Kindle Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,417 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I only say this now I realise how important sight is to wriiting, though no doubt there is software for you to dictate your work.

I've never had dyslexia and I'm now of an age where I am retired, but recently I find that when I post on here without spellcheck on my computer, even if I double check, I leave errors, and so have to edi myt posts numerous times on occasions, I can't see that I am mixing up letters in words (wrods - just corrected) Also another is form instead of from, but it applies to many words.

This all happened after I broke one of my lenses in my glasses, and with covid rampant, I've not dared go to the opticians. However, I did today and ordered some glasses, During the test I explained the problem and he said I have catatracts forming and have high pressure, whatever that means. All of it possible to resolve, thank goodness. He said everything should be back to normal when I get my new glasses until I have to have the cataracts removed at sometime in the futire. It just shows how lucky authors are to have good sight, but I imagine other authors have to overcome other difficulties.

Writing this with one lense and my left eye closed, lol. Call it dedication.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
My understanding is, after a certain age, cataracts are common and seldom progress to a point where one needs surgery. If they do, it's no big deal, especially if well insured.

I suspected cataracts a year ago due to random blurry vision. During an exam, though nascent cataracts were present, the doctor said the blurriness was due to "Meibomian Gland Dysfunction"--clogged ducts. The remedy involved massaging my eyelids with a warm washcloth every morning. Unfortunately, this does not cure typos.

My rheumatoid arthritis poses a bigger challenge. The middle finger of my right hand no longer cooperates when typing. Initially, this was a big problem, me being a "writer" of sorts. But I've adapted and only notice my disability when the finger unintentionally strikes the "9" key when the "i" key is the intended target. It's a nuisance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
The optician warned me about cataracts some time ago but I didn't realise one of them had got dramatically worse until I was driving in the dark along a street with not very much street lighting to visit my husband in hospital, and I suddenly found that when a steady stream of cars came towards me with their headlights on I literally couldn't see a thing. I thought for a while I might have to leave the car at the hospital and take the bus home, but I decided I would have to drive home, and I chose a better-lit route with less traffic and it was ok. But that made me go back to the optician and get something done about it - I had one of the cataracts removed about 18 months ago and the result was quite dramatic - I didn't need to wear glasses for driving at all afterwards. I think I will have to get the other eye operated on sooner or later, but the operation itself is nothing to worry about so I am fine with that. (Just posting here in case anyone else should find themselves in a similarly dangerous situation)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,417 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
My understanding is, after a certain age, cataracts are common and seldom progress to a point where one needs surgery. If they do, it's no big deal, especially if well insured.

I suspected cataracts a year ago due to random blurry vision. During an exam, though nascent cataracts were present, the doctor said the blurriness was due to "Meibomian Gland Dysfunction"--clogged ducts. The remedy involved massaging my eyelids with a warm washcloth every morning. Unfortunately, this does not cure typos.

My rheumatoid arthritis poses a bigger challenge. The middle finger of my right hand no longer cooperates when typing. Initially, this was a big problem, me being a "writer" of sorts. But I've adapted and only notice my disability when the finger unintentionally strikes the "9" key when the "i" key is the intended target. It's a nuisance.
Thanks for sharing. Never thought about arthritis. I can imagine that would be difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,417 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The optician warned me about cataracts some time ago but I didn't realise one of them had got dramatically worse until I was driving in the dark along a street with not very much street lighting to visit my husband in hospital, and I suddenly found that when a steady stream of cars came towards me with their headlights on I literally couldn't see a thing. I thought for a while I might have to leave the car at the hospital and take the bus home, but I decided I would have to drive home, and I chose a better-lit route with less traffic and it was ok. But that made me go back to the optician and get something done about it - I had one of the cataracts removed about 18 months ago and the result was quite dramatic - I didn't need to wear glasses for driving at all afterwards. I think I will have to get the other eye operated on sooner or later, but the operation itself is nothing to worry about so I am fine with that. (Just posting here in case anyone else should find themselves in a similarly dangerous situation)
I've heard the operation is standard. I know my brother had it done and he soon had his vision back, That's a good cautionary story, so thanks for sharing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I have rheumatoid arthritis (worst in my hands) and tendonitis in both wrists. Dictating has been a big help, although I'm looking forward to when I can afford Dragon Dictation down the road, as I'm currently just using Apple's built in software which could use some improvement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,417 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I have rheumatoid arthritis (worst in my hands) and tendonitis in both wrists. Dictating has been a big help, although I'm looking forward to when I can afford Dragon Dictation down the road, as I'm currently just using Apple's built in software which could use some improvement.
Just been over to look at Dragon Dictation software, it is expensive for the professional version, around $500. Not sure h0w good the versions are at $50. There are some on eBay cheaper, but I don't know which versions they are. I'm guessing they must have some way to change words and edit?.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Yup. I have fibromyalgia, back issues from a car accident, and other stuff wrong with me. It makes me super slow and prone to a few weird goof-ups here and there in self-publishing. Totally borked my second book release by not noticing the file was a mess for at least a month. The only good thing about having a jacked up body is that it keeps me from constantly comparing myself to other writers. I have to do things at my own pace, and judging my progress based on what others are doing will impede my own writing journey.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AntoniaOverstreet

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Just been over to look at Dragon Dictation software, it is expensive for the professional version, around $500. Not sure h0w good the versions are at $50. There are some on eBay cheaper, but I don't know which versions they are. I'm guessing they must have some way to change words and edit?.
Yeah, the version I wanted just jumped from $300 to $500. My understanding is that you can't train the cheaper versions to learn how you pronounce things—which would be the main advantage over what I'm currently using.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,417 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Yup. I have fibromyalgia, back issues from a car accident, and other stuff wrong with me. It makes me super slow and prone to a few weird goof-ups here and there in self-publishing. Totally borked my second book release by not noticing the file was a mess for at least a month. The only good thing about having a jacked up body is that it keeps me from constantly comparing myself to other writers. I have to do things at my own pace, and judging my progress based on what others are doing will impede my own writing journey.
Sorry to hear that. I know it helps me writing to lose myself. I'm never depressed and as someone retired, I am 24/7 on my computer writing. Do you find writing helps to ward off depression if not the pain of a bad back?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,417 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yeah, the version I wanted just jumped from $300 to $500. My understanding is that you can't train the cheaper versions to learn how you pronounce things—which would be the main advantage over what I'm currently using.
That price increase is terrible when it's such a valuable tool as a necessity for a disability. Hope you manage to get the $$$ toigether eventually to get a hold of it. Maybe try a go fund me page.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top