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there are arguments that kindles are better for the environment (trees, shipping...) and there are cons (it's a piece of technology after all), but the burning question i have is, do the writers receive the same, more or less royalty for each "copy" of their book published for use on a kindle?
 

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It probably depends on the author, publishing house, and contract.  If the publishing house already owns the digital rights, it may keep them at the same percentage (which would mean less money if the publishing house sells the digital version for less).  But if the original contract doesn't include the digital rights, they may negotiate it later either with the same publisher or a different publisher, which could lead to a higher percentage.

Lara Amber
 

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Welcome to the Boards, planyi.  I don't have an answer to your question, but I do recall reading some posts about that in past threads.  I wish I could tell you where to find them, but I have no idea.  Sorry.  We have plenty of authors on the Boards, and I'm sure they have some opinions on this subject.
Again, Welcome. 
deb
 

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It really depends on the author's contract with the publishing house. But typically, yes, the writer gets a smaller royalty for digital versions of their books.

It's a cost of doing business. It bites, but it is what it is.

 

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Thumper said:
It really depends on the author's contract with the publishing house. But typically, yes, the writer gets a smaller royalty for digital versions of their books.

It's a cost of doing business. It bites, but it is what it is.
Is it because it is the same percentage and the ebook costs less or is it a lower percentage?
 

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Thumper said:
It really depends on the author's contract with the publishing house. But typically, yes, the writer gets a smaller royalty for digital versions of their books.

It's a cost of doing business. It bites, but it is what it is.
I think it's all over the map. I've seen plenty of contracts where the royalty for the print book is 10% to 12% and for ebooks, anywhere from 25% to 40%. Same author, same book, just the different version.

L
 

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intinst said:
Is it because it is the same percentage and the ebook costs less or is it a lower percentage?
Depends on the contract, but a fairly usual contract is 10-12% hardback, 8-10% paperback, and as low as 5% digital. I've never seen a contract where the digital rights offered more than the hardback, though a few where the royalty was spread equally between all formats. I would guess that the big guns in the writing world get more for the digital rights than the average not-quite-midlist authors.

Self published writers, for the Kindle, get 35%--Amazon requires a 65% discount. So there's really not a whole lot to be made on a digital book yet, at least not on a per-copy basis.
 

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Easy reply. All of my books go for $ 3.99 on the Kindle and I get $1.40 royalty on each. At $ .99 (sale prices - on limited promotion) I get $.35 royalty per book. In paperback through CreateSpace (an Amazon company) it varies by the size of the book. Of course, I try to keep the price as low as I can for my readers, so my smaller books go for $6.50 and I get about $1.40 depending again on the size. A big 600 pager like The Jade Owl costs $15.45 and I get $1.04 royalty - the sacrifice of keeping my price low (whereas on the Kindle I sell it for $3.99 - discounted to $3.19 and I get $1.40). I'm into authoring and into readers, so I'll never get monetarily rich and quit my day job - but frankly, the wealth in authoring are readers. So with each token royalty, I get a BIG royalty. I get a READER. And readers are golden and reviews are platinum.

Edward C. Patterson
I shall never fail a reader
 

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edwpat said:
So with each token royalty, I get a BIG royalty. I get a READER. And readers are golden and reviews are platinum.
I'd flip that around; to me reviews are golden and readers are platinum.
And readers are wonderful royalties, but they don't pay the mortgage.

There's a lot of good and bad to the whole writing deal. In an ideal world we'd give our work away for free; in the real world we still have to eat, pay utilities, pay for where we live.
 

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Authors who are in it for the money will be sorely disappointed - and moreover, their writting sensitivities gets all withered and askew. I have had a few money windfalls in my writing, which I've earned, like the group that's paying my $2,500 to come read one of my works to a group of readers who have already read my book. But that was never planned. If I planned it, the quality would certainly have been below par, and it is the quality that got me such a gig ---  and luck --- and my agent.

Ed Patterson
PS: GOD is my agent.
 

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edwpat said:
Authors who are in it for the money will be sorely disappointed - and moreover, their writting sensitivities gets all withered and askew.
Really? I've never felt my writing sensitivities have become withered and askew; indeed, the pressure of meeting deadlines and the requirements of editors have helped hone my skills and made me (usually) a more thoughtful writer. It is also how I make a living, and I make no apologies for needing to be paid. And truly, needing to be paid for one's work does not mean one is in it for the money. It simply means it's what they do, along with what they are.

My only disappointments? The lousy royalties paid out by jaded publishers. Working 1-2 years and going through 30 drafts for 10% of the list. Or nailing an article, only to be paid 5-10 cents per word.

(All right, I'm sure there are others, but this *is* a thread on writers' royalties...)
 

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Thumper:

I don't earn a living by my writing, but writing is my life. Whether that makes a difference or not in the quality in my writing is a matter of debate. You are correct in one thing. The editors, agents and hundreds of professionals that I've been in contact with over the last 3 decades have been generous and made an impact on my writing. I'm not embarrassed or apologetic with the extra few thousand bucks a year I make in royalties and honorariums, but is not my first priority. Readers are. I now earn a living (the DAY JOB) in a greatly reduced capacity. I did have, until 2002, a high powered executive job, 24x7, with 6 figures a year (and was with that company for 38 years - still am- going on 44 years), but that drained my life away. They owned me and my time and mammon ruled. Now, at near minimum wage and 8 hours a day, I thank God for the employment and thank God that it pays the bills so I can pursue the reason for my life - an author with at least one reader - and that's what its about for me, having just one reader. Each reader is my reward. They complete the novelization process. Now with a few thousand readers, and the talent validation of the reader and professional writing community (I don't Indie publish because of rejection - I do not have a wall of rejection slips. In fact, I have some nice valedictories from other professionals), I am content. When you wake up in the morning and see the sun and the majority of your life in the past, you thank God for the ability to get out of bed and engage others with your mind. You never know when the sun will not rise for you and when the mind will wander to the mush bowl. At least there's something of me left with that one reader that I have engaged. And if there's some remuneration in that act, it's nice to have a piece of cheese cake with my baloney sandwich.

Edward C. Patterson
a boy from Brooklyn
 
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