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Discussion Starter #1
FREE Today & Tomorrow September 26th & 27th at Amazon

Cutting the Cheese

by Edward C. Patterson
Kindleboard Book Profile for Cutting the Cheese
Luke Oliver has just come out of the closet and confronts a brave new world - a meeting of the Gay and Lesbian Activist Association of New Birch and Sipsboro (GLAABS) - your run of the mill, gay political caucus. Run of the Mill? . . . my @$$. Stepping across the threshold of the Otterson estate exposes Luke to horny and hilarious shenanigans that give the Boys in the Band a run for its money. Who wants whom? Who has whom? Who will win Luke's . . . let's say, attentions?

A self-effacing, comic romp through the Gay hierarchy, Cutting the Cheese is a reality check from the author's provocative coming out experience in a drizzled-pink world; an outrageous ride down the funny bone. Repeat riding is encouraged. It's every one for themself in New Birch's Gay Ghetto. To Hell with Robert's Rules of Order.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B0010K2ER6 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B0010K2ER6


Table of Contents

Slice One: Cheddar-Sharp
Slice Two: Roquefort
Slice Three: Stilton
Slice Four: Baby Bon Bel
Slice Five: Liederkranz
Slice Six: Neufchatel
Slice Seven: Mozzarella
Slice Eight: Camembert
Slice Nine: Provolone
Slice Ten: Gorgonzola
Slice Eleven: Velveeta
Slice Twelve: Brie
Slice Thirteen: Feta
Slice Fourteen: Jack
Slice Fifteen: Pot Cheese
Slice Sixteen: Mascarpone
Slice Seventeen: Gouda
Slice Eighteen: Ricotta
Slice Nineteen: Hickory Smoked
Slice Twenty: Fontina
Slice Twenty-One: Asiago
Slice Twenty-Two: Gjetost
Slice Twenty-Three: Reblechon
Slice Twenty-Four: Bel Paese
Slice Twenty-Five: Boursault
Slice Twenty-Six: Mimolette
Slice Twenty-Seven: Fromunder Cheese
Slice Twenty-Eight: Cream Harvarti

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Here's a few pull-quotes from reviewers of Cutting the Cheese - Revised for 2010

"Patterson, as omniscient narrator, understands that our lives and our relationships are full of agendas, often hidden, somtimes greedy, and he refuses to favor one character over another, even the newbie. A fun book (each chapter is named with a different kind of cheese) that belongs on every shelf." - Libby Cone

"The characters are vivid; (I'm certain I know one or two personally), the setting is masterfully detailed; (I could easily see it as a movie, or better yet... a theatrical production) and the pace; frantic and fevered. Hold on tight, because this trip through the lavender 'newbie shredder' is not for the faint of heart. Wickedly funny." - Timothy Mulder

"This is one nail-biting, back-stabbing, hair-pulling thrill of a ride. With the sweetest of love stories set right in the middle. I laughed so hard, I felt guilty." - Thomas Riccobuono

"Edward C Patterson offers a hilarious and engaging look into the challenges and opportunities one faces when coming out. Each of Patterson's characters are carefully crafted and I enjoyed meeting each one and seeing how their hopes, fears, desires, and manias would play out as the ever building collision course of personalities, hormones, jealousies, agendas, and love climaxed at the novel's conclusion." - Todd Fonseca, TMBOA.com

"With Cutting the Cheese, Ed Patterson allows us a glimpse of the Gay Hierarchy, as he calls it on the back cover of his vividly written novel. A very hilarious glimpse, but still with enough depth to linger." - Rebecca Lerwill

"Patterson's cleverness and sharp wit shines in this fast paced novel. There is plenty of cheese to keep the reader crack-ing up!" J.R. Reardon

"This book deserves to made into a play - the diverse range of characters would keep any audience interested, while the dialogue would have them laughing and thinking." - Yale Jaffe

"Although I am into Mr. Patterson's wonderful Jade Owl Series and the companion Sister series, there has never been a book I've read of his that is not written to the T's and whatever the genre plain wonderfully good reading." - ellen george, Top 1000 Amazon Reviewer

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Come and enjoy the romp.

Edward C. Patterson

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B0010K2ER6 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B0010K2ER6
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B0010K2ER6
 

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Discussion Starter #2
As an adjunct to the information above, here's an article based on materials from Cutting the Cheese.

Distributive Characterization - Deconstructing Luke Oliver By Edward C. Patterson

What if characters didn't arc, but exploded into mirrors of their probable possibilities?

There are many ways to develop a character, the most accepted, through the heroic arc, where the protagonist journeys and experiences events, people and obstacles. Thus, the protagonist grows. Another way is through stunted fermentation, where the character has grown and is at a frustrating impasse that is never overcome. Finally, there is distributive characterization, a method I use in my ribald comic novel Cutting the Cheese.

