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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning on going wide with my book one in a couple weeks when it comes off KU. Not going back in!

Is draft to digital the best way to start out? My worry is taking too much time with ton of vendors.

Any suggestions for someone who is just starting to go wide?  =  )
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Wow! Writer's cafe must have a lot of people viewing. I had 15 views on this after one minute! That's insane.
 

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Definitely, Draft2Digital. Well worth the 10 percent off the top.

The only drawback is that D2D doesn't distribute to Google Play (which earns me about as much as Kobo does, therefore very much worth having). I was lucky enough to have an account with Google Books, the predecessor platform, which I was able to reactivate. But Google is a much more difficult platform to work with, so I wouldn't let that keep you away from D2D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
notjohn said:
Definitely, Draft2Digital. Well worth the 10 percent off the top.

The only drawback is that D2D doesn't distribute to Google Play (which earns me about as much as Kobo does, therefore very much worth having). I was lucky enough to have an account with Google Books, the predecessor platform, which I was able to reactivate. But Google is a much more difficult platform to work with, so I wouldn't let that keep you away from D2D.
Thanks for the info!

I'm hoping to get some bookbubs in the future and it seems they are quite hard to get in fantasy if you are in KU. I also think KU is ripping off authors. Even if people are making a lot of money they are leaving a huge chunk on the table by not being more vocal about the page flip issues, among others like the pie being sliced smaller and smaller.
 

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I definitely recommend going direct with Kobo. Their in-store promotions are a great way to get a boost and they're only available if you go direct.

Ditto with Nook. It's taken me years to land an in-store promotion with them, but when they listed my permafree it kicked my sales there above $1,000 for the first month ever. Better than I did on Nook when I had the same permafree listed on Bookbub!
 

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aimeeeasterling said:
I definitely recommend going direct with Kobo. Their in-store promotions are a great way to get a boost and they're only available if you go direct.

Ditto with Nook. It's taken me years to land an in-store promotion with them, but when they listed my permafree it kicked my sales there above $1,000 for the first month ever. Better than I did on Nook when I had the same permafree listed on Bookbub!
How did you get the in store promotion with BN/Nook Press?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Chrissy said:
How did you get the in store promotion with BN/Nook Press?
So Nook and Kobo should be direct? Then is Draft to Digital just for the other vendors?
 

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aimeeeasterling said:
I definitely recommend going direct with Kobo. Their in-store promotions are a great way to get a boost and they're only available if you go direct.
Are the in-store promotions now available to everyone? Back when I went direct with Kobo the promotions were in beta, and only available to a few. It stayed that way for what felt like forever, so I eventually left and began to use D2D for Kobo, as well.
 

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MClayton said:
Are the in-store promotions now available to everyone? Back when I went direct with Kobo the promotions were in beta, and only available to a few. It stayed that way for what felt like forever, so I eventually left and began to use D2D for Kobo, as well.
If you contact them and ask for the Promotions tab to be activated, they'll do it within a day or two. I just did this two weeks ago.
 

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Herefortheride said:
So Nook and Kobo should be direct? Then is Draft to Digital just for the other vendors?
There is no "should be," IMHO. Everyone has different needs, different expectations, and different experiences. You need to do your own due diligence regarding each of the direct services as well as the various aggregators (e.g., Pronoun, D2D, Smashwords, etc.) to see what they can offer you. Read the terms of service for each direct-access retailer and the aggregators first, which will include royalty percentages and payment methods/schedules/minimum thresholds. Read the threads on here regarding each of those services. Then you'll have the information you need to ask more drilled-down questions pertaining to your own particular situation.
 

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I never understood the issue with going direct. I went with D2D only because I'm canadian, so it made sense. But Im direct with kobo and amazon.

When I update my books or publish a new one, it literally takes me only a couple minutes to upload to kobo. I could be direct with 10 vendors and it's no more hassle than being direct with one in my opinion. Well, okay, instead of a change taking 5 minutes it takes 10 or 15. Of all the time you spend in the publishing process, it's not even a drop in the bucket.

