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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a tendency to not blink very often when using the computer, watching tv or reading and so suffer with dry eye issues.

I had started noticing that since the arrival of my Kindle, my eyes aren't as dry while reading and I realized last night that I am blinking when I click to the next page. Because of this, I am able to read longer without discomfort and have not had to use drops for the last 4 or 5 days!! I believe I have discovered another pro for purchasing a Kindle!

Has anyone else noticed a difference, or is it just me?
 

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I've noticed a definite difference as well. I don't know how much is about dry eyes and how much is about the fact that the Kindle is much easier to read. But either way I sure prefer reading my Kindle.  :)
 

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Speaking as your friendly neighborhood eye doc...I have to agree. The computer is the worst invention for eyes since movable type.(Darn that Gutenberg!) (actually a computer is worse! )

Average blink rates for human subjects are 20 times per minute for normal conversation, but only 5 times per minute when reading or concentrating. This becomes worse when working at a computer (especially a CRT) because there are no page turns... no natural "rest breaks". Also since the page "turns" instead of scrolling, it gives your eyes a rest and a chance to blink/look away momentarily. I am guessing that page turns happen more frequently with the Kindle since I have read several posts that suggest increased reading speed with the Kindle. More page turns = more rest = less dry eye/strain.

Also a computer screen "flickers". you don't notice this because your brain smears over it, filling in the gaps (this is what makes movies work... but that is another lecture). However your eyes are making constant, slight re-adjustments for this "flicker". Pages don't flicker, I assume that eInk doesn't either... this is actually one of the things that intrigues me about the Kindle.

Don't even get me started about backlighting!

On a side note, I have always had a minor problem with allergies to dust and mold when reading old books, I'm hypothesizing that Kindle= less dust and mold= less sneezing!

So go tell everyone that 1 out of 1 optometrists surveyed recommends the Kindle for people who chew gum read.

Lecture over,

Jim
P.S. Wow it's hard waiting for Christmas, and I don't think she has taken the hints yet... even the blatant ones... I may have to resort to begging like my kids do!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
EyeMc said:
P.S. Wow it's hard waiting for Christmas, and I don't think she has taken the hints yet... even the blatant ones... I may have to resort to begging like my kids do!
Want me to help??? HEY, MRS JIM... Jim would really, REALLY, love a Kindle for Christmas! ;D

Think she heard me??
 

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EyeMc said:
Speaking as your friendly neighborhood eye doc...I have to agree. The computer is the worst invention for eyes since movable type.(Darn that Gutenberg!) (actually a computer is worse! )

Average blink rates for human subjects are 20 times per minute for normal conversation, but only 5 times per minute when reading or concentrating. This becomes worse when working at a computer (especially a CRT) because there are no page turns... no natural "rest breaks". Also since the page "turns" instead of scrolling, it gives your eyes a rest and a chance to blink/look away momentarily. I am guessing that page turns happen more frequently with the Kindle since I have read several posts that suggest increased reading speed with the Kindle. More page turns = more rest = less dry eye/strain.

Also a computer screen "flickers". you don't notice this because your brain smears over it, filling in the gaps (this is what makes movies work... but that is another lecture). However your eyes are making constant, slight re-adjustments for this "flicker". Pages don't flicker, I assume that eInk doesn't either... this is actually one of the things that intrigues me about the Kindle.

Don't even get me started about backlighting!

On a side note, I have always had a minor problem with allergies to dust and mold when reading old books, I'm hypothesizing that Kindle= less dust and mold= less sneezing!

So go tell everyone that 1 out of 1 optometrists surveyed recommends the Kindle for people who chew gum read.

Lecture over,

Jim
P.S. Wow it's hard waiting for Christmas, and I don't think she has taken the hints yet... even the blatant ones... I may have to resort to begging like my kids do!
I have dry eyes as well; mmy opthomologist says that the dry eyes keeps my occular pressure low. She gave me moisturizing drops for the eyes but because my pressure in my left eye varies by a broad range the moister eyes shoulod make the pressure increase. I wonder if the Kindle will do the same. Oh well, I'll just have to deal with it when the Kindle arrives.

ZU
 

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EyeMc said:
Speaking as your friendly neighborhood eye doc...I have to agree. The computer is the worst invention for eyes since movable type.(Darn that Gutenberg!) (actually a computer is worse! )

Average blink rates for human subjects are 20 times per minute for normal conversation, but only 5 times per minute when reading or concentrating. This becomes worse when working at a computer (especially a CRT) because there are no page turns... no natural "rest breaks". Also since the page "turns" instead of scrolling, it gives your eyes a rest and a chance to blink/look away momentarily. I am guessing that page turns happen more frequently with the Kindle since I have read several posts that suggest increased reading speed with the Kindle. More page turns = more rest = less dry eye/strain.

Also a computer screen "flickers". you don't notice this because your brain smears over it, filling in the gaps (this is what makes movies work... but that is another lecture). However your eyes are making constant, slight re-adjustments for this "flicker". Pages don't flicker, I assume that eInk doesn't either... this is actually one of the things that intrigues me about the Kindle.

Don't even get me started about backlighting!

On a side note, I have always had a minor problem with allergies to dust and mold when reading old books, I'm hypothesizing that Kindle= less dust and mold= less sneezing!

So go tell everyone that 1 out of 1 optometrists surveyed recommends the Kindle for people who chew gum read.

Lecture over,

Jim
P.S. Wow it's hard waiting for Christmas, and I don't think she has taken the hints yet... even the blatant ones... I may have to resort to begging like my kids do!
Good info, Jim/McJim!

Thanks, it's good to know we have a doctor in the house! You've got me blinking more already.

Betsy
 

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Thanks for the great information, McJim! :)

I suffer from dry eyes, as well. I was "on" eyedrops for many years, then had my puncti cauterized. It didn't help that I lived in Calif with the smog and dryness (I just wanted to hole up and die when the Santa Anas would blow) and then moved to the high desert in Boise.

Now that I'm in...uh, "middle" middle age...I have to bump the font size up on my computer, and have not read books I've wanted to read because the print was too small. :(

Now, with the Kindle, I can bump the font size up to 4 (which requires more page turns, and therefore more opportunities to blink) and read much more comfortably.

Hey Mrs. McJim, you gotta get your hubby a Kindle. He's in a great position to tell his patients that they can read comfortably again. You'd be doing your community a public service! :)
 
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Dr Jim/McJim...

You could get a Kindle(s) for your waiting room!  Just anchor them down so they don't get stolen.  How cool would that be to have a Kindle to read while you wait for your turn? 

Oh wait...um most of us do..  :)
 
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If listening to LR finish up the last hour or so of The Friday Night Knitting Club is any indication, dry eyes are not going to be a problem around here.
 

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EyeMc said:
On a side note, I have always had a minor problem with allergies to dust and mold when reading old books, I'm hypothesizing that Kindle= less dust and mold= less sneezing!
I can vouch for that. I have over 4,000 books, and a significant portion of those are old enough that I have to wear a pollen mask when I read them, and wash my hands frequently. I can hardly wait for the older titles to start showing up for the Kindle.

Mike
 

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I also have a problem with dry eyes, and the Kindle has made it so much easier to read. I love the ability to increase the text size, and being able to read what would have been HUGE books on my little Kindle!
 
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