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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently downloaded a couple of free fonts, but I've found the free ones don't always have a huge selection.

I went to a site just to look around at the ones you could buy.  Wow!  Some were gorgeous..many are way too expensive though.  I did find a couple moderately priced but here's the kicker.

They had a long list of don'ts including don't use on a website etc.  You would need to buy some kind of license for certain things.  It would have been much easier if they would just tell people what they can use them for.  The list of don'ts was quite long.

My question is what is the point of buying a font if you can't use it?  What are you paying for?  Can you use them on covers?  Can someone direct me to a place with good fonts that you can buy and use any way you darned please (except selling them of course)?  I just don't get it...Thanks so much for any advice.  This is all really new to me.

I'm wanting fonts I can use primarily for book covers but also for certain pics with text on a website.  I'm really confused.  ???
 

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Hey Jeanne. I got to www.myfonts.com and buy fonts with commercial licenses (since I use them for my design business). You can gets fonts in all price ranges there. Good luck.  :)
 

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I'm not sure about licensing, but get most of my fonts from http:// www.daftont.com There are a ton of free ones, and you can browse by catagory or type, and even input your text to see what each font will look like ahead of time with your title...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks K.P.

I had recently registered at Veer and they gave me 10 free credits and said I could get a font with them.  They have so many wonderful fonts, but after reading all the restrictions, I just figured...forget it.  It isn't worth the hassle.  :)
 

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I get fonts either from Adobe, or from dafont.

For body text in a paper version, I do with Adobe "pro" fonts every time. For a cover, I am more likely to go for dafont.

I am careful of the license, but when we read it, we should recognize that some of the language in those licenses are really meant for competing font creators, or cases where the design of the font itself is the essence of the work being sold. (Like you find a font with a really cool "A" and so you make a t-shirt out of just that A -- that's inappropriate use of a font. You need to license it as artwork, with the designer getting credit as the soul artist.)

One thing to remember, with free and cheap fonts, is that very often they are just digitizing public domain letterforms. So if you need old fashioned fonts (as I often do) you'll actually find the greatest variety and depth at such places. (Big commercial houses do less of that because a competing house could just digitize the same public domain work.) And those older fonts tend to be more complete than the new ones you find on free sites. Further, with old fonts, if the provider isn't a twit, he recognizes that he isn't the real creator and licenses accordingly. (The twits tend to do a bad job anyway....)

When shopping at dafont it's good to find artists you like, who use licenses you can live with. A prolific artist can cover a lot of your needs. (I really like Deiter Steffman.) And even if the fonts are free, if you use them a lot, consider donating to the artist.

Camille
 

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dafont.com, abstractfonts.com, fontspace.com, and others all have some very nice fonts, some free, some not.  I found some freebies I liked that were clearly labeled by the creator as "free for commercial or personal use", which means you can use them for whatever you want.

The problem with using fonts on websites is that the fonts are generally only displayed on the other end if the visitor also has that font installed, or has their browser set to download and display fonts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Daring and Gatehouse.  You have both helped me immensely.  Much appreciated.  :)

I had no idea that people couldn't view certain fonts unless they had them too.  Who knew? Oh...um, I guess that would be you.  LOL
 

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The licensing of fonts came up on another thread that started out about image licenses for covers recently.  I am glad to see it repeated in it's own, more direct thread.

As I had stated on the other thread, I had completely overlooked the font license aspect.  As I had intended to mostly use fonts that came standard in programs like Word, Pages, Photoshop, Illustrator, etc., I had assumed (yes, I know, silly of me) that I could use them.  Specifically, that assumption came from programs like Illustrator - because isn't that the primary buyer of that program going to be likely looking for commercial use of some sort?  Another assumption, I know, I am wretched and embarrassed by it.

I was directed to an Adobe site that listed which of their standard included fonts licensing were for, but found it confusing.  It described the ability to embed for editing, embed for print and preview, and embed so that it could be shared to another computer when the file was opened on it.  I didn't see how that related to being used for a poster or ad or website or publication, etc.

I then did searches for the licensing on fonts that came standard with my own programs and couldn't find specifics.  The places selling the fonts (big houses since I was looking for specific ones that come with commonly used programs) had a request form to fill out, but no direct listing of what licenses covered what and how much they were.  I didn't fill out the forms out of frustration, but may end up doing that.

I can't believe I let myself fall in love with something as silly as a font for a particular look I was going for.  Egads.

Still... all that said... I'm glad to see these suggestions.  Maybe I'll find something similar to what I'd fallen in love with.

Though... question... how well do these fonts from dafont.com, abstractfonts.com, fontspace.com work in programs like Illustrator and Photoshop?  Are they vector based?  Do they take manipulation well?  I worry about the quality of free ones (though I thought the ones that came in these programs were "free"...).
 

