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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I'm a newbie and made a newbie mistake with the first editor I hired. Now I'm a bit stuck, either wait for months before I can get my manuscript back with edits made or try to find another person to do copy edits within my small budget.  :(

I don't think I'll be able to find someone, but I thought it'd be worth a shot. I emailed a few people and just wanted to check on the boards you know of anyone who might be available.
 

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Linda Castillo said:
So, I'm a newbie and made a newbie mistake with the first editor I hired. Now I'm a bit stuck, either wait for months before I can get my manuscript back with edits made or try to find another person to do copy edits within my small budget. :(

I don't think I'll be able to find someone, but I thought it'd be worth a shot. I emailed a few people and just wanted to check on the boards you know of anyone who might be available.
Just out of curiosity, what was the mistake made?

I wish you the best on the copyeditor. I'm training myself this year on copyediting, but I'm not there yet. If I were, I'd offer to you a free trial run.

Jodi

ETA: Unless I'm mistaken, I think your other thread went into the mistake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jodi said:
Just out of curiosity, what was the mistake made?

I wish you the best on the copyeditor. I'm training myself this year on copyediting, but I'm not there yet. If I were, I'd offer to you a free trial run.

Jodi

ETA: Unless I'm mistaken, I think your other thread went into the mistake.
the other thread went into it a little but I can share here. I thought the editor and I were clear about the deadline for when I wanted the edits completed, then the editor stated that it'll take an extra month to do the edits because my manuscript was too messy (e.g., too many typos, misspellings, comma placement, grammar issues). I thought copy editor's were hired to fix all that? Am I misunderstanding what a copy editor's job is?

Now, the editor I hired said she completed half the manuscript but will want to read over it again once I fixed the edits and may even have to go through it a third or fourth time since I'm not sending her a clean enough manuscript. I started to freak out when she said that. This doesn't feel right.

sigh. This has been a stressful couple of weeks.
 

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Our next opening is April 1.

http://redadeptpublishing.com/editing-services/

Here is a breakdown of our process: (Time estimates assume a book is between 40,000 and 99,000 words.

1. First Edit - The editor reads the entire book and uses Track Changes to make corrections and suggested fixes. The editor also creates a new document to note plot/storyline and character development issues. This document, the "Notes" page, also includes explanations of recurring grammatical errors. This step takes approximately two weeks.
2. Phone Call - The editor calls the author and goes over the Notes page. Authors should allow at least one hour for this call.
3. The author goes through the edit, accepting/rejecting changes and making changes of their own using Track Changes. We cannot estimate a time period for this stage as it depends entirely on the author.
4. Second Edit - Once the author completes the first edit, he or she sends the manuscript back to the editor. The editor goes through the "changes" (which are apparent via Track Changes), accepting them, then making appropriate editorial adjustments. This step takes approximately one week, but it also depends on the editor's schedule when the book is returned.
5. The author goes through the Second Edit, accepting/rejecting changes and making further changes as needed. We cannot estimate a time period for this stage as it depends entirely on the author.
6. There is a possibility of additional edits if there are still issues to be addressed. This is common. There is no additional charge for these, as long as the author does not suddenly decide to rewrite large portions of the book. The time needed for additional edits becomes progressively smaller as there are less changes each time.
7. Proofreading - When the author and editor are satisfied with the book, the book is assigned to a proofreader. The proofreader-always a different person from the editor-reads the entire book, making corrections using Track Changes. This step takes approximately one week.
8. The author goes through the proofread in the same manner as was done with the edit and returns the manuscript so the changes can be looked at by an editor. We cannot estimate a time period for this stage as it depends entirely on the author.
9. If an additional proofread is purchased, repeat Steps 7 and 8.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lynn McNamee said:
Our next opening is April 1.

http://redadeptpublishing.com/editing-services/

Here is a breakdown of our process: (Time estimates assume a book is between 40,000 and 99,000 words.

1. First Edit - The editor reads the entire book and uses Track Changes to make corrections and suggested fixes. The editor also creates a new document to note plot/storyline and character development issues. This document, the "Notes" page, also includes explanations of recurring grammatical errors. This step takes approximately two weeks.
2. Phone Call - The editor calls the author and goes over the Notes page. Authors should allow at least one hour for this call.
3. The author goes through the edit, accepting/rejecting changes and making changes of their own using Track Changes. We cannot estimate a time period for this stage as it depends entirely on the author.
4. Second Edit - Once the author completes the first edit, he or she sends the manuscript back to the editor. The editor goes through the "changes" (which are apparent via Track Changes), accepting them, then making appropriate editorial adjustments. This step takes approximately one week, but it also depends on the editor's schedule when the book is returned.
5. The author goes through the Second Edit, accepting/rejecting changes and making further changes as needed. We cannot estimate a time period for this stage as it depends entirely on the author.
6. There is a possibility of additional edits if there are still issues to be addressed. This is common. There is no additional charge for these, as long as the author does not suddenly decide to rewrite large portions of the book. The time needed for additional edits becomes progressively smaller as there are less changes each time.
7. Proofreading - When the author and editor are satisfied with the book, the book is assigned to a proofreader. The proofreader-always a different person from the editor-reads the entire book, making corrections using Track Changes. This step takes approximately one week.
8. The author goes through the proofread in the same manner as was done with the edit and returns the manuscript so the changes can be looked at by an editor. We cannot estimate a time period for this stage as it depends entirely on the author.
9. If an additional proofread is purchased, repeat Steps 7 and 8.
thanks for the information. I love the clarity of the services you offer. I submitted the manuscript for a sample edit and price quote.
 

