Kindle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 96 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
FREE Today & Tomorrow Oct 21st & 22nd at Amazon

Come, Wewoka
and Diary of Medicine Flower


by Edward C. Patterson
Kindleboard Book Profile for Come, Wewoka & Diary of Medicine Flower
The Trail of Tears left a deep mark on the Cherokee nation, a mark that still ripples through the descendants of that culture. It should also leave an indelible mark on the current conscience. Come, Wewoka - Poems on the Trail of Tears is a collection of heartfelt reflections on Cherokee culture during those days and after.

Diary of Medicine Flower - Cherokee Aphorisms is prose-poetry reflecting Cherokee views on modern life. Together, these two works provide a sense of the vibrancy of Cherokee culture that is far from faded, but is well worth the sampling.

Edward C. Patterson (Nv-wo-di A-tsi-lv-s-gi) is the author of several cross-cultural novels, including Bobby's Trace, No Irish Need Apply and Cutting the Cheese. His recent poetry anthology, The Clandestine Closet, has been well received.




Come, Wewoka to my house
And join to me your nestling heart.
Take my gift of hominy
And to the sparrows tell your tale.

This be my troth,
Forever in this city fair
Cosawta gives as solid oak
His sunrise-sunset pledge.

Our bones together to the eagles go
As our oath takes wing.

So, come Wewoka
Take with joy my simple words
And join.

$ .99 on Come, Wewoka and Diary of Medicine Flower

My grandfather was born in Sawyer's Mill, California and was 90% Cherokee and 10% Coastal. Although he was born on American soil, because a portion of the Cherokee sided with the south during the Civil war, he was not born a citizen. He needed to fight in France during WWI to get his citizenship. The Cherokee were granted citizenship in 1922. When he enlisted, he didn't have a last name, so he gave the government his last employer's name - who was a steamboat captain on he Sacramento river - a name that I have today . . . Patterson. My grandfather never learned to write (although he painted and sold his painting roadside in New Hampshire when he was in his 80's). Ironically, he married a cultured old-Salem family, my grandmother, Hilda Herrick, a direct descendant of Robert Herrick and one o he founding families of Salem, MA. She was disowned because she married an illiterate, heavy-drinking "Injun," bu the rest of the family joined her poverty when the '29 crash wiped hem out. It is fitting that encapsulate my Cherokee heritage in poetry, because my grandmother, like Robert Herrick wrote poetry, as did her sisters and my aunt. A recent visit to my aunt (who lives in Lynn), at 85, she reviewed my poetry and I hers to our shock - we display many rhythmic similarities to each other and to our illustrious ancestor, Robert Herrick "Gather ye rosebuds as ye may."

Enjoy

Edward C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I just received this wonderful poetry book in paper format. Worthy to spread the word about.

Rebecca Lerwill, award-winning author of Relocating Mia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
This book contain 2 works - Come, Wewoka, songs memorializing that ethnic cleansing act of the 1830's - The Trail of Tears & Diary of Medicine Flower - daily prose aphorisms from a Cherokee warrior in the 21st Century's perspective.

Edward C. Patterson
(Nv-wo-di A-ge-lv s-gi - Medicine Flower)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Diary of Medicine lower can be used as a daily inspirational reading, and was desinged as such.

Edward C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Today's Cherokee Word to the Wise from Come, Wewoka and Diary of Medicine Flower

The Feather's too Light

Rise up and take that step today - not tomorrow. Although tomorrow will not be too late, it will be late enough. Tailor your gait to the sunlight, the shadows gaining on you, if you tarry in one spot too long. Move out and up. Then, up and over. Mobility is a gift while you have it. If you wait too long, you'll watch others move along leaving you to bemoan in the dust your lost opportunity. Fire coaxes to action, but coaxing is not the end of it. Action is the end of it. Dead ends are self-inflicted hesitations, each one a brick in an insoluble wall. So, delay not for the feather to land. It falls too slowly for lasting success; too softly for permanent impact.



Edward C. Patterson
Nv wo-di A-gi-lv s-gi
(Medicine Flower)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The Cherokee Word for the Day from Come, Wewoka and Diary of Medicine Flower

Selling the Ground

They are selling the ground beneath you. Move along before you fall. The pit is opening and swallowing your home, your great hovel built by your own sweat. But you know that the earth cannot be sold or the air divided for use. So, why worry when they cut your heart with such unnatural pain. Even then, they tax the waters, the woods and the meadows, for the sight of fields dotted with the red poppy and the white daisies, yellow eyed to the sun. If you pick them, it is stealing now, for it serves only the ground's keeper. Even the place you rest for eternity is taxed, the soil leased to your dead soul haunting the shallow grave. Then you are loam and the earth enriched. Then, they come again and try to sell the ground above you.

