled by libraries (Baker, Hoopla, Overdrive and the others are not driven by libraries), their main focus seems to be more about cultural heritage, which is why they have partnerships with the Smithsonian, Library of Congress, and several other important archives.

This is the marketplace that I am assuming is part of Apub's deal: Palace Marketplace

Apub books aren't in bookstores, they aren't on the lists, they aren't winning awards, and they aren't in libraries because they haven't been available through the normal channels most libraries use. Working out a deal with the DPLA is a way to at least cross one item off that list, even if it doesn't appear to have the market share of libraries that some of the other distributors have.
 

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The reason I asked is because I read this about Amazon signing a deal to let libraries to get kindles:


Maybe it's just their publishing titles. I just figured someone knew a little something more about it.

Dee
Yeah, that's for their imprints. Amazon wouldn't be making library deals for indie authors. It's the indies' responsibility to make their books available to libraries.
 

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I'm not understanding the Amazon NO, No, and No, on libraries buying Kindle eBooks. Because of my failing eyesight, I'm forced to do all my book reading on my Kindle. The Sacrament Public Library has 1000s of Kindle eBooks available to checkout for three weeks. Since I can't have my eBooks on KU if I use D2D to be able to sell to libraries, I'm in a catch 22. Amazon must have a vehicle to sell Kindle eBooks to libraries, and I doubt they would force Authors to use Overdrive and dump their KU participation.
 

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There are many reasons why Amazon and other retailers do not work with libraries. One, what's in it for them? Nothing. We all know Amazon's philosophy. If they had some deal with libraries, they would be sending readers away from the Amazon site to another site (which is a big no-no for Amazon). Also, how would an indie get paid from this arrangement? Authors get royalties from their pubs or distributors when they are in libraries. Who would pay indies royalties if Amazon got them into libraries? You think AMAZON is going to pay authors for sales they get OUTSIDE of the Amazon store? Heck no! No way. Also, an arrangement like this wouldn't be legal. Amazon or any other retailer is not an indie's publisher. They can't negotiate any deals with an indie books, which would have to be done to put them in libraries.

People forget why Amazon started KDP in the first place. It wasn't to "revolutionize self-publishing" like some think. It was to keep EYES and WALLETS in the Amazon store. Amazon is never going to do something where it sends customers' attention elsewhere. Especially if they have to pay royalties too. They also have no responsibility to indies. We are contractors. We are not their authors and Amazon has no right (first of all) to negotiate deals for indies' books to be put anywhere else. Only the indie author can do that. Amazon can't strike deals on the behalf of indies.

So the main reasons are, Amazon can't do this in the first place. They don't have the power or legal rights to. Amazon doesn't have rights to indies' books. So they can't put our books in libraries. Only we can decide to do that. Secondly, nothing in it for Amazon. Why would Amazon want to send customers away from their store and to libraries where they can get books for free and then not buy books from Amazon? That would make no sense. That's like a grocery store sending paying customers to the food bank to get food THEN paying the customers to get free food at the food bank. All they would do is lose customers, so why would they do that?

Also, retailers (especially Amazon) has so many ways for readers to get books anyway. They have tons of free books.They have TWO in-house libraries: KU and Prime Reading. Amazon would prefer authors' books staying on THEIR site to lure customers there so they can buy stuff. So Amazon ain't ever gonna agree to a deal where they send people away from their store. No.

So that's why it won't happen. It makes no sense for Amazon.

If indies want books in libraries, it's their responsibility to put them there. Amazon is a retailer. It is not a distributor. It is not your publisher. It is not your partner or agent. If you want books in libraries then no, they can't be in KU. Yes, you gotta use a distributor. That's just the way it is. Being in libaries is a perk of being wide. You give up stuff when you go exclusive with Amazon and being in libraries is one of the things you give up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
To be clear. I thought that, because Libraries buy ebooks, that they were able to buy kindle ebooks for the library that people in the library can read. What would be the difference between a library buying a kindle ebook and an individual buying one? You bought your copy you own it, right? If someone comes over to your house and wants to read your kindle ebook on your computer what's the harm? It's not like they're selling it, right?

Or am I wrong? Let me know.

Dee
 

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You aren't actually getting KU books or Apub books from your library, you're getting books in a format that can be read on an Kindle. Because Kindle devices don't convert epubs automatically, and I believe some libraries actually lend out Kindles. A Kindle ebook just means it's a mobi format, something all distributors and publishers are capable of generating.

But, libraries have different pricing schemes because it's not a single person license. So the pricing is usually (and should be higher). And while no one says anything about a friend sharing an ebook with another friend, it's a lot different if they are sharing it with their entire neighborhood and making multiple copies of said ebook to do so, which is what libraries do. Depending on the license, they have a limit on simultaneous borrows and the number of actual borrows before they have to buy it again, or they pay at a per borrow basis (can't remember who does that one).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You aren't actually getting KU books or Apub books from your library, you're getting books in a format that can be read on an Kindle. Because Kindle devices don't convert epubs automatically, and I believe some libraries actually lend out Kindles. A Kindle ebook just means it's a mobi format, something all distributors and publishers are capable of generating.

But, libraries have different pricing schemes because it's not a single person license. So the pricing is usually (and should be higher). And while no one says anything about a friend sharing an ebook with another friend, it's a lot different if they are sharing it with their entire neighborhood and making multiple copies of said ebook to do so, which is what libraries do. Depending on the license, they have a limit on simultaneous borrows and the number of actual borrows before they have to buy it again, or they pay at a per borrow basis (can't remember who does that one).
I hadn't considered that a main branch was getting the ebooks and giving them out to smaller branches. Okay, I'm done. Thanks guys.

Dee
 

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I'm not understanding the Amazon NO, No, and No, on libraries buying Kindle eBooks. Because of my failing eyesight, I'm forced to do all my book reading on my Kindle. The Sacrament Public Library has 1000s of Kindle eBooks available to checkout for three weeks. Since I can't have my eBooks on KU if I use D2D to be able to sell to libraries, I'm in a catch 22. Amazon must have a vehicle to sell Kindle eBooks to libraries, and I doubt they would force Authors to use Overdrive and dump their KU participation.
Yet another reason to bail out of KU if you needed one! KU is a closed system and is a poor subscription model because it requires exclusivity to put your books in. There are others. Drop out, go direct to Kobo and the others through D2D!
 

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Amazon must have a vehicle to sell Kindle eBooks to libraries
They don't, though. Amazon isn't our publisher, they have nothing to gain helping us get into libraries. There are ways to do it, as Patty said.

And yes, there are "Kindle" books in libraries, meaning that format. There are also epubs, and I've seen the occasional PDF. The library I get books through links to Amazon for me to download the book. Amazon also lets me know when my file is expiring. The library tells me if something on hold is ready to download.
 
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