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Linda Castillo said:
the other thread went into it a little but I can share here. I thought the editor and I were clear about the deadline for when I wanted the edits completed, then the editor stated that it'll take an extra month to do the edits because my manuscript was too messy (e.g., too many typos, misspellings, comma placement, grammar issues). I thought copy editor's were hired to fix all that? Am I misunderstanding what a copy editor's job is?
From what I understand of the business, a copyeditor looks at a sample and creates an estimate (of turnaround and price) based off it. That is not to say all copyeditors do it this way, however. If your copyeditor worked like this, things could have gone wrong in the estimation step. But generally, it should have been accounted for in the original estimate. (Sometimes if the sample isn't really representative of the work, then there might be cause for turnaround adjustment).

Linda Castillo said:
Now, the editor I hired said she completed half the manuscript but will want to read over it again once I fixed the edits and may even have to go through it a third or fourth time since I'm not sending her a clean enough manuscript. I started to freak out when she said that. This doesn't feel right.
Something does sound wrong there. If she had misestimated the work and time involved on her end, she should have realized it early in the process and notified you as soon as possible. Again, keep in mind I'm just going by the research I've done myself. I'm not a copyeditor.

ETA: However, it does sound good that she wants to make sure that no mistakes are missed. In my day job, I critique students' papers. Sometimes when many grammar/line edit corrections needed, I don't actually correct every error, because the student would be overwhelmed. In that case (when overwhelmed), the student often misses some of my corrections. But there is a difference in media, too. With the student, I red-pen on printed papers. I imagine with your copyeditor it is Track Changes? But even so, numerous edits through Track Changes can still be overwhelming, and it is easy to click the wrong thing when accepting or rejecting a change.

Linda Castillo said:
sigh. This has been a stressful couple of weeks.
Sounds like it! You have my sympathies. I keep my fingers crossed that your situation is resolved soon. I just wish I could do more to help you. :-(

Jodi

(Many modifications :) Because I'm not a proofreader :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Jodi said:
From what I understand of the business, a copyeditor looks at a sample and creates an estimate (of turnaround and price) based off it. That is not to say all copyeditors do it this way, however. If your copyeditor worked like this, things could have gone wrong in the estimation step. But generally, it should have been accounted for in the original estimate. (Sometimes if the sample isn't really representative of the work, then there might be cause for turnaround adjustment).

Something does sound wrong there. If she had misestimated the work and time involved on her end, she should have realized it early in the process and notified you as soon as possible. Again, keep in mind I'm just going by the research I've done myself. I'm not a copyeditor.

Sounds like it! You have my sympathies. I keep my fingers crossed that your situation is resolved soon. I just wish I could do more to help you. :-(

Jodi
thanks for the kind words. I've definetely learned a lot from the process. Worst thing is that I lost some money and I have to push back my release date. But, I have my health and all my teeth. ;D
 

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Emerald Lemmons is GREAT. Like theeee best. She was the editor for my NY Times novel SCANDALOUS. Our time lines didn't work at one point and I ended up using someone else for a while. HUGE MISTAKE. I wish I could undo that. I don't even want to get into it. My eye will twitch outa my head.

Anyway, Emerlad's turn around time is fast (like a week or two) and she knows her stuff. She's affordable, but she only takes on new clients via recommendations. You can contact her via Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/emerald.lemmons Tell her that Holly sent you and that you're in a bind. I'm not sure what her schedule looks like right now, but if she can take you in, jump at it.

Good luck. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
holly w. said:
Emerald Lemmons is GREAT. Like theeee best. She was the editor for my NY Times novel SCANDALOUS. Our time lines didn't work at one point and I ended up using someone else for a while. HUGE MISTAKE. I wish I could undo that. I don't even want to get into it. My eye will twitch outa my head.

Anyway, Emerlad's turn around time is fast (like a week or two) and she knows her stuff. She's affordable, but she only takes on new clients via recommendations. You can contact her via Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/emerald.lemmons Tell her that Holly sent you and that you're in a bind. I'm not sure what her schedule looks like right now, but if she can take you in, jump at it.

Good luck. :)
thanks holly!
 
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