Edward C. Patterson
Nv wo-di A-gi-lv s-gi
(Medicine Flower)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Cherokee Word for the Day - from Come, Wewoka & Diary of Medicine Flower by Edward C. Patterson (Nv-wo-di A-gi-lv s-gi)

Blood Kindred All

We call the written word Leaves in the Wind because we watched the U-ne-gas write and pass the knowledge between them. It was for that reason Sequoia made the talking leaves, the letters that we scratched in the sand to teach our children. We made the talk on paper, printing the first native News; and the U-ne-gas were amazed at how the savage would become enlightened with the simple stroke of letters. It was more than the gold in our Chattanooga hills that made them tear us from our homes. We proved to the U-ne-gas that we were their equals in all things, except one thing. We did not steal their land, as land belongs to no man. We had never lost the soil, just our precious homeland and the breezes in the mountains. We did not lose our written words, our leaves in the wind. They will haunt our children for eternity, U-ne-ga children now - blood kindred as we were, after all, equal in all things.

Edward C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Cherokee word of the Day from


Whittling Toys

Whittle the toys for the young ones for play; after all, you were once young. Now, they prefer to press buttons and run-a-muck in virtual worlds. But were we no different, dreaming of far away lands and taking spirit journeys to the ends of the earth? Yet, somehow, their play seems more frivolous, given the depth that reality collides within their playtime. So, whittle new toys for the young ones. Whittle them little horses and games of war to replace the death wish escapes that they have now. The old ways toward destruction are far more civilized and better on our conscience.


Edward C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Cherokee Word for the Day from



Over the Shoulder Glancing

Looking backward is something I do, but I shouldn't. There's plenty to remember, good things and bad. But that which is not inside me and brought forward is perhaps best left to rest in the bowels of the past. That which moves forward with me is not in the past, but here on my journey. No need to look backward when the sun rises. Yesterday's sunrise will be much the same, and at some point, I will notice it and bring it forward to my sunset.

Edward C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Does this book come in printed form as well. Have a couple of Cherokee friends that I would like to gift this to. They do not have a kindle or other ereaders. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thank you Kwajkat:

It does. Here's the link.



It also has Search Inside the Book, if you need to investigate further.

Edwrd C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Come, Wewoka consists of two books: Come, Wewoka - poems on the Trail of Tears  &  Diary of Medicine Flower: Aphorisms and Daily Sayings from a Cherokee Warrior

Edward C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Paint no more the children's faces.
Shame has come to the hawk.
The woodland bears are laughing
As we pass, baggage to the plains.

Time after time this play is played,
Now to touch the Tsa-la-gi.
The hawk rewards no feather.
The root yields not the healing
For the paint has dried.
No tear can resurrect it.


Edward C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
The author's Cherokee name is A-wo-di A-tsi-lv s-gi (Madicine Flower - thus the name of the companion piece - The Diary of Medicine Flower). The Cherokee language, one which I have not fully mastered, but know in fit and starts (it's handy at pow-wows), is one of the most difficult languages to master. It makes Mandarin Chinese as "walk in the partk."

Edward C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
The Diary of Medicine Flower is designed to give the reader a daily doss of Cherokee philosophy and wisdom.

Ed Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
My grandfather was born in Sawyer's Mill, California and was 90% Cherokee and 10% Coastal. Although he was born on American soil, because a portion of the Cherokee sided with the south during the Civil war, he was not born a citizen. He needed to fight in France during WWI to get his citizenship. The Cherokee were granted citizenship in 1922. When he enlisted, he didn't have a last name, so he gave the government his last employer's name - who was a steamboat captain on he Sacramento river - a name that I have today . . . Patterson. My grandfather never learned to write (although he painted and sold his painting roadside in New Hampshire when he was in his 80's). Ironically, he married a cultured old-Salem family, my grandmother, Hilda Herrick, a direct descendant of Robert Herrick and one o he founding families of Salem, MA. She was disowned because she married an illiterate, heavy-drinking "Injun," bu the rest of the family joined her poverty when the '29 crash wiped hem out. It is fitting that encapsulate my Cherokee heritage in poetry, because my grandmother, like Robert Herrick wrote poetry, as did her sisters and my aunt. A recent visit to my aunt (who lives in Lynn), at 85, she reviewed my poetry and I hers to our shock - we display many rhythmic similarities to each other and to our illustrious ancestor, Robert Herrick "Gather ye rosebuds as ye may."

Please enjoy Come, Wewoka and my other, larger collection of 7 chapbooks, The Closet Clandestine

Edward C. Patterson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,767 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
O s-da sun-a-lei. Ka-wi se-lu ga-du a-gua-du-li.
(Good Morning. I want some coffee and cornbread).

Come read - Come, Wewoka

Ed Patterson
 
1 - 20 of 96 Posts
Top