Kindle Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do readers often ask you if you're really the main character?

I get this a lot, which is odd and disturbing because my protagonist is rather loathsome and wanted for murder.

I like to have fun with dark topics, so I am grateful to author Helen Smith (The Miracle Inspector), who gave me the chance to address this FAQ with a blog post: "Yes, I am the hipster OJ Simpson."

http://www.emperorsclothes.co.uk/2013/01/yes-i-am-hipster-oj-simpson.html

Check it out and share your responses to a common reader question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,600 Posts
LOL...I hope not!  It is a risk when you write first person, though.  I've seen lots of readers mention it in reviews, but none of my readers have said that.  I did get an interview question that asked if I was like the MC, but I lied and said no - we have absolutely nothing in common.  :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,274 Posts
I bear little enough resemblance to my MC, though there's enough similarities that I'm sure someone will ask at some point.

My MC is actually physically based on an actor. (All my major characters are based on real people's physical characteristics. I like to visualize, and having photos helps.)

But their histories and personalities are manufactured. There's bits and pieces of my life in various characters, just as there are pieces of others I have known, events I have read or see, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,262 Posts
JanneCO said:
I did get an interview question that asked if I was like the MC, but I lied and said no - we have absolutely nothing in common. :D
See, if I ever interviewed an author, I would assume that every character is the author. Even if the blood sucking serial killer in the author is supressed, every author walks the street in his mind at some point, stalking the victim, just to try it out. How would I kill if I was a serial killer and not get caught? That sort of thing. If there's not part of us in a character, then the character will never come across as genuine.
 
G

·
I am in fact a female warrior who wields a 20 pound sword one-handed, could defeat 100+ guys by herself at 15 years of age, walked through a dragon's fire breath, survived falling hundreds of feet and being impaled repeatedly with giant weapons, and is considered one of best fighters in her world. Yes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,573 Posts
That's always the assumption when you write erotica.  :eek:  Sometimes it's true.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,444 Posts
vrabinec said:
If there's not part of us in a character, then the character will never come across as genuine.
Unless we're just, you know, good at our jobs. :)

Weirdest interview question I've ever received, about one of my novels: The main character, Kevin, has this problem of sneezing whenever he's aroused, is this a real condition? If so, do you suffer from it? :eek:

--George, "yes" and "no", respectively...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,262 Posts
George Berger said:
Unless we're just, you know, good at our jobs. :)
If we're good at our jobs, then we know what that character is feeling, which drives motives, actions, and dialogue. You character's the CEO of a company, would he pour coffee for a client or would he send for the secretary? What kind of man is he? You can't go by "A CEO would do this" because I've seen some who poured it themselves, and some who didn't. The moment you make the decision, you become a CEO in your mind, you become THAT CEO, the one in your book. If you don't, then you risk depicting a CEO who might be the type to go out of his way that he's "just a regular guy" and have him ordering the secretary to fetch him coffee. Leaves conflicting messages. Makes for poor characterization.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,444 Posts
vrabinec said:
You can't go by "A CEO would do this" because I've seen some who poured it themselves, and some who didn't. The moment you make the decision, you become a CEO in your mind, you become THAT CEO, the one in your book.
The moment you think of your CEO as "a CEO", you've taken the first giant leap towards making her a distressingly boring two-dimensional stereotyped caricature, essentially indistinguishable from all the other shallow CEO-shaped characters. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
@vrabinec "Leaves conflicting messages. Makes for poor characterization." Unless that's what you're aiming for. Lots of people give out conflicting messages. That can add to characterization.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
From family and some friends, I get stuff like this:
"Well, I loved the part when you..."
"Did you have to...."
"I can't wait to see what you do about that in Book Two..."

While there are a couple of things I have in common with my main character (we both hate our hair and we were both rather embarrassed by a comment from a teacher in high school)...the similarities stop there. My mother needs to get the idea out of her system before Book Two debuts.... otherwise, she's really going to be asking me some awkward questions!

From people who don't know me well or at all, I get questions I much prefer, such as: "How many people that you know went into your main character" and "how do you manage to develop your characters in your head like that?"
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top