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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Of course vets will always be the first and best resource when dealing with any canine disability, but owners have power too. As an owner of an epileptic dog, I've learned many around the house, easy tips that improve my dog and his quality of life, while making caring for a special needs dog easy and affordable.

I have not seen any owner written books on this topic. My questions is, what are your favorite owner perspective dog books?

I'll look forward to the discussion.



 

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Of course, not all dog afflictions are physical. Here are some dogs that are merely snobs:
"Why I keep a hedgehog as my pet"
http://coolmainpress.com/ajwriting/archives/1140

If you'll allow me to be selfish for a moment, it's just as well this thread was moved to The Book Bazaar, because in The Book Corner I wouldn't be allowed to say how proud I am that three teenage girls used the Hungarian translation of my novel IDITAROD a novel of The Greatest Race on Earth as a textbook about the care, feeding and handling of sled dogs when they started their own sled dog racing club. (Don't rush out to buy it if you want a textbook -- it's a novel!)
 

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A Dog Named Slugger by Leigh Brill
The Dog Who Rescues Cats by Philip Gonzalez
Rags, The Story of a Dog Who Went to War by Jack Rohan
Amazing Gracie by Dan Dye & Mark Beckloff
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I do think that there should be more dog books written by dog owners. Professional advice is always a must and vets will always be a major resource in pet care. However, owners learn from life experiences.

Some great book suggestions, I just wish there were more owner perspective advice. Dog owners have the true power to give their dogs the best life possible.
 

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Okay, first, oh please no-no-no-no-no, please not the Monks of New Skete Book! The methods in that book are not just outdated, they can be very dangerous, and in fact the monks themselves have since discarded the whole alpha roll theory. Here's the thing about the alpha roll. If you can do it, you don't need to (and it can be very demoralizing/threatening/scary for your dog). Conversely, if you have a dangerous dog, trying to alpha roll the dog could well result in a very bad bite. The New Skete book is a great example of a book that still sells but that should be pulled from the shelf.

As for books from a dog owner's perspective vs a vet perspective, there are any number of good ones. I love "And Bones Would Rain From the Sky" by Suzanne Clothier. Control Unleashed is an excellent guide to helping fearful dogs and calming over-the-top dogs, it's by Leslie McDeavitt. Clean Run publishes a number of general books (they are mostly focused on agility but many of these books work well for almost any dog). One of my favorites is The Focused Puppy by Deborah Jones PhD and Judy Keller; I did the book design on that one and it is a wonderful guide to getting a puppy off on the right foot training-wise.

A really good book for anyone wanting obedience skills is Schutzhund Obedience, Training in Drive by Dildei and Booth. While concentrated mostly on the sport of schutzhund, this book has a lot of great ideas to produce a dog who drives you to get what he wants by offering you nice behaviors like heeling and sitting. :)

The very best source for dog related books is dogwise, http://www.dogwise.com/

In general fiction, Nop's Trials by Donald McCaig is wonderful (if a bit far fetched, even for a dog as smart as a border collie).

I would be somewhat hesitant to get a book about veterinary treatments from a non-veterinarian though; it would depend on the recommendations and ideas. One must be careful not to tread in "practicing veterinary medicine without a license" land; there be dragons!

Oh and hello everyone. I'm new to the Kindle boards but am a 20+ year graphic designer whose passion and avocation is dogs. I own, train, and teach and and show. I started out in Obedience in the early 1980s, and through the years have done breed/conformation, rally, dock diving, lure coursing, tracking, schutzhund, and my big passion, agility.
 

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herocious said:
Where the Blue Begins by Christopher Morely.
Um, while I'm not home to check for sure, I think I just got this book for Kindle for free. (At least I hope so!)

It's now public domain.

Thanks for the recommendation.
 

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The Monks of New Skete also gave lots of good advice...which I'm sure they havent discontinued in their later books.

And the alpha roll isnt for any dog or any owner, but done appropriately it can cure (or re-arrange priorities for) a very dominant dog in one fell swoop.

I've only used it on one dog, our very dominant male Chesapeake Bay Retriever, when he was probably between 4 and 7 months old...and already a large animal. He was respectful of my boyfriend, but less so of me and not much of visitors.

