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I'm a first-time author and hoping to learn how to structure my writing in an appealing way from a developmental writer. The higher the rate of a developmental writer, the better the skill. But, I don't want to go too expensive or too cheap.

I'm a non-fiction writer and my first book is a self-help one.

What should I aim for?

 

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I've known great editors who charge $300 and not so great editors who charge $3000 or more. I've known trad editors who would laugh at $3000. Bear in mind that a full developmental edit can be a month's work, so if you want to get a good deal you'll have to find someone who is up and coming, or who works very fast.

But a developmental edit might not be what you need.

For help with plot structure, scenes, and characters, then use a developmental editor.
For help with dialog, phrasing, sentence structure, you'll want a line editor. (A dev editor might help with those things, but they aren't magic workers in the same way that an experienced line editor can be.)

Prices are all over the map. Whatever you want to spend, you can find someone who charges that. You get what you pay for, but sometimes you get lucky. Find someone whose writing you respect and ask them who they used. Have a conversation with the editor. Exchange a few emails and don't be afraid to walk away if you don't click. If you get a weird vibe, if there's communication errors, call it off.

Also consider: first-time authors can learn a lot from trading and editing each other's books. I learned more from editing than I ever learned from writing. Myself, I can't afford a full edit, so I swap with friends, then I bring in a paid beta reader, some volunteer beta readers, and a copy editor. But my paid beta reader is a fellow editor, so I'm getting top notch advice.
 

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"Hiring a developmental editor, so what's a fair rate per word?"

Nothing.  Developmental editing is bull*^$%.  Unless the editor has personally written a bunch of successful books.  But then, if he/she has, what's he/she doing editing?

It's your story, not some editor's.  An editor is just a reader, whose opinion is no more or less valid than anyone else's.  Get a copy edit and a proofread, then publish well and move on to the next book.
 

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Michael Kingswood said:
"Hiring a developmental editor, so what's a fair rate per word?"

Nothing. Developmental editing is bull*^$%. Unless the editor has personally written a bunch of successful books. But then, if he/she has, what's he/she doing editing?

It's your story, not some editor's. An editor is just a reader, whose opinion is no more or less valid than anyone else's. Get a copy edit and a proofread, then publish well and move on to the next book.
This is false. Developmental editing can be extremely helpful, and many of the world's top-selling authors continue to use developmental editors even after making it big time. Almost all first time authors are going to make developmental mistakes that readers will catch on to.
 

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Using a development editor is what separates the trad-published books from the majority of self-published books which leave out this type of edit and go straight to a line edit for grammar, in part due to cost. To save on cost this is usually replaced by beta readers who in general do not provide as in depth a professional report and suggestions in nearly as much depth as to all aspects of crafting on a chapter by chapter basis, together with an overview of the complete MS. Development edits do not address grammar and punctuation which is a separate edit.

As someone who has used one, a professional development edit is an extremely useful exercise and I can imagine that it would save many an author from having their head so far up their rear end in relation to crafting their work that they couldn't see the wood from the trees as to changes they should make to their MS. At least that's what it did for me. There was nothing bullxxxt about it. As with all editors, it is upto the author to check out their credentials as to the worth of what they are quoting.

Sorry I can't help, but I wouldn't want to say a price as it varies so wildly and I have no experience of using one for non-fiction which I imagine is a specialist discipline separate from one who carries out development edits for genre fiction.
 

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Michael Kingswood said:
Nothing. Developmental editing is bull*^$%. Unless the editor has personally written a bunch of successful books. But then, if he/she has, what's he/she doing editing?

It's your story, not some editor's. An editor is just a reader, whose opinion is no more or less valid than anyone else's. Get a copy edit and a proofread, then publish well and move on to the next book.
I think that's what's called "painting with a broad brush."

Certainly there are many authors who have written great works without any kind of significant editing guidance. But to suggest that all good writers do so... is a bridge too far.

Tay Hohoff guided Harper Lee for three years, over many iterations, before To Kill a Mockingbird was released. It's fair to say that that classic novel would not have been the splendid work it became, had it not been for her guiding hand.

That's just one example. There are many others.
 

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yozzrulz said:
I'm a first-time author and hoping to learn how to structure my writing in an appealing way from a developmental writer. The higher the rate of a developmental writer, the better the skill. But, I don't want to go too expensive or too cheap.

I'm a non-fiction writer and my first book is a self-help one.

What should I aim for?
You can go on Reedsy and request a development editor. Before you select one, they will request a sample chapter and send you back a sample development edit response. You may find this the best way to find if a development editor is right for you.
 

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Pyram King said:
You can go on Reedsy and request a development editor. Before you select one, they will request a sample chapter and send you back a sample development edit response. You may find this the best way to find if a development editor is right for you.
Reedsy have a pool of top 5 publisher editors, but they are costly. Depending on where you are in current skills an average cost is 1,800 dollars for an 80,000 word book according to their website, whatever that works out per word. No mention of nonfiction books

I used a top five development editor for genre fiction at around 30,000 words for an incomplete WIP at around 200 dollars, but they were just starting out as a freelancer..

bubblecow. Com is another one I used 10 years ago as a novice writer and they were excellent. Many testamonials on their site. Current rates are 15 pounds per 1000 words. I'm guessing that is around 20 dollars per 1000 words. That works out at 1,950 dollars for an 80,000 word book, but it includes a line edit for grammar and punctuation once complete.

The owner has over 20 books published with many nonfiction historical books though they have other editors. Might be worth a quote. Don't know if they still do it but they had a mentor service for new authors. I was passed onto an editor with around 5 trad published books as a mentor.
 

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Blerg et al. said:
For help with plot structure, scenes, and characters, then use a developmental editor.
This question is for anyone.

I've got a vague notion of what a developmental editor does.

But can someone elaborate.

Do they compare your story to their favorite story structure and tell you what you are missing in terms of general plot points? Or do they actually give suggestions of what specific events should happen to fill in the deficiency?

The same question for scene and character development.

And what if you don't like the particular story structure they use?
 

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D. A. J. F. said:
This question is for anyone.

I've got a vague notion of what a developmental editor does.

But can someone elaborate.

Do they compare your story to their favorite story structure and tell you what you are missing in terms of general plot points? Or do they actually give suggestions of what specific events should happen to fill in the deficiency?

The same question for scene and character development.

And what if you don't like the particular story structure they use?
Every developmental editor can approach things differently, just like every writer writes differently.

A good developmental editor will make specific suggestions on how to improve any issues they feel need to be addressed in your story, not just speak in generalities.

Usually developmental editors will also offer a sample edit so you can get a sense if their style of editing is the right fit for you. So you're more looking at "how" they give feedback and suggestions to see if their editing style works for you.

With any type of feedback and editing, though, you're bound to run into a few suggestions you don't agree with and decide not to use. A good fit for a developmental editor is one you see and agree with a majority of their suggestions, but you'll likely never agree with all of them. And it's always the author's decision on what suggestions they wish to dismiss. :D

EDIT: I equate developmental editing to beta reading amplified - more detail, more precise, and it tries to address all aspects of a story (plot, character, conflict, point of view, etc) while giving specific suggestions on how to improve the story. Instead of just reader reactions, it's more well-rounded and thought out.
 

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Michael Kingswood said:
"Hiring a developmental editor, so what's a fair rate per word?"

Nothing. Developmental editing is bull*^$%. Unless the editor has personally written a bunch of successful books. But then, if he/she has, what's he/she doing editing?

It's your story, not some editor's. An editor is just a reader, whose opinion is no more or less valid than anyone else's. Get a copy edit and a proofread, then publish well and move on to the next book.
I get where you're coming from, but I don't quite agree. There's thousands of great English literature professors out there who can give you a 10-hour lecture on story structure and development who've never written a word themselves. A TV repairman might never sit down and build their own TV. We all critique movies and TV shows, but few of us ever make one ourselves.

A copy edit and a proofread is going to fix most of your spelling mistakes, but if your action is outlandish and nonsensical, and your characters are ridiculous, it won't matter how well spelled your words are if you never get cogent feedback.
 

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AlexaGrave said:
Every developmental editor can approach things differently, just like every writer writes differently.

A good developmental editor will make specific suggestions on how to improve any issues they feel need to be addressed in your story, not just speak in generalities.

Usually developmental editors will also offer a sample edit so you can get a sense if their style of editing is the right fit for you. So you're more looking at "how" they give feedback and suggestions to see if their editing style works for you.

With any type of feedback and editing, though, you're bound to run into a few suggestions you don't agree with and decide not to use. A good fit for a developmental editor is one you see and agree with a majority of their suggestions, but you'll likely never agree with all of them. And it's always the author's decision on what suggestions they wish to dismiss. :D

EDIT: I equate developmental editing to beta reading amplified - more detail, more precise, and it tries to address all aspects of a story (plot, character, conflict, point of view, etc) while giving specific suggestions on how to improve the story. Instead of just reader reactions, it's more well-rounded and thought out.
Thanks for the reply AlexaGrave. :)
 

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D. A. J. F. said:
This question is for anyone.

I've got a vague notion of what a developmental editor does.

But can someone elaborate.

Do they compare your story to their favorite story structure and tell you what you are missing in terms of general plot points? Or do they actually give suggestions of what specific events should happen to fill in the deficiency?

The same question for scene and character development.

And what if you don't like the particular story structure they use?
Okay, I'll take a crack at it, but this is a hectic time of year for me, I've only got time to spit out a response and get back to work today. You'll have to forgive my rushed prose. I feel more comfortable giving a bunch of examples than trying to boil it down to a definition.

I do a little of the things that other editors do. I'll catch typos and move words around like a line editor. I'll suggest new opening and closing lines to fix the transition from one scene to another or rephrase things to fix the pacing, like a line editor would do. But none of that is part of my job description. In fact, my best work happens when I'm sent a book that doesn't need any of those things, then I can focus on the developmental stuff.

As the name implies, I'm watching the development of the plot and the characters. Does a trauma that happens to character A in chapter 4 affect how she responds to a similar situation in chapter 17? If no, then I'll tweak her dialog so that she is more visibly affected in chapter 17, or I will recommend that the author add some kind of therapy scene in chapter 10 so that we understand why. If said trauma was caused by character B, then I'll be watching her dialog to see if the way she speaks to him and the decision she makes reflects that change.

In regards to plot, I've got a few genre specific plot arcs in the back of mind when I read any book, but generally, if all of the emotional notes you're trying to hit are sounding on key then I don't break out any sort of plot analysis. But if for example, the climax of the book feels flat, then I'll start digging into the character arcs before I begin with a plot arc.

For example, if the characters from before, A and B, have to work together to solve the final problem, then your climax isn't really about solving the problem, it's about them overcoming that trauma from chapter 4 to work together. If that never happens, then the reader is going to feel that something is off. Or if the chapter 10 therapy session, worked, then maybe the climax is