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I downloaded a sample of The Help because it's received 130 reviews on Amazon with 5 stars and the topic is of interest to me. It's written in the dialect of what could best be described, I suppose, as an uneducated black woman in the early '60s, who is working as domestic help. I'm drawn to the book by the sample, but wonder if I can handle reading what is almost a different language throughout the entire book. Part of me says it's worth it; the other part says it's a bit of a struggle. I've bought so many books lately, I'd sure love someone else to weigh in. Thanks!
 

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libro said:
I downloaded a sample of The Help because it's received 130 reviews on Amazon with 5 stars and the topic is of interest to me. It's written in the dialect of what could best be described, I suppose, as an uneducated black woman in the early '60s, who is working as domestic help. I'm drawn to the book by the sample, but wonder if I can handle reading what is almost a different language throughout the entire book. Part of me says it's worth it; the other part says it's a bit of a struggle. I've bought so many books lately, I'd sure love someone else to weigh in. Thanks!
I think you can. I read Letters from a Slave Girl which was what I would imagine to be close to the same dialect or perhaps more challenging since it was in the early 1900.s. One of the best but saddest books I've ever read. It was a .99 book and I will read it again and again because of the story. I still tear up when I think of it. Highly recommend. I one klicked "The Help."

 

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I think The Help was the 2nd book I read on my new Kindle, and I really enjoyed it. Some times it is sad, some times it made me angry, and I laughed out loud several times. I thought it was great and would highly recommend it. Also, the story is told by several different women, some are not well educated, some are but I didn't have any trouble understanding what was being said at all. Excellent book!! Jeni
 

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libro said:
It's written in the dialect of what could best be described, I suppose, as an uneducated black woman in the early '60s, who is working as domestic help.
I read the sample, but I will not be buying this book. One reviewer perfectly summed up my own feelings about it:

"The author coats Abiliene's diction with broken English (which is acceptable considering the region and era); but her attempt at the African American vernacular left me a bit frustrated and insulted. She uses a somewhat different choice of words using phonetically yet functionally incorrect substitutes (if there is a literary term for this, I obviously do not know what it is). It may be a nit that bothered only me, but to clarify, here's an example: Law = Lord, a course = of course, spec = expect, and doe-nob = doorknob. This "pitch perfect voice" (as described on the back flap) of the the childless, faithful, church-going, make-everything-all-right-for-the-white-folk, black maid -- was a bit too much for me in roughly ten pages. I was sorely disappointed in Aibileen's voice and her story from the onset; I lost interest immediately. I closed the book attempting to flush the stereotypical modern day "mammy" image from my mind!"
 

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Britt said:
This "pitch perfect voice" (as described on the back flap) of the the childless, faithful, church-going, make-everything-all-right-for-the-white-folk, black maid -- was a bit too much for me in roughly ten pages. I was sorely disappointed in Aibileen's voice and her story from the onset; I lost interest immediately."
It really isn't a different language. I can agree with the pitch perfect voice criticism, but I found Aibileen to be NOT a 'childless, make-everything-all-right-for- the-white-folk' character. I thought the book to be insightful in many ways, although perhaps too anxious to have a heroine white person. Nonetheless, I'm glad I read it.

For me, it was worth the 9.99.
 

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libro said:
I downloaded a sample of The Help because it's received 130 reviews on Amazon with 5 stars and the topic is of interest to me. It's written in the dialect of what could best be described, I suppose, as an uneducated black woman in the early '60s, who is working as domestic help. I'm drawn to the book by the sample, but wonder if I can handle reading what is almost a different language throughout the entire book. Part of me says it's worth it; the other part says it's a bit of a struggle. I've bought so many books lately, I'd sure love someone else to weigh in. Thanks!
I REALLY enjoyed this book and had a hard time putting it down, so much so that this was the first book I really tried out the TTS on. TTS was very interesting as there is alot of southern dialect used in the book. :)
 

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I'm seeing this a bit late, but I LOVED this book! I lent it to my mom (it was a DTV), and she adored it, too.

The dialect was a little hard to get through at first, but you get used to it after a little while.
 

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Another thing to note, the whole book is not written in that style,  There are a couple different viewpoints in the book, that of Skeeter, Aibileen, and Minnie are all included.
 

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For what it's worth.....
I loved this book.
I loved the different voices the women had.
I wasn't offended by the stereotypical black voices.  Maybe if I were black I would have been.  By the end of the book, I loved all these women.  Anytime you have two cultures clash, there will be controversy.
Some people hated To Kill A Mockingbird when it first came out.  Good thing we didn't listen to them.
 

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I thoroughly enjoyed this book, gave it a 5 star rating and have recommended it to everyone. I actually liked the different "voices". I could hear them in my head and it made the story more intimate and touching.
 

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I really enjoyed this book and found it to be an interesting peek at a way of life not as distant in the past as you might think.
I had no problem with the vernacular language.

My only complaint was a "cheat" when the author wrote one chapter in third person.  Having chosen to write in multiple first person chapters, I think she should have held true to her format.  The charity ball was just not important enough to step out of the three personas she had created.
 
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