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Discussion Starter #1
What do you have for a DVR?  Or don't you have a DVR?  If you have cable or satellite, was your DVR supplied by cable / satellite company?  Then what if you "cut the cord"? 

I've NEVER had cable or satellite.  I have had TiVo since May '04.  Could not imagine TV without it.  I love it!  Very very very rarely have a problem.  Currently have a TiVo Premiere XL box.  I've always gotten lifetime service with a new box.  Don't pay monthly. 
 

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I've had DVRs since around 1999 or so. I started out with TiVo, but right now I use DirecTV and have two DVRs, a one new one I don't like and one old one which I do like but has a very slow processor (the user interface crawls). I'm probably going to be a cord-cutter next year when my commitment to the new equipment runs out. I'll probably get a TiVo that can record from an antenna.

Edit: Thanks for mentioning Simple TV, Chad. That looks very promising.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'd never heard of Simple TV.  Looked it up on Amazon.  Reviews not so good.  Any TiVo can record antenna TV.  My current box is going on four years old and working fine.  Knock on wood.
 

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Sandpiper said:
I'd never heard of Simple TV. Looked it up on Amazon. Reviews not so good. Any TiVo can record antenna TV. My current box is going on four years old and working fine. Knock on wood.
I miss my old Tivo from years ago. The software and interface were much better than anything I've seen since. The TiVo Bolt looks pretty good.

I wish there were a way to get BBCAmerica by streaming, I'd dump DTV pretty quickly. But I gotta have the Graham Norton show. ;D

Mike
 

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We have Time Warner Cable and their equipment is horrible, since they're our only option we finally invested in TiVo three years ago and it's been amazing. We still occasionally have issues, but it's Time Warner and not the box.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
LOVE MY TiVo!  I got it when I was going on vacation and there wasn't enough room to record can't-miss programs on a VCR tape.  Up until that time, I'd always had paper TV Guide.  Had it since TV Guide began early in my childhood.  How do you watch TV without a TV Guide??  Got TiVo for recording.  Quickly learned don't need paper TV Guide.  :)
 

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I've been using Time Warner's dvr in their cable box.  It works for me (can record only 2 shows at a time), but I think the monthly cost is high, and my overall TWC bill went up a lot recently.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
mlewis78 said:
I've been using Time Warner's dvr in their cable box. It works for me (can record only 2 shows at a time), but I think the monthly cost is high, and my overall TWC bill went up a lot recently.
Time to cut the cord? I've always heard that TiVo is the best DVR.
 

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I was an old school TiVo adopter/fan until I cut the cord, but keep a few things in mind:

1) Set up is a little complicated (for some providers anyway, and this was still true for TWC about a year ago): you need both a cablecard and a separate box called a Tuning Adapter from TWC, and often the truck installers don't know how to set them up. (The installers ended up handing the phone to me so I could talk to the tech support line directly. This was 2014 or so.)

2) Again, unless it's changed very recently, you have to buy the TiVo box but you also have to pay them $15/mo for the channel guide listings. This is on top of a (fairly small) rental fee from the cable company for the cable card and tuning adapter. You are also in a one-year contract for the $15/mo and they WILL charge you the remainder if you cancel.

3) which brings us to: they make it very hard to cancel. You have to go through a retention line who will do their damnedest to keep you from canceling. Last time I had to cancel I told them I was leaving the country. They still tried to get me to just freeze my account for three months, heh.

Again, all of this was true a year or two ago; maybe some of it has changed.
 

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If I cut the cable cord, I won't be watching or recording any broadcast TV.  We do not get a good picture here in Manhattan.  I would rely on netflix, amazon prime and acorn (and maybe add a few things) through my intermittently-working fire tv box.  I still like my PBS stations.  Sometimes like to watch news, but I could get most of what I need in news from the internet.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
KeraEmory said:
I was an old school TiVo adopter/fan until I cut the cord, but keep a few things in mind:

1) Set up is a little complicated (for some providers anyway, and this was still true for TWC about a year ago): you need both a cablecard and a separate box called a Tuning Adapter from TWC, and often the truck installers don't know how to set them up. (The installers ended up handing the phone to me so I could talk to the tech support line directly. This was 2014 or so.)

2) Again, unless it's changed very recently, you have to buy the TiVo box but you also have to pay them $15/mo for the channel guide listings. This is on top of a (fairly small) rental fee from the cable company for the cable card and tuning adapter. You are also in a one-year contract for the $15/mo and they WILL charge you the remainder if you cancel.

3) which brings us to: they make it very hard to cancel. You have to go through a retention line who will do their damnedest to keep you from canceling. Last time I had to cancel I told them I was leaving the country. They still tried to get me to just freeze my account for three months, heh.

Again, all of this was true a year or two ago; maybe some of it has changed.
You were a TiVo fan until you cut the cord?

1. After you cut the cable cord / without it, set-up is easy.

2. Yes, you have to buy the TiVo box. They don't give them away. Buying lifetime service is cheaper than paying monthly. Lifetime is lifetime of the TiVo box, not your lifetime. If you sell or give away your TiVo box, lifetime service goes with it.

3. I don't know about canceling service. Never have and can't imagine doing that.
 

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We DVR, using the DVR from DISH Network. Love it - records all of PrimeTime TV automatically on the 4 major networks, and when playing back it will automatically skip commercials. Can also designate two simultaneous shows on other networks, and of course can quickly skip through commercials on the non-PrimeTime shows using the remote. We have two of those "Hopper" boxes, and smaller "Joey" units on the other TVs in the house. Yeah, we're over-entertained, but we do use them all. And we have Apple TV and Roku boxes.  :eek:

If not for sports we'd probably consider cutting the cord, but DH does love his sports - and we don't get a very good antenna signal here. 
 

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Sandpiper said:
You were a TiVo fan until you cut the cord?

1. After you cut the cable cord / without it, set-up is easy.

2. Yes, you have to buy the TiVo box. They don't give them away. Buying lifetime service is cheaper than paying monthly. Lifetime is lifetime of the TiVo box, not your lifetime. If you sell or give away your TiVo box, lifetime service goes with it.

3. I don't know about canceling service. Never have and can't imagine doing that.
Hmm. Re: 1, what's the point of a TiVo without cable service?
 

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I'm getting closer to cable-cutting. I've found I can get BBCA,TCM, SyFy, and several others through the Sling streaming on the Roku and that adds $30 a month to the cost, bringing the total to about half my present satellite monthly bill. You have to watch most things on Sling in real-time though, which is a bummer. Still, the only things I watch on BBCA are Dr Who and Graham Norton, so maybe it's not that big an inconvenience. They are both on Saturday nights. The search function on Sling is pretty much non-functional.

I'm thinking a TiVo Bolt for recording local programs, which is around 80% of my viewing.


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #16
jmiked said:
I'm getting closer to cable-cutting. I've found I can get BBCA,TCM, SyFy, and several others through the Sling streaming on the Roku and that adds $30 a month to the cost, bringing the total to about half my present satellite monthly bill. You have to watch most things on Sling in real-time though, which is a bummer. Still, the only things I watch on BBCA are Dr Who and Graham Norton, so maybe it's not that big an inconvenience. They are both on Saturday nights. The search function on Sling is pretty much non-functional.

I'm thinking a TiVo Bolt for recording local programs, which is around 80% of my viewing.

Mike
The various streaming apps I get cost me $36 per month. I have always gotten lifetime service with each TiVo box I've had, so no monthly charge for that.
 

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Sandpiper said:
LOVE MY TiVo! I got it when I was going on vacation and there wasn't enough room to record can't-miss programs on a VCR tape. Up until that time, I'd always had paper TV Guide. Had it since TV Guide began early in my childhood. How do you watch TV without a TV Guide?? Got TiVo for recording. Quickly learned don't need paper TV Guide. :)
You can find TV schedules online... some through TV Guides site and some through the channels site. As far as the DVR, this is probably the thing I will miss most. I have found myself reaching for my remote to fast forward or pause before remembering I can no longer do that. It was convenient but I think I'll survive. My main use was to record stuff to watch later etc but most of that stuff can be streamed so I will just do that now.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Cuechick said:
You can find TV schedules online... some through TV Guides site and some through the channels site. As far as the DVR, this is probably the thing I will miss most. I have found myself reaching for my remote to fast forward or pause before remembering I can no longer do that. It was convenient but I think I'll survive. My main use was to record stuff to watch later etc but most of that stuff can be streamed so I will just do that now.
If it's a question of $$, then save by not having a DVR. But If you do want one, TiVo is the way to go. It really is good. Buy the box and pay monthly for service or buy the box and get lifetime service -- lifetime of the box. If you sell a box / pass it on, the lifetime service goes with it.

Never having had cable, I don't know how other DVRs work. Have always heard that TiVo is the best.
 

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I mentioned this company in my thread about rabbit ears but since I see no one else mentioned it in this thread I thought I'd post it here too... It looks like a good alternative for those who don't want a subscription required device....

they also sell "signal amplifiers" for antenna users... anyone try these?

http://www.channelmaster.com
 

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Cuechick said:
they also sell "signal amplifiers" for antenna users... anyone try these?

http://www.channelmaster.com
I use a signal amp, although it's a different brand. I'm between 10 and 40 miles from the TV station's transmitting towers, so I have a 10dB (deciBel) amp and it's all I need. dB's power are logarithmic, so even though it's only 10, it's powerful enough for me. It boosts the incoming signal from the antenna to the TV enough that the signal received is great. Be careful though. You don't want to buy too powerful of an amp as it will overload your TV receiver and a distorted signal (bad) is the result.

Here is a great online resource for anyone cutting the cord:

http://antennaweb.org

You enter your ZIP code and it shows all of your local stations and their distance to you. It has other things on that site you may be interested in as well. Best of luck!
 
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