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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Join our Mother's Day celebration here on KindleBoards!

In this thread, tell us about a "Mother"-related book that has meaning to you. It might be a book your mother loved. Or a book about mothers. Maybe a book you once gave to your mother, or plan to give her this Mother's Day.

We encourage you to use our Link Maker to post covers and links to those books in your post.

On Mother's Day (Sunday, May 10th), we'll draw three winners at random from your posts. Oberon has agreed to give each winner their choice of a Kindle 1 or Kindle 2 case. Wow! Thanks, Oberon!


See Oberon's selection of Kindle covers

Winners:
1 - tbd
2 - tbd
3 - tbd
 

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DTB (from a Mother's perspective):



This is (obviously) a children's book about the love between a mother and son. And yes, it does seem corny, BUT...

I first heard it read on the radio, when my son was in preschool. I was going back to work after attending a Mother's Day program at my daughter's elementary school. I was crying as I drove down the road listening to this.

When my son was young, I had difficulty reading it to him without getting teary-eyed. And I have friends who had the same reaction reading it to their children.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ah, good choice, Lynn. I would get choked up reading that book to my baby daughters, too.
 

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Angel Behind the Rocking Chair is my mom's favorite book. It is not available for the Kindle.



Product Description
After the loss of her first baby and the birth of a fourth child with Down Syndrome, Pam Vredevelt felt that she had fallen from God's grasp. As she was soon to discover, however, God was just beginning to hold her tight and lead the way out of her endless pit of despair. With humor and touching insight, Pam unveils her struggle to emerge from darkness into the light in this paperback release of her popular work. Many have been touched by the same anguish; Pam shares their stories and how the supernatural touch of God sustained them through the darkest days of life.
 

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I liked The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein. I'm not sure if it's about mothers, but when I was reading it, the tree reminded me of a mother (or just a parent). Sorry, about not having the link. Don't know how.  ???
 

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Love You Forever gets me all teary-eyed every time (wonderful choice!), but a book that always makes me think of my mother is another picture book: The Littlest Angel by Charles Tazewell.


From Amazon: "First released in book form in 1946, this story has since appeared in numerous editions. It tells of a small angel who simply can't get with the program no matter how hard he tries until an understanding elder realizes that he is homesick and is able to retrieve a box of his most treasured possessions from 'back home.' When it comes time for Jesus to be born on Earth, the Littlest Angel gives his precious box to the Baby, but he is worried that God will think his gift too humble. However, God is pleased indeed, and transforms the box into the Star of Bethlehem..."

I grew up with an older edition of The Littlest Angel, but Mom recently surprised me with a gift of the newer version. It still makes me cry!
 

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The Lord of the Rings (Trilogy)
I contribute my love of reading to the hours that my mom read to me and my brothers all the way up to highschool. this included the recently added Fellowship of the Ring. I am currently reading the Hobbit aloud to my daughter I plan to continue through the trilogy.
Sylvia
 

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I'm going with this one. It was the first book I read to both of my kids, while in utero and post-birth at the hospital. No matter how much fussing was going on when they were babies, they would quiet right down when I started reading it. I've read it so many times that I no longer need the book, which helps since I still recite it to them (at 4 and 6) when they have bad dreams. Thanks for asking Harvey, and thank you Oberon for the kind offer.

 

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I'm not having much luck making this a link & am out of patience. Here's the front cover of the book:



Unfortunately, this book isn't available on Kindle..yet.

My late mother grew up in Tennessee, not far from Kentucky where Janice Holt Giles came to live and wrote most of her books. Giles wrote about the rural dwellers of Kentucky with respect & was one of my mother's favorite authors. My mother wrote Giles a letter telling her so, and my mother kept Mrs. Giles' reply to her for over 30 years. It meant a lot to my mother that a busy author had taken the time to answer my mother's letter personally.

I miss discussing books with the woman who taught me to read and to value the written word. I know if she had seen my Kindle she would have claimed to have no interest in it--until she picked it up and started using it herself. ;)
 

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My daughter gave me this book for Mother's Day when she was in her late teens. We'd had a rocky couple of years - this was pretty much the signal that all was forgiven.



She also gave me this one a few years ago - I found the stuffed version of Big Nutbrown Hare & Little Nutbrown Hare to go with it and now I read it to her daughter.



My own mother loved to read (as did my dad) - they frequently gave me books as gifts when I was growing up. We were always trading book recommendations once I was an adult. They wouldn't let me see a lot of movies that they thought were too adult, but never stopped me from reading any book I wanted.
I always got a giggle out of the fact that my mom recommended

and when I read it I was shocked at all the kinky bits in it. Didn't sound like my mom's type of book at all. :)
 

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My mother and I often had "issues" with each other, about the ways we each saw/did things. My big sister says it was because we were so alike. 5 yrs ago, my parents passed away 8 days apart. My choice of book would be:



because I wish I had one.

Susie
 

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I thought about this for a while and chose Beatrix Potter - Tale of the Pie and the Patty Pan. I have a copy of this book, its a small 4x4 book with a green hardcover and it was mine when I was a baby. At christmas this year my mom sent it in the box of stuff for my kids and it made me tear up a little. I have very few things from when I was a kid for some reason... I have no pictures at all. But I have fond memories of my mom and grandmother reading me this little book. As a mom myself I have to admit its annoying to read the thing to my own kids cause its long and they don't know half the words in it, but they still beg for it like I am sure I did with my own mom. Makes me appreciate her for doing it even more :)
 

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It's really late & I'm not sure how to do the link thing, but besides the Anne of Green Gables books about an adopted girl, another 1 of my favorites is "pictures of hollis woods" by Patricia Reilly Giff. That's about a lonely young orphan girl who has had bad experiences "in the system" & who just wants a family to love & to love her. Some people keep a diary or journal. She draws her life's experiences using paper & pencils & colored pencils. I love the writing style & a book that I will be re-reading every year. It was also a Hallmark Hall of Fame movie. That's how I found out about this book.  ;D
 

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It;s odd to think how often mothers are taken advantage of, forgotten, ignored, and abused and yet they do the worlds single hardest and most enjoyable jobs. My mother and I have our fights ((hiding form one right now really)). I and my mother, despite the hellish times, the fights, the squabbles and abuse have always had reading in common. When I was younger we read all the time. After all, when teaching a three year old to read, how many options do you have?

After she started working she nurtured my love of reading with what became my best pal

It is this love of reading that spurred me to start reading with her again, in our own small book club. I aim to share, as she did with me, a book that has brought me great joy and great sorrow as well as understanding. I can only hope she does not read this I feel this books sheer beauty and understanding will not only celebrate my mothers will power to survive even the tughest of times, but as well as complement the beauty that she has brought to my life allowing me to bein her life even as an adult.
 

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My mother and I share the same birth day, 06-06. I lived and grew up on the high plains. Trees were not plentiful, but highly valued and grew because people took the time to plant, water and nurture trees. One year my mother gave me A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith. This book has always held many memories and reminders of of a woman who has nurtured everyone and everything that came under her care.
 

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A Heart breaking and heart warming true story. this is a stunning must read for all moms and everyone else. even made this stoic semi-old man tear up but don't tell anyone.
 

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I Love You Forever~this is a real tear jerker but it is by far my favorite mother related book. I sent a copy to my son when he moved away from home. My mother was a teacher as was I and we shared this book with many children over the years.
Jeanne
 

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As some of you know, I just lost my mom back in February. We'd had a very rocky relationship, but I loved her very much, and soon before she passed away, she told me for the first time in memory that she loved me, too. No matter how much she hurt me or how apart we were, I never forgot that she gave me her love of animals and of reading. And a sense of humor that few people totally get.

She never read the highbrow stuff, really, but that was okay -- I found that on my own. The thing is, now that I think about it, she read a few of the classics when I brought them home, Granted, it was when there wasn't much else to read. She undoubtedly got her love of reading from my grandmother, who lives with me. One of the few downsides to Kindle ownership is my sudden inability to share books with my grandmother. This gives her an excuse to go to the used bookstore, sip coffee, and gossip with the owner.

Anyhow, book(s) I associate with my mother.

The first one I got years of mileage out of when I point out to people she read it to me as a bedtime story when I was maybe 6 or 7. She left in all the violence, but censored the swearing. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you...

<--- not Kindleized.

There were a couple authors my mother and grandmother had in common. The two who spring to mind are Catherine Cookson and Barbara Michaels. Cookson was always a little dreary for my tastes, but love teh creepy gothic feel of a Barbara Michaels. (The author also writes as Elizabeth Peters.)



<-- my fave and it's on my Kindle.



I don't remember the first Stephen King book my mother introduced into the house, but I think it might have been:



When we went to see the movie version of The Shining, I was allowed to see all the blood and gore, but my mother or my grandmother -- maybe both -- clapped their hands over my eyes when the naked woman came out of the tub. See a trend?

It's possible the book was also:

Now, she didn't read this one to me as a bedtime story, but we did watch the miniseries (with David Soul) together. I remember being curled up on the couch with her and with our Yorkie. During a shocking moment, we both screamed so loud that the poor dog practically hit the ceiling and endeavored to get as far away from us as possible.

My mother wasn't perfect. She was a single mom and I don't think I was anywhere near planned, but I believe she wanted the best of me, and that she was proud that I was "a reader." My grandmother, too, for that matter. She introduced me that way to the aforementioned owner of the used book store. My grandmother raised me, too. I shared a bed with her for many years and she would always read before turning out the light. She still does. Now her bed partner is the dachshund who she totally stole. No longer our dog -- now her dog. I went from doggy mom to, what, doggy niece? But I digress.

My grandmother really enjoyed and insisted I should read:



Um, it's in the TBR pile. :)
 
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