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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I've got my book on amazon and smashwords. Smashwords just approved me for their premium distribution, so i guess I'll be in B & N in a little while?

So what other places are there that i can submit my e-book too?
 

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Guido Henkel said:
Before trying to have your book listed all over the place, you might want to take a look at a recent blog post of mine about "focusing your distribution." You might find some interest thoughts in there.
My comment is awaiting approval at your site but I'll summarize by saying that "focusing your distribution" seems to be ignoring/discarding the wishes of readers who like shopping at sites like Diesel. They have a neat rewards program and if I wanted to buy your book there I can't? Sorry, but as a reader, and potential fan of your work, that wouldn't sit well with me.

Look at history in other areas. This has parallels to DRM. People got very angry at the Eagles and other bands for making their CDs only available at Wal-mart. It's one thing to make exclusive/special/bonus versions for certain stores but to only sell your books at certain stores? Recipe for reader backlash.

Readers don't backlash? Look what they are doing to authors with high priced ebooks.

Respectfully, best of luck if it works for you, Guido, but I doubt that's very good for readers if authors en masse start doing this. What happens if one of your big three turns on you? You stop selling there? Haven't you limited all your marketing eggs in three baskets?
 

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"Look at history in other areas. This has parallels to DRM. People got very angry at the Eagles and other bands for making their CDs only available at Wal-mart. It's one thing to make exclusive/special/bonus versions for certain stores but to only sell your books at certain stores? Recipe for reader backlash."

We can see how this works with the new Amazon Thomas & Mercer imprint. They will be Amazon exclusive eBooks. Paper will have wider distribution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Interesting idea about focusing your distribution. I might do that when I release my full novels. But books like "tricks of the trade" I decided to use just to bring more readers in. That's why I have it for free on smashwords and am hoping amazon would make the .99 cent version free as well.

I figure i'd plaster the book all over because for now it's not about sales ranking, it just about getting as much readers as possible.

I'm actually doing way better on smashwords then I am on Amazon. That's because it's free on smashwords and I have been advertising the free book since it makes it easier for me to get readers.

But when I release the full book (hopefully by July 4th) well...I don't know. Making it available in only 4 or 5 platforms might not be such a bad idea.
Did you upload to B & N yourself or did smashwords do it for you? I'm a little confused as to how all that works too.
 

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Free books are an entirely different beast of course. They don't benefit from sales ranking etc. With free books, yes, you can and probably should get them out wherever you can - and why in the world not?

As for Todd's comments, I wholeheartedly disagree with him, of course. I think getting frazzled doesn't help anyone and just catering to all sorts of outlets just because there is this one person who "always" buys there is - in my opinion - a wasted effort. Every outlet will have some loyal fans, and for good reason, most likely. That does not mean they will go there exclusively and more importantly, this is not necessarily in your best interest.

As the publisher of books I have to do what makes most business sense for me. Of course, making my readers and customers happy is on the top of the list, but there has to be a balance. To sacrifice a major part of my product quality and put my books up on Smashwords so they will find their way onto Diesel's shelves is just not a good option, not to mention the time it takes. From a business standpoint, for me , it simply makes more sense to drive even that one Diesel sale to Amazon or so so that it will be put to best use for maximum effect.

But, of course, not everyone agrees with that, and it is perfectly fine with me.
 

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I think Guido makes a lot of sense. The counter argument might be that there are people who shop exclusively at one online store, and if your book isn't there, you lose them as a potential customer.

Also, if someone never looks at Diesel, your book being at Diesel is irrelevant to that reader. It only becomes relevant for those shoppers who shop at a variety of online stores. If I shop at Amazon, B&N, Kobo, and Apple, your book could be on Diesel, Sony, and Smashwords and your sales wouldn't be diluted anyway -- I never shop at those places.

I think what Guido is getting at is when your marketing efforts end up directing a reader to your work. If that is how a reader finds you, it makes sense if you can concentrate the results. If your marketing results in an extra 50 sales a month, if you can push those sales to Amazon it will make a dramatic impact on your sales ranking if you're not already in the top 5000.

In terms of readers randomly finding your books for sale, I don't think we can focus those results into a few places. The reader with a Sony e-reader may only shop at Sony. If our books aren't there, he may never see them anywhere else.
 

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I posted a reply to Guido his blog. What I suggest is that initially you may benefit, like he says.from focusing your marketing efforts to get a sales spike at the big sites. But once it becomes obvious that, after price changes and many promotions, your book will not sell as before, it may then make sense to place it in other outlets. One possible other outlet to place e-books is Scribd.com. They have millions of readers although their sales/marketing infrastructure for authors is not as advanced as in other sites.

