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I know this probably isn't the right board to post this on, but usually when I come here I only check this board for new posts and not the other ones, so I was thinking some other people might do that too and they could be missing out. Here's how I always check for free books. I go to the Kindle Store and click on the All Kindle Books link on the left side of the page about half way down. Then I have the list arranged by price low to high. Today I checked and there are 5 Free books! There is another free item, but it's just an introduction of a book. Here is the link that shows the free books. Hope this helped someone.

http://www.amazon.com/s/qid=1228826469/ref=sr_st?rs=154606011&page=1&rh=n%3A154606011&sort=price
 

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Yes -- what Leslie said! Some of the free books are not showing up on the Amazon list when you sort low to high. There are 3 books by Charlie Huston, for example. So go over to the Bargain Books thread and you'll find there are more books!
 

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Prague: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
Amazon.com Review
In Prague, Arthur Phillips's sparkling, Kundera-flavored debut, five young Americans converge in Budapest in the early 1990s. Most are there by chance, like businessman Charles Gabor, whose parents were Hungarian. But one of them, John Price, has the more novelistic motivation of lost love. He is following his older brother, Scott, intent on achieving an intimacy that Scott, a language teacher and health enthusiast, is just as intently trying to escape. The romantic hero of this unsentimental novel, John Price lives like an expatriate of the 1920s. He longs for experience (and more or less stumbles into a writing job for an English language paper), but even more so for the great, obliterating love that takes the form of the perky assistant Emily Oliver. Mark Payton, a scholar of nostalgia whose insights are touched with mysticism, seems often to speak for the author, even in his barely repressed desire for John Price. For who would not love the good and unaffected, in the confusion, opportunism, and irony that characterize fin-de-siècle Europe? Phillips's five seekers are like mirrors that reflect Budapest at different angles, and that imperfectly--but wonderfully--point toward the unattainable city: the glittering, distant Prague. --Regina Marler

The Foreign Correspondent: A Novel
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Furst's reputation as one of today's best writers, in any genre, is further solidified by this gripping historical thriller with echoes of Graham Greene, which opens in Paris in December 1938. Journalist Carlo Weisz, an expatriate Italian who's half Slav, is fighting the Mussolini regime by writing for the Paris-based underground opposition newspaper, the Liberazione. When agents of the OVRA, the Italian secret police, murder the Liberazione's editor in the arms of his mistress, Weisz assumes greater responsibility for keeping the paper running. OVRA also targets Weisz and his surviving colleagues, forcing him to scramble to stay alive while continuing his subversive work. Furst (Night Soldiers) excels at characterization, making even secondary figures such as shadowy presences from British intelligence and Nazi minders more than cartoon stereotypes. Through the exploits of his understated hero, Furst presents a potent portrait of Europe on the eve of WWII. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

