Kindle Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,899 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,884 Posts
Yes, but even more from film analysis and critique. Stories are stories. And, by and large, we're all using the same toolbox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,899 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wearywanderer64 said:
I did a beginner's course recently and found I've learned a lot i.e. full description of characters and their motives before you even start writing. That has helped me a lot.
I guess a lot that is in the video many authors already know, but I haven't seen this so concise in videos on authoring books. Yeah, I now like to start by writing my list of character backgrounds and story arcs as to how they with change, if at at all, since I recently discovered outlining.

One thing the video did for me was that I'd just completed a book and wasn't really happy with the opening, as I was guessing half the readers would hate my MC because I hadn't shown why he was so pxxxxd off with everyone. If I hadn't seen the video, I would have left it as is. I havent deleted that chapter, but instead I've written a new 1st chapter and mover the other along to chapter 2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Interesting topic.

I got a promo on Facebook (IIRC) recently for Aaron Sorkin's masterclass on screenwriting, and after watching the trailer it occurred to me that there were strong parallels with novel writing. Even how Ron Howard sets up and shoots a scene might have some interesting lessons for me.

Once Silver Victory is in the can, I may make the jump and do a few of these.

 
Joined
·
286 Posts
Decon,

Is this the correct video? If you click on the YouTube button (above the smiley face emoji when you're writing a response) you can insert the video link. Just make sure to take the "s" off the "https" at the beginning of the link.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
939 Posts
I started out wanting to become a staff writer for TV, so probably 75% of my early writing was teleplays. It taught me a *lot* about pacing and structure. How to "button" a scene.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,899 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Lorri Moulton [Lavender Lass Books] said:
Decon,

Is this the correct video? If you click on the YouTube button (above the smiley face emoji when you're writing a response) you can insert the video link. Just make sure to take the "s" off the "https" at the beginning of the link.

Thanks. That's much better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Carol Davis said:
I started out wanting to become a staff writer for TV, so probably 75% of my early writing was teleplays. It taught me a *lot* about pacing and structure. How to "button" a scene.
I agree
In my opinion there is always something to learn from a screenplay. Sure, its a different format than a novel but it is still telling a story with characters.
I do however find that studying movies ( the end product of screenplays)
is even better. You can learn about pacing and character introductions and character development
And remember that movies have the same "genres" as novels
But even then, a thriller author can still learn about character interaction and story pacing just as much watching a western or thriller film even if they just write contemporary fiction
(in my opinion)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
705 Posts
I'm by no means an expert on this, but I finished a screenplay recently for fun and I was surprised how different it was from doing a book.  Not having a readers imagination to work with and having to show or at least outline everything that's in a scene was very different.  Heh, that might be common knowledge, but I was just surprised is all.  It made me realize just how much I can get away with in books.  Like, if I just say, the characters were in an office, readers can fill that in with any number of things.  But in a screenplay you have to describe it because you might use parts of that setting later that need to be in frame in earlier scenes.

Can you learn something though?  Absolutely, but it's a different animal.  Doing a screenplay reminded me more of painting a picture than telling a story.  Not that there's not elements of both in books and movies, but it's interesting to work with something where the focus is the visual and you have to give the viewer everything rather than the focus being the content and letting the reader create a visual with their imagination.

Plus, storytelling tips are always good.  Even if I don't always follow them, I'm glad to get them, and the video here is very interesting.  Because if I don't hear enough tips and tricks, then I won't know which ones I want to take to heart and which ones I want to disregard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Yes, I think so. Three act structure works perfectly well for novels. Movies are also very efficient at establishing characters. In most movies, you've met the main cast within the first fifteen minutes of the runtime. Dialogue scenes are probably the most obvious area of overlap. Think of the gas station scene in No Country For Old Men, for example. Great in the book, arguably even better in the movie adaptation.

If you're interested in the subject, I'd recommend the following books:
- Adventures in the Screen Trade by William Goldman: a memoirs by a screenwriting legend. The focus is the business of moviemaking, but it's also full of great quotes and screenwriting tips.
- Screenplay by Syd Field: useful analysis of structure. Afterwards, you'll be looking out for the Act 1 break in every movie you watch.
- Save the Cat! by Blake Snyder: slightly divisive but I found it to be a fun read. The title refers to the moment when the protagonist shows that he's worth rooting for.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top