Phanto
 

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To a certain extent, I agree. But if you write romance, I'd add AllRomanceEbooks to your list. For many authors, it produces bigger results than Amazon, B&N, or Kobo.

That being said, I do happen to have my books on Smashwords and am awaiting getting listed on the various premium outlets. However, when I do marketing pushes, I only ever list the Amazon link. I figure that if someone really wants to buy it somewhere else (because of the perks, etc), then they'll take a quick peak over there regardless of what I link to. But for the more casual reader who doesn't particularly care which store she purchases at, I point them to Amazon, since that's where I get the bulk of my sales (and where I hope to climb the rankings).
 

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My distribution has been extremely focused ever since I became "published" 7 months ago.  Up until now, I have only sold on Amazon, B&N and Smashwords.  It has produced a low but somewhat steady stream of sales.  I'm now trying to expand to Kobo and iBookstore.

The sales beget more sales makes a certain amount of sense.  But it assumes that if a person is interested in your work and it's not available at the place they want to buy it, they will move to a different store.  I don't think that's the case.  Most people have a set list in their brain already about where they will buy an ebook.  Most of this probably steams from not wanting to create new accounts on every single site.  I would argue that the potential customer moves far more readily to a different work rather than a different store.
 

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I've run into an interesting situation with Apple iBooks. I'm selling much more on Apple AU than Apple US. Apple AU will probably overtake Amazon "Foreign" this month. Apple UK has also picked up. Apple US is poor.

If I judged Apple only on the US sales, I would rank them as dismal. Almost everything I sell is Amazon. But when I look at Apple AU and UK, it is very encouraging. Other than the refined tastes and preferences of Australians and Brits, I have no explanation.

 

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If I can only promote one store? Amazon.

I own a Kindle and share notes on Kindle and thus I like it when a reader buys my ebook on the Kindle, adds me (hopefully) and shares notes with me via the Kindle. This is a bridge to the author unavailable on any other platform (since I don't own any other e-reader).

With that said, I also want to support the little guys because I too am a little guy. I just blogged this in more depth for those interested in further expansion.

Also, I don't even know if Kobo will let me direct publish to them so I have no other choice except Smashwords to distribute to Kobo? I saw somebody else at Guido's blog mention the same thing.

In fact, it's been well over a month, going fast on two, and every other premium distribution outlet except for Kobo has my ebook in its store. I don't know what the story with Kobo is but I keep checking and it's not there. Smashwords says it's shipping but it's not there. Anybody else run into this issue with Kobo?

Alain Gomez said:
But it assumes that if a person is interested in your work and it's not available at the place they want to buy it, they will move to a different store. I don't think that's the case. Most people have a set list in their brain already about where they will buy an ebook.
I agree.
 

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Todd,

The problem is with Smashword, not Kobo. When you submit a title or changes to Kobo they are usually live on their site within 48 hours.

Kobo is limiting who they work with, that is correct. They do not have the capacity to work with authors directly who have only one book. It is not something they want, but they know their own limitations and instead of offering mediocre service to everyone, they rather provide excellent service to those they work with. It is something that may change in the future. So, yes, for many authors who have only one book in their catalog they will have to revert to third-parties to get their books on Kobo.
 
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Do any of you have experience and/or wisdom with regard to how long it takes Createspace titles to show up in brick and mortar stores?

I picked one up at Borders yesterday, and it made me wonder.
 

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Alain Gomez said:
Most people have a set list in their brain already about where they will buy an ebook. Most of this probably steams from not wanting to create new accounts on every single site. I would argue that the potential customer moves far more readily to a different work rather than a different store.
This. I hate creating new accounts, so if I can't get the book I want at the store I want it, I move on to a different book.
 

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Charliegirl said:
Interesting idea about focusing your distribution. I might do that when I release my full novels. But books like "tricks of the trade" I decided to use just to bring more readers in. That's why I have it for free on smashwords and am hoping amazon would make the .99 cent version free as well.

I figure i'd plaster the book all over because for now it's not about sales ranking, it just about getting as much readers as possible.

I'm actually doing way better on smashwords then I am on Amazon. That's because it's free on smashwords and I have been advertising the free book since it makes it easier for me to get readers.

But when I release the full book (hopefully by July 4th) well...I don't know. Making it available in only 4 or 5 platforms might not be such a bad idea.
Did you upload to B & N yourself or did smashwords do it for you? I'm a little confused as to how all that works too.
I suggest reading what Dean Wesley Smith has to say about it before you decide you dn't want your novel to be available very many places which is what "focusing your distribution" means.

Your choice, but not one I'm going to make.
 
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