Free-Range Chickens
From Publishers Weekly
Rich, an author and Saturday Night Live writer, delivers a punch-and-jab gigglefest in his follow-up to the similarly chaotic Ant Farm. A slim book of short takes, Rich doesn't stray far from his formula-many of these pieces would work as mercifully brief (and funny) SNL skits-but it's a formula that delivers a laugh on every page. Split into thematic sections-Growing Up, Going to Work, Daily Life, Relationships, Animals and God-Rich's twisted observations are often dark, especially in the Growing Up portion; "terrifying childhood experiences" include "peek-a-boo," and the people hiding in 7-year-old Rich's closet (Freddy Krueger, Chucky, a murderer, his dead uncle, and his doctor) pine, "Man, I cannot wait to kill this kid." Rich offers this brand of humor in a wide range of flavors, going, for instance, directly from Pheidippides of 490 B.C. to an "All-you-can-eat buffet fantasy" in the Daily Life portion. Still, there isn't much here that's not laugh-out-loud funny, perfect for rainy-day/toilet-top browsing or one long, painful guffawathon.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Murder List
Regan Hamilton Madison is perfect. She’s gorgeous ("a knockout with those full, luscious lips, to say nothing about the soft curves and long legs") but doesn’t seem to be aware of it. She’s rich (her family owns a hotel empire), but as head of her family’s foundation, she spends her time giving money away. She even drives an old car. She doesn’t have a boyfriend, but she does have a stalker, a psychopath bent on killing her. Enter Alec Buchanan, a smart detective who just happens to be perfect himself. He’s gorgeous, "scruffy…sexy…he had impeccable manners, was obviously well-educated, and had a sense of humor." And he doesn’t have a lover either. Regan draws up the titular murder list at the request of a guru/messiah who preys on "rich but lonely vulnerable women" (it’s supposed to be cathartic) and who is the villain of a subplot. Although Regan is much too nice to want to murder anybody, she whimsically makes a list of the people she’d like to remove from her radar screen. When the people on Regan’s list begin to die, though, the plot moves into high gear. By that time the reader is pages ahead of the clearly telegraphed plot developments, and even the real mysteries—why Regan? who is the psycho killer?—are solved by the reader long before the characters see the light. Bestseller Garwood (Killjoy, etc.) has her shining moments, but she serves up a predictable woman-in-peril suspense novel this time around.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Caught Stealing
From Publishers Weekly
There's no end to Hank Thompson's troubles. Once a star high school baseball player, he's now reduced to tending bar at a neighborhood dive on Manhattan's Lower East Side. During his long life-skid, Thompson has picked up a drinking problem, a pair of bad feet, lots of debt and little ambition. But for Thompson, hero of Huston's dark, hard-driving debut, the worst is still ahead. It begins when Thompson agrees to cat-sit for his neighbor, a dubious character named Russ. Within a few days, Thompson is ambushed by a pair of Russian thugs who beat him so badly he has to have a kidney removed. While he's recovering, he discovers a key tucked under the liner of the cat's carry box. This turns out to be a crucial bit of information, as he realizes when the Russians return, led this time by a dirty police detective, and demand to know what Russ left with Thompson besides his cat. When they're spooked by a fire alarm, Thompson escapes long enough to get his hands on the stash everyone's after: $4.5 million in cash. But of course, his troubles aren't over. Bodies pile up at a dizzying rate but the mayhem is riveting, despite a few credibility gaps. Huston shows a masterful command of first-person narration, deftly chronicling Thompson's gradual slide from victim to avenger ("I'm tellin' you, Hank, watchin' you, it's like watchin' a egg get all hard-boiled. No shit"). The story moves with the speed of the best chase novels, and Thompson possesses a self-deprecating spirit that will keep readers rooting for him even as he edges closer to the point of no return.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

Love Me, Still
Forgiveness is the most difficult thing to give but the most cherished thing to receive. Beloved mate to two wolves, Heather lived an idyllic life until hunters destroyed the pack-s peaceful existence. Believing their mate betrayed them and was responsible for their father-s death, Cael and Riyu cut Heather from their lives. But when they realize their terrible mistake, can they ever gain her forgiveness and win back her love? Warning, this title contains the following:  References to m/f/m relationship

Also Made to Stick is still free (its been free ever since I first got my kindle a month and a half ago.
I order all of the freebies expect for Love Me, Still. Debating whether or not I am really going to read it.
 
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I was going to make links to these books but they are free..no kick back to the forum so it doesn't seem to be needed.

This one looks like it may be fun.



I also got both Charlie Houston books. They sounded interesting. I they suck, I lost nothing!

Thanks for posting these!
 

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Just so everyone knows these books are already posted in The Book Corner under Free Books. Betsy is working diligently today merging posts in order to keep the boards user friendly. Thanks for your understanding and patience.  :)

Linda
 

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Vampyre,

There are three Charlie Huston books. It is all 3 of the trilogy. I got them all this morning. I already had Garwood's book as I love her books. Got a few of the other freebies too. Can't beat a free book.
 
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