In Cutting the Cheese, the protagonist is a newly emerging gay man, Luke Oliver, still clinging to his ideals and somewhat fearful of every step he takes. He is thrust (self-thrusted) into a frolicsome gay envionment where various stages of his possible future development are portrayed by other characters. There is the over-the-top hustler, the pedantic, ambitious playwright, the snobby child psychologist, the nosey busy body, the wealthy sugar daddy, the jousting couple, the nubile gym bunny and the old, jaded queen. Call it the seven ages of gay men, if you will, but the hierarchy of possibility that stretches before Luke Oliver’s feet are like the doors of Bluebeard’s Castle. Luke is alive to them all. That he flees the scene (and not in terror) and survives by dint of his ideals (and the gym bunny), never precludes that he still might become a cloying playwright or steel tushied old art dealer. The only character that he could never become is the bulldog lesbian that drapes herself in cellophane and storms down the spiral staircase. (See previous post : The Case of Bambi Stern).
Distributive characterization does deprive some characters of their anticipated arc, but since they are possibilities and not final realities, it’s an acceptable literary gamble. It also serves comedy better than high drama, because comedy is as ethereal as life, while drama pounds the square pegs into round holes and disregards the sawdust. In fact, Cutting the Cheese, the dicing of sharp-cheddar into distributive pieces is just the thing for tickling the funny bone. It’s not until the cheese platter is dumped into the trashcan that the air clears for serious probing.

Edward C. Patterson

 

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Discussion Starter #3
I menton a previous article on Bambi Stern, so here it is:

The Question of Bambi Stern - Symbol or Stereotype By Edward C. Patterson

When I first came out of the closet and took up the mantle of Gay Activism, I was set to my first important task - cutting blocks of cheese into small cubes to be served at an executive board meeting.

Lately, there has been some discussion on the character of Bambi Stern in my novel Cutting the Cheese. Bambi is a hefty Lesbian, who smokes cigars, wears a man's suit and fedora, and is motivated by cocktail weenies. She is also the president of the Gay & Lesbian Activists of New Birch and Sipsboro. The character has caused some anxiety (not to say, resentment) in some quarters of the Gay Community. Of course, the novel is my "bad boy" work, which goes out of its way to highlight many of the more outrageous foibles found in the Gay Social order. Without doubt, the various characters are based on people I met when I first emerged from the closet. The community, being mapless otherwise, has created its own clue set for any newbie on the scene, who would need a pink compass for navigation otherwise. So, while some characters like Kelly Rodriguez, the snippy hustler or the even cringing Paddy can be received with wicked laughter, when some confront Bambi Stern, the portrayal cuts just too close to the bone. Harumph. Stereotypes. Truth be told, of all the characters in Cutting the Cheese, Bambi Stern is closest to the real life Lesbian she is based upon.

When I first came out of the closet and took up the mantle of Gay Activism, I was set to my first important task - cutting blocks of cheese into small cubes to be served at an executive board meeting. It was an important task, because it tapped into the heart of gossip and provided my first glimpse into the nelly, campy world. It scared the bejeebers out of me. Then I was comfronted by the president of the group, who roared with her bull-moose voice, slapped all the fairy backs and was famous for having made an entrance at a fabled party by strutting down a staircase wrapped in naught but cellophane. If I left Bambi Stern out of Cutting the Cheese, I might as well scrapped the book. Of course, while most readers find outrageous humor by looking in the mirror, some do not, and had even suggested I withdraw the work from review. One reviewer stated (code) "there were issues with this story that took away from my complete enjoyment." Such reaction only encourages me to step up to the plate and dish out some more. Thin skins beware.

The question here is "what is a stereotype?" I often wonder about this. Is a stereotype a cruel set of crude and rude attributes grafted on scapegoats to make them bigger targets, or are they a collection of traits that communities adopt for identity? It's a fine line, but having caroused at Gay Activist meetings and at the general mayhem of a Gay Pride celebration, my observations record that members of the gay community tend to slip into camp whenever they feel the need. It's the yellow brick road to our own private OZ. Therefore, Bambi Stern and her Edward G. Robinson cigar manner is a living, breathing reminder to my gay friends (and enemies) that we haven't cornered the market on self-righteousness. We need to be proud of identities no matter how much cellophane we wear. 'Nuff said? Not nearly.

Edward C. Patterson
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Cutting the Cheese is a hilarious peek at gay sub-culture that will keep you laughing through the stormy days of April. Unitl 4/25/09 - Ed Patterson's Bad Boy novel is available for only $ .99
 

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I'm a sucker for something with a 99 cent price tag...  I just one-clicked.
Looking forward to reading it.
 

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Okay, Ed,
I couldn't resist. I just bought Cutting The Cheese. I'm probably going to have to go on a 12 step program if you don't stop writing books.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you Linda. 12 steps eh? You know on May 7th I'll be publishing The Dragon's Pool, my 12th Book - one book for each step. lol

Edward C. Patterson
 

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I've read several of Ed's book, but I haven't opened this one yet....cool!  Now I have a good book to read this weekend!  Thanks!
 

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Hi Ed,

I really enjoyed reading 'Surviving an American Gulag' because I fell in love with the characters.

I haven't had the chance to get to this book yet, but I hear the characters are portrayed well.  I'm anxious to meet them for myself.

Esme.

 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well Esmeluv:

In Surviving an American Gulag, you meet me, because it's autobiographical. In Cutting the heese, you meet . . . ME, because it's also autobiographical, but I'll be the last one to admit it. (Whoops, I guess I'm the last person who did).

Edward C. Patterson
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I remember my first Gay Activist meeting. I was handed a knife and a block of cheese, and then instructed on how to cut the cheese into perfect squares to be served to the membership. Well, I soon found out that the slice and dice committee — the old queens of dairy products, was just an excuse to gossip and flirt and . . . well, I won't spoil the fun.

Edward C. Patterson
 
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