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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When you've finished reading a book, do you read whatever information is placed in the end? Appendixes, About the author, characters reference, etc.?

I always do, especially if I have enjoyed the book.  :)
 

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It really just depends. I always read "About the Author" or "A Note From the Author" sections, but appendixes are a questionable thing. Sometimes, I read them first, and sometimes I don't even read them.

I will say that I don't usually read excerpts that are in the backs of books unless they are the same type of book or are in the same series.
 

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Depends on the genre.

I often look at the prefaces/forewords/afterwords and "about the author," and I find glossaries really interesting. I like maps for fantasy novels, but prefer these on the inside cover where I can refer to it easily. With academic or nonfiction, I always at least skim the bibliography. I am not keen on ads for or "samples" of other books at the back of the books I read, generally speaking.
 

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It depends.  Historical novels often include factual information about events in the book.  I read those.  I generally don't read excerpts from other books because traditionally (in DTB), these were for books not yet published and I would get frustrated that I couldn't immediately buy them.  (I may have to re-think this policy.)  
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
caethesfaron said:
I just read the story, I don't read any of the stuff before or after. I thought this was normal until I found out that my husband reads every single page of a book. I never thought I was missing out until he started telling me interesting things about how Ray Bradbury wrote Fahrenheit 451 that he found out from the author's note at the back of the book.
I guess I am like your husband, I am curious about "other stuff." Another aspect of this is not wishing to part with the book yet. :)
 

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Depends what it is and how dry it feels after the first paragraph. I almost always read excerpts, if those are there, and author bio / note, provided it isn't pages and pages long. I like backmatter with a sense of humor and zero self importance, even if topics covered are "important". Glossaries, appendixes, etc -- not as likely to read those, though I will glance at them.
 

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I don't read appendices, but I do love to read acknowledgements and any "extra" samples or chapters from new books.

If I enjoyed the book, I'm keen on learning more about the author's other stuff  :).  
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
RebeccaKnight said:
If I enjoyed the book, I'm keen on learning more about the author's other stuff :).
That's good to know! :)

Might not always work for me though as some of my books are very different from others.
 

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Yup, everything, except bibliographies. Excerpts from other books by the author are a great idea - if people don't want to read them they don't have to but they are there for those who do.

I have also seen clever offers, like 'Review this book, get another one free', which I haven't tried but I suspect work quite well.
 

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People who read historical novels tend to and I get irritated if I'm not given a bibliography or list of references. I've received a number of positive comments in reviews about my notes and character lists at the end of my novels.
 

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JRTomlin said:
People who read historical novels tend to and I get irritated if I'm not given a bibliography or list of references. I've received a number of positive comments in reviews about my notes and character lists at the end of my novels.
Historical novels or non-fiction historical books? If it's a novel set in historic times, I don't see why you'd bother giving the reader anything, because it doesn't matter how or where you researched the times since it's a work of fiction. If it's non-fiction, that's a different story. Maybe I've just never gotten to that part, but I can't recall any works of fiction that did that. Is that really done? I'd really like to know. My "other" WIP that's trunked is historic and I'd hate to think the reader is expecting it.
 

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vrabinec said:
Historical novels or non-fiction historical books? If it's a novel set in historic times, I don't see why you'd bother giving the reader anything, because it doesn't matter how or where you researched the times since it's a work of fiction. If it's non-fiction, that's a different story. Maybe I've just never gotten to that part, but I can't recall any works of fiction that did that. Is that really done? I'd really like to know. My "other" WIP that's trunked is historic and I'd hate to think the reader is expecting it.
I write historical novels and if you don't see why, you're probably not a fan of the genre. Of course it matters how and where I researched it and that I DID research it.

Lots of historical novels do contain end matter, but not all. I really dislike ones that don't. By the way, historic and historical aren't synonymous. :)

Edit: The excerpts of other novels and that sort of thing, I usually skip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I can't say I expect to always find end matter in historical novels, but it's usually there, and I enjoy reading it.
 

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Content removed circa September 2018 after realizing this forum was bought by VerticalScope -- a foreign corporation with seemingly suspicious motives and a bad attitude apparently attempting to grab rights retroactively. They can have the rights to this statement!
 

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Since Kindle generally starts you on the first page of the story, I often page backwards to view the blurb at the front.

I usually always read all the stuff at the back too unless it's samples of other work.  I either feel the urge to read more of their work or I don't, I'd only read a sample if I wanted to check the author's style.  If it's at the back of the book then I already know it!  I'd read blurbs advertising other works though.
 
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