Giving away 10% of your royalties to save a couple minutes never made sense to me.
 

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Seneca42 said:
I never understood the issue with going direct. I went with D2D only because I'm canadian, so it made sense. But Im direct with kobo and amazon.

When I update my books or publish a new one, it literally takes me only a couple minutes to upload to kobo. I could be direct with 10 vendors and it's no more hassle than being direct with one in my opinion. Well, okay, instead of a change taking 5 minutes it takes 10 or 15. Of all the time you spend in the publishing process, it's not even a drop in the bucket.

Giving away 10% of your royalties to save a couple minutes never made sense to me.
If you're sure you want to be wide forever, then yes, it probably makes sense to go direct when you can. However, for an author who is experimenting with wide but might change his or her mind, aggregators can get a book taken down much more rapidly sometimes than individuals can. This is particularly an issue with Kobo, who pushes the books way downstream to all kinds of affiliated bookstores. I could be wrong, but I think all the horrors stories I've heard in that regard came from people who went direct to Kobo.

Sometimes, aggregators are also a shield against individual vendor weirdness. For instance, Pronoun seems to be able to prevent Google Play from doing its arbitrary discounting. Pronoun can also work around some Amazon restrictions (for example, to make books permafree without having to mess with price matching). In both cases, it's probably the Macmillan connection that enables Pronoun to do that.
 

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It's always a question of cost-benefit how to go wide--aggregator or direct?

If you're prawny--let's just say under $100 a month in sales--giving aggregators 10% ($10) is likely worth the work savings.

If you're making much more--let's say $10,000 a month--you have to ask, is it better to give them $1000/month, or do some work to go direct as much as possible and save some or all of that money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Seneca42 said:
I never understood the issue with going direct. I went with D2D only because I'm canadian, so it made sense. But Im direct with kobo and amazon.

When I update my books or publish a new one, it literally takes me only a couple minutes to upload to kobo. I could be direct with 10 vendors and it's no more hassle than being direct with one in my opinion. Well, okay, instead of a change taking 5 minutes it takes 10 or 15. Of all the time you spend in the publishing process, it's not even a drop in the bucket.

Giving away 10% of your royalties to save a couple minutes never made sense to me.
Perhaps you are looking at it wrong? Many people use D2D and have good things to say about it.
 

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Mercedes Vox said:
There is no "should be," IMHO. Everyone has different needs, different expectations, and different experiences. You need to do your own due diligence regarding each of the direct services as well as the various aggregators (e.g., Pronoun, D2D, Smashwords, etc.) to see what they can offer you. Read the terms of service for each direct-access retailer and the aggregators first, which will include royalty percentages and payment methods/schedules/minimum thresholds. Read the threads on here regarding each of those services. Then you'll have the information you need to ask more drilled-down questions pertaining to your own particular situation.
I agree with this. I've done it all ways - KU, direct to various outlets, wide via Smashwords and D2D. Different things worked at different times. Now I go through D2D primarily for two reasons: 1) I got frustrated with Kobo and Nook for various issues, and 2) I don't want to have to re-upload in half a dozen places every time I make a small change. It takes me more than 10-15 minutes, because I'm OCD about this stuff. Any small change, and I'm going to go completely through the manuscript and check issues in every version.

Everyone has to find his/her best fit.
 

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Bill Hiatt said:
IHowever, for an author who is experimenting with wide but might change his or her mind, aggregators can get a book taken down much more rapidly sometimes than individuals can. This is particularly an issue with Kobo, who pushes the books way downstream to all kinds of affiliated bookstores. I could be wrong, but I think all the horrors stories I've heard in that regard came from people who went direct to Kobo.
Not entirely. When I first went into KU, I had fits trying to get my books off of one of Smashwords' retailers, as well as one of the KOBO downstream outlets (I distributed to KOBO through Smashwords).
 
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