I did the pinning, waited what seemed like ages for him to submit, and he was the goofiest, happiest, most obedient momma's boy forever after that, and my protector. It was an emotionally difficult thing to do....but I'm the one that cried after.

Dogs and horses have their own ways of enforcing and reinforcing behaviors....people can learn from these things...they arent being mean to each other when they do it...they are reinforcing necessary social structure. When people are overly, inappropriately 'kind' to their dogs and horses...those dogs and horses can become dangerous...and then abandoned.

I can see that roll going awry for people...it took a great deal of mental determination on my part to carry it out. And some agility in the beginning. Can you say...lawsuit?! I'm glad the monks and others have found more generally applicable methods.
 

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NatalieCMarkey said:
Of course vets will always be the first and best resource when dealing with any canine disability, but owners have power too. As an owner of an epileptic dog, I've learned many around the house, easy tips that improve my dog and his quality of life, while making caring for a special needs dog easy and affordable.

I have not seen any owner written books on this topic. My questions is, what are your favorite owner perspective dog books?

I'll look forward to the discussion.
You may want to check out Amy Shojai's books... She's KB member, experienced with pets.
 

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Not really for advice, but rather for interesting stories of all the different dogs the author had throughout his life:



A fascinating account of how some dogs were trained and used during WWII (and how many were returned to civilian life afterwards):

 

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9MMare, trust me, the alpha roll is not a good training method. Having taught classes for thousands of dogs and having trained my own dogs to fairly high level (top 10 ranked Min Pin in the country in Rally and Agility, winner purina incredible dog challenge 60 weave with my Dobe, etc.) I can tell you that there are many safer and less traumatizing ways to get cooperation even from a strong, tough dog. In fact, strong dogs often respond most favorably to clicker type training.

My heart breed is the Doberman, and the last two dogs I've owned have been from German working lines backgrounds. They are dogs bred to be extremely confident and physically and mentally tough and resilient. Here are some articles which may help explain why the New Skete methods are really no longer used, even by the New Skete monks.

http://dogs.about.com/cs/basictraining/a/alpha_roll.htm

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=984&S=1

http://tarastermer.wordpress.com/2009/01/21/why-you-should-not-alpha-roll-your-dog/

I'm glad you feel it worked for your dog. But it could easily backfire. And these days we understand a lot more about canine behavior and how to elicit desired responses without physical or mental trauma to you OR the dog.
 

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DD Graphix said:
9MMare, trust me, the alpha roll is not a good training method. Having taught classes for thousands of dogs and having trained my own dogs to fairly high level (top 10 ranked Min Pin in the country in Rally and Agility, winner purina incredible dog challenge 60 weave with my Dobe, etc.) I can tell you that there are many safer and less traumatizing ways to get cooperation even from a strong, tough dog. In fact, strong dogs often respond most favorably to clicker type training.

My heart breed is the Doberman, and the last two dogs I've owned have been from German working lines backgrounds. They are dogs bred to be extremely confident and physically and mentally tough and resilient. Here are some articles which may help explain why the New Skete methods are really no longer used, even by the New Skete monks.

http://dogs.about.com/cs/basictraining/a/alpha_roll.htm

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=984&S=1

http://tarastermer.wordpress.com/2009/01/21/why-you-should-not-alpha-roll-your-dog/

I'm glad you feel it worked for your dog. But it could easily backfire. And these days we understand a lot more about canine behavior and how to elicit desired responses without physical or mental trauma to you OR the dog.
I dont really disagree, and also believe that the monks have have evolved along the way. I'm using clicker training pretty successfully with my blue heeler. Dominant tho he is, I would never pin him....completely different temperment & sensitivity level than a chessie.
 

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9MMare said:
...I'm using clicker training pretty successfully with my blue heeler. Dominant tho he is, I would never pin him....completely different temperment & sensitivity level than a chessie.
Oh, I love heelers. Had a red heeler for years.
 

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I have a puppy mill rescue Maltese. She's 10 years old and has been blind for about 3 years. I never did find a good book on living with a blind dog. But she gets along fine, and even adapts to changes better than our dog who can see.  :)
 

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jamiedierks said:
Oh, I love heelers. Had a red heeler for years.
Noggin was half ACD, but no idea if that half was red or blue, as I think the other half dominated his coat (Pit Bull?).
 
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