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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I have 7, and soon will be having 9 titles up on Amazon Kindle--I also have 2 titles on Smashwords that are not on Kindle.

I wonder how people with multiple titles handle their sales strategy.

My plan was to to upload my books first, and then to work on the sales.

But I wonder whether it looks odd to have 99 cent titles alongside 4.99 and 5.99 titles by the same author--in fact, I unpublished 2 of my 99 cent titles, fearing they might harm the sales of the more expensive books.

By the way, on the other subject of sales strategy--as sales have stagnated in the middle of May, I am planning to reduce the prices of all except two books to 2.99 or 3.99 until the end of May.

thank you,
Richard


 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mel Comley said:
Richard, I don't think it'll harm your sales having some at 99 cents and the rest of your books higher.

I think most writers with multiple books work it that way.

Good luck. ;)
Thanks for the advice. But my 99 cent titles are very short books, like "Lingam Massage: A Safe Sex and Anti-War Guide" (which I unpublished), which is more about laughter than about massage itself. Don't you feel that when someone buys a 99 cent title from your list, that has deprived you of a $2.99 or higher sale?

That was my logic, but perhaps I was wrong.
 

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Books aren't that kind of thing. If you sell one at 99 cents and the reader *likes* it, then they'll come back and buy more.

The risk is that they'll *not* like it at 99 cents and never look at you again.

JMO. YMMV.
 

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The pricing problem is a sticky one--there have been lots of board discussions about it. I, for one, read Konrath's blog for a while before I published and I chose to start at $1.99 (thinking that I could always drop it later if sales were low, but I could never recoup lost income if I began at a lower price and sales were brisk). The other criteria I used, though, was that so many of the .99 books I read or got samples of were either short stories or novelettes, while mine was well over 100,000 words--I felt like a lower price might indicate a shorter work, and be inappropriate (this, I do not know the "norms" about). My biggest problem, strategically, is that I won't have access to sales figures for about 3 months (because I distributed through BookBaby), so I can't see (or even guess) what my choice has caused to happen. Now, I'm preparing 2 additional titles for publication, and am fearful about the pricing strategy. Your question haunts me as well: What if I HAD priced my first book at .99 instead of 1.99? What happens if I have a future title at .99 when I haven't yet achieved the sales numbers I wanted for the longer, 1.99 title?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nathan, Dano, Mel: thanks for the valuable feedback.

I'll first have to make sure that the 99 cent titles are a really good value before I upload them. I am also thinking of a policy such as; first 100 books for $1.99, and then the book goes up to its regular price, or something like that.
 
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