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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working in first person and including occasional meta-reference break outs.  I love the style, and am really loving working on this MS.

But it has to be handled with such a delicate hand!!  We are in the first round of edits now.

Starting next week I have to take time off to rest, and wanted to read some good examples of First Person Meta-Reference style.

ANY recs-- particularly available on Kindle-- would rock my world!
 

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oliewankanobe said:
Wow. The crickets are having a field day.

LOL
Let me be the first to raise my hand and say "Huh?" ;)

I think it's possible that many here have no effing clue what a "First Person Meta-Reference" is. I had to Google it and found this in wiki:

Meta-reference, a meta-fiction technique, is a situation in a work of fiction whereby characters display an awareness that they are in such a work, such as a film, television show or book.

Meta-reference in fiction is jarring to the reader, but can be comical, as in Jasper Fforde's novel Lost in a Good Book. The character Thursday Next remarks to her husband that she feels uncomfortable having sex in front of so many people, when he is confused because they are alone in their bedroom, she explains, "all the people reading us". There are several occasions of meta-reference in Jasper Fforde's work. In The Fourth Bear two characters lament over a bad joke made by the author, saying, "I can't believe he gets away with that." Some novels with first person narration contain instances of meta-reference when the narrator addresses the reader directly. Examples include Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, and Philip Reeve's Larklight.

So, I knew of the technique but had no idea what it was called. You are far braver (and more knowledgeable on the subject) than I, and I wish you luck in writing such a beast... 8)
-Joe
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
*sigh*

Fourth walls, and all that.  I believe yon tree up which I hath barked may, prithee, be of an erroneous and off-putting nature.

<-- removing stick.
 

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oliewankanobe said:
*sigh*

Fourth walls, and all that. I believe yon tree up which I hath barked may, prithee, be of an erroneous and off-putting nature.

<-- removing stick.
:D Like I said, most people are probably quite familiar with the technique (like at the end of the movie "The Neverending Story") but like me, have never heard the term before. I wonder how many non-writing readers know the difference between an "Omniscient" and "Limited Omniscient" POVs? Probably not many, although they read them all the time...
 

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Ohhh, fourth wall. Right, now I'm with you. No help though. To the best of my recollection I've never read anything that breaks the 4th intentionally. Good luck, though. That's got to be a tough road to walk.
 

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Okay, I'm still not one hundred percent sure of the definition, even after Joseph posted it (thanks, btw, cause I had no idea what it was at all), but *maybe* the Maximum Ride series by James Patterson. (It's YA, and I don't know what genre you're looking for.) Max, the main character, kind of talks to the reader on occasion.

Honestly, short of those books, I haven't got a clue. And I'm still not sure I understand what you mean, but that's the best I got. Sorry!


ETA: Actually, I don't think this is what you're looking for. Ignore me.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lemony Snicket is in this style... there's a BIT of it in Dresden's Butcher books.

If that helps.
 

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The thing is, almost all first-person narration IS meta.  They're telling you the story.  This is especially true of classic and very well done first person. (First person which isn't meta has no reason for being first person, imho, and should be third.)

I would say, if you want my favorite examples I would usually go for the classic hard boiled writers, like Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett (particularly with his Continental Op stories).  Stuart Kaminsky managed to bring that same sensibility into multi-pov third person, especially in his Lieberman books. 

And, of course, the most classic storyteller voice of all (which is what "meta" really is when you're talking first person) is Charles Dickens telling A Christmas Carol.

Camille
 

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I had to look it up as well :)
The only title that comes to mind is "Fool" by C. Moore. I read it several months ago, and I am not sure if the main character talks directly to the reader, but given Moore's style, it could be the case.
 
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