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Well, some are vector, some are not, that's something that it should say on the download page.  Most of the ones I use are truetype fonts, which work great in word processors but can be problematic in graphic apps on occasion.  That being said, the fonts my title designer used for my book cover look great, and were freebies that I selected from one of those sites.  They are simple truetypes.  Take a look at my book cover (no, I'm not asking you to buy my book... LOL, I just love to brag on my cover artist and my logo designer, and send work their way!), and you can see that for things like book covers, a simple trutype font can work great.  I generally don't worry about whether it's designed for graphic applications or things like that... in the end, I know that if I can't make it look good, I have some excellent acquaintances who can do wonders with it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Randi,

Gosh, don't feel silly or embarrassed.  I thought the exact same thing.  The world of ebooking has opened up so many new things to me. I hadn't a clue about all of this stuff.

I recently downloaded two free fonts and put them in my Corel Paint Shop Pro.  They are very easy to work with and I can manipulate them just fine. :)
 

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Trutypes are mostly fine for ebook covers, because you rasterize them when you turn them into a jpg.  It's literally "what you see is what you get."

They are trickier when you're going for print, because they are interpreted.  You can "convert to outlines" (or whatever the term for that is now) in Illustrator to make conversions easier.

Camille
 

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daringnovelist said:
Trutypes are mostly fine for ebook covers, because you rasterize them when you turn them into a jpg. It's literally "what you see is what you get."

They are trickier when you're going for print, because they are interpreted. You can "convert to outlines" (or whatever the term for that is now) in Illustrator to make conversions easier.

Camille
That may be what my designer did... my book cover was a print cover first, and an ebook cover second. Then again, she has far more talent than I in the graphical areas!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
gatehouseauthor said:
That may be what my designer did... my book cover was a print cover first, and an ebook cover second. Then again, she has far more talent than I in the graphical areas!
That is a great cover and the font is gorgeous!
 

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daringnovelist said:
Trutypes are mostly fine for ebook covers, because you rasterize them when you turn them into a jpg. It's literally "what you see is what you get."

They are trickier when you're going for print, because they are interpreted. You can "convert to outlines" (or whatever the term for that is now) in Illustrator to make conversions easier.

Camille
I call it "convert to outlines." It's a good way to make small adjustments to a title. Or to customize some aspect of it. :D

Which also makes me wonder... would doing any of those things violate the licensing for the font? If so, why have the option to do it be so common a technique?

Sometimes, I feel like I need law studies in copyright, trademark, and licensing just to try to be an author... and I'm not even done with the story I want to release first yet. lol.

I'll forge ahead.

Okay, bad wording. Forge. :cringes:

I'll muscle through...?

~_~ooo

And Gatehouseauthor: That is a very pretty cover. And your font didn't degrade when I zoomed in a lot. Also, a good thing. Thanks for sharing that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi Ryne...did you have a good birthday? 

Yes, I do want to start reading some fantasy.  I've only really read Chronicles of Amber years ago.  I loved it and wanted to read more, but every time I would look in my book clubs, I always seemed to find books that were in the middle of a series and I hadn't read the first ones. 

Now that I'm here, I can catch them as they arrive.  :)

 

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JeanneM said:
Hi Ryne...did you have a good birthday?

Yes, I do want to start reading some fantasy. I've only really read Chronicles of Amber years ago. I loved it and wanted to read more, but every time I would look in my book clubs, I always seemed to find books that were in the middle of a series and I hadn't read the first ones.

Now that I'm here, I can catch them as they arrive. :)
It could have been better. My computer was hit with a virus that night, so it's in the shop until late next week at the earliest.

The only way I can write at the moment is by using pencil and paper. The computer I'm on right now is my parent's new computer, and it doesn't even have a word processor on it.

Other than that, I'm good though. I've hit 25 sales for the month already, so that good start off-sets everything else. :D
 

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You're making me blush, Ryne! ;) BTW, I just got your updated file today... reading your book this weekend... :)

By the way... I know it's always best to DIY, not only to save money, but for that sense of accomplishment. But if there's anyone who, like me when I worked on mine, just can't seem to get satisfied with their cover art or title design, the artist that did the dragon and the designer who did the logo are both available, and both work very affordably and quickly. I won't tell you what I paid, but it was well under $200 for both the artwork and the logo. And both of them have said it's okay for me to throw work at them, so feel free to contact them if you need a job done!

Artist: Barnaby Bagenda, can be contacted through his DeviantArt page at http://takrezz.deviantart.com/
Logo/Title Designer: Raquel Lopez, [email protected]

And no, I don't get kickbacks... ;)

Oh, and one last thing... I LOVE the Chronicles of Amber!
 

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Randirogue said:
I call it "convert to outlines." It's a good way to make small adjustments to a title. Or to customize some aspect of it. :D

Which also makes me wonder... would doing any of those things violate the licensing for the font? If so, why have the option to do it be so common a technique?

Sometimes, I feel like I need law studies in copyright, trademark, and licensing just to try to be an author... and I'm not even done with the story I want to release first yet. lol.
It's a very common technique to to resolve technical issue -- the most recommended technique, as a matter of fact. I can't imagine that converting to outlines in an of itself violates most licenses -- as long as it isn't used to get around some other aspect of the license.

Camille
 
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