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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My novels tend to span across multi-genres (sci-fi, UF, Paranormal, Horror, Mystery, Suspense, etc.).  That was never my intended goal, but that was the end result.  For those of you who also fall into this category, how do you market your books?
 

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Very poorly. My RIDE HOME is, I would say, domestic noir. So I've used suspense, noir, marital relationships, and other labels. Most readers  come to it, I think, after buying my first, THE PETOSKEY STONE. It's a tough problem.
 

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I have a similar thread here

Speaking as a reader AND a writer, having a book listed in the "correct" genre, or cross genre is important for more than just sales. For instance, if a customer buys something that looks like "hard" science fiction, they will have certain expectations. If the author adds magic or wizardry to the story, then the customer will be pretty upset (I would be!) and might right a nasty review. However, if there were a weird new cross-genre "science fiction/Magic" then all would be well, as long as the book was listed there. Once upon a time there was no such thing as "Paranormal Romance" or "Alternate History SF" so those early pioneers had to deal with this..

Now the problem you seem to be having is that your book crosses too many genres to be able to categorize it. I would suggest that you try to determine which two "best' describes your book and go with those. That will at least get some of the right people to your Amazon page. Then, hopefully your book cover and description will do the rest of the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, Joseph.

Exactly.  I tend to use Sci-fi thriller, but not Hard Sci-fi.  Genetics and cloning are the main factors that fall under sci-fi.  The rest deals with government conspiracy, etc.
 

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It's very difficult and the process of trying to do it myself has made me more sympathetic (though not much more!) to the publishers who rejected my books on the basis that the stories were cross-genre.  Probably the most difficult of mine to market for this reason is Baby Talk, which is a book that either scares the crap out of people or causes them to laugh hysterically, or both.  So, it is a horror/black comedy.  I've pitched it both ways and horror seems to work much better than black comedy.  My advice is to experiment with various angles and see which one works best. Twitter is a good way to do that--you can tweet various "hooks" and watch the response to each one.  This is how I've narrowed a couple of my book genres down.  All that matters is that whatever genre you use to describe a particular book is one that hits the hot button in the right readers.
 

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Leonard, I read your story description and I might be wrong but it sounds to me that your book fits into the category of what publishers are calling "dystopian fiction" - which includes huge hits like The Passage (vampire or zombie apocalypse kind of thing) -  more than sci fi, really.  It is NOT what I would classify as mystery, suspense, UFO (that tends to be more real life UFO experiences) - and it is MOST DEFINITELY NOT what the book world calls paranormal.

It may be horror, too, but it's not as overtly so as I would call it dystopian.

Hope that helps - as a cross genre-ist (mystery/thriller/horror) I definitely feel your pain.   I can tell you, though, when you start getting reader mail, you'll have a better grasp on what your readers think your books are and what THEY like about them, and that will help you tweak your marketing efforts.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Alexandra Sokoloff said:
Leonard, I read your story description and I might be wrong but it sounds to me that your book fits into the category of what publishers are calling "dystopian fiction" - which includes huge hits like The Passage (vampire or zombie apocalypse kind of thing) - more than sci fi, really. It is NOT what I would classify as mystery, suspense, UFO (that tends to be more real life UFO experiences) - and it is MOST DEFINITELY NOT what the book world calls paranormal.

It may be horror, too, but it's not as overtly so as I would call it dystopian.

Hope that helps - as a cross genre-ist (mystery/thriller/horror) I definitely feel your pain. I can tell you, though, when you start getting reader mail, you'll have a better grasp on what your readers think your books are and what THEY like about them, and that will help you tweak your marketing efforts.

Good luck!
Thanks Alexandra! Yes, I've had some categorize it there, too. No UFOs though.
 

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LeonardDHilleyII said:
My novels tend to span across multi-genres (sci-fi, UF, Paranormal, Horror, Mystery, Suspense, etc.). That was never my intended goal, but that was the end result. For those of you who also fall into this category, how do you market your books?
Make a blog. Work on selling your name as well as your books.
 

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I have a slightly different problem with my upcoming ebook reissue of my long out of print novel It's Only Rock and Roll. When it first came out it was listed as YA, even though the character goes from 18-24 through the course of the book. Now I've rewritten it and added an epilog taking the character up to the age of 50. On the other hand, rock and roll is a subject that appeals to the YA audience and the style is still kind of YA. So what do I do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Bruce Pollock said:
I have a slightly different problem with my upcoming ebook reissue of my long out of print novel It's Only Rock and Roll. When it first came out it was listed as YA, even though the character goes from 18-24 through the course of the book. Now I've rewritten it and added an epilog taking the character up to the age of 50. On the other hand, rock and roll is a subject that appeals to the YA audience and the style is still kind of YA. So what do I do?
I don't know that I'd try to place it as YA. Rock and Roll is what is generally used for the music of the 50s and 60s. Most music that interests kids today is called Pop, R&B, or Hard Rock. It may appeal to YA though, but a lot depends on the music genre they prefer.
 
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