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:eek: Wow! Really enjoyed reading this book Edward. It was a real delve into the teen mind as it comes out of the closet. I've posted two reviews on it already. Looking forward to reading another one of your books, The Jade Owl. That description has been intriguing me as well. Keep up the writing. Great thing about being an Indie Author is finding out about all these great authors on the Kindle board and on Amazon.com. It's a new world of edgy fiction that you won't find in the average book store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Thank you Tiffany. You have made my day. One of the benefits of being a Indie author is I can swim with my readers and enjoy the waters.  ;D

Thanks again,
Ed Patterson
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
No Irish Need Apply was the first book in American to have a public reading using a Kindle DX. June 15th 2009 in McLean, Va.

Edward C. Patterson
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
No Iish Need Apply began life (like it's two companion novellas, Cutting the Cheese and Bobby's Trace) as a one-act Play (unproduced) called In the Eyes of the Species in 1999.

Edward C. Patterson
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
If no one has ever heard of PFLAG (Parents and Friends of Gays and Lesbians), let me tell you - this is a loving, supportive orgnization. That's why No Irish Need Apply is dedicated to it.

Ed Patterson
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
No Irish Need Apply was the first novel in America, read by an American Author using a Kindle DX at a public reading. (Just 2 days after the DX was released). At Booz Allen Hamilton's Diversity Book Group, June 15th, 2:30 pm in McLean, VA - the reader , of course, was some feller named Ed Patterson

Edward C. Patterson
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Here's a snippet from No Irish Need Apply. Measuring the closet, from the chapter called Dare.

"Closets can be measured in various ways. Some are wide and walled with thorns, while others are narrow and restricted with girdles. No matter the size or scope, all closets are dank, keeping their prisoners wreathed in mendacity. Louis' closet was wide and thorny. He had become accustomed to its borders and knew the door was transparent. He was sometimes shucked through the edges and creamed like corn under a hateful boot and a wicked taunt, but he knew the contour of life beyond the borders. He ignored the fundamental arrogance that grew in his own backyard. That was Louis' closet.

Kevin's closet was narrow and restricted. Other than the shadow in the hallway at Union Municipal, his closet was bordered by a drawn window shade and a parent proof door. It had a physicality he could well define, but it defied the dankness. To him, now that his love had been consummated within his bedroom arbor, just a whiff from the Hollyhocks, Kevin lost sight of the lie that was forming within these four walls. His fears subsided when Louis entered this new world. He knew that when the lock was twisted and they reemerged into the living room that the secrets would be locked away again.

Louis had his secret down pat. He was careful not to raise suspicions at home. Louise never questioned her son's lack of girl interest, or his occasional bruise, or the hidden box of condoms stuck beneath his tube socks at the back of his top drawer. Louise was misted by her grief and daunted by the business of makin' ends meet. She managed to pay the rent from the Prom account, but was forever apologizing to Louis for touchin' the green that was meant for the angels. Still, Louise was rarely home now - now that Min needed an extra hand in the kitchen since Mum's death. Louise could have used that extra cash boost, but you know No Irish Need Apply. Sally Ann Poltowski was asked to help with short order (along with a nice raise). This silver lining did give Louise a stay of execution and double work (and more tips). These career concerns kept Louise even further from the borders of Louis' closet. Louis felt that if Louise had known he was gay (they say all parents know on some level), she would have run to the Palisades and tossed herself over the edge. It would be the Catholic thing to do, after all - the Good Book that paved one's way to heaven, condemned Louis to the hell-fire for his misguided love. Repent! Confess! Auto de Fe! If he had been listening to the Gayly folk, he would have heard that organized crime members, pedophile priests and a Borgia Pope or three made it safely to the Pearly Gates with no more than a tsk tsk tsk for their confessed, exonerated sins. Fags . . . well, No Fag Need Apply. No, Louise would never know about her son. Louis swore that such knowledge would be the end of her and the end of him and perhaps then end of the Universe. You could look into Louis' closet and see the prisoner within, reach in and give him a whack (as a public service), still leaving him in the bubble that defined his path; at least until he met Kevin."


Enjoy

Edwrd C. Patterson
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
The real star of this novel is not the two tennagers, but the mama, Sarah Borden. What does a mother do when her son comes out of the closet. The subtitle of this book is A Mom's Dilemma.

Ed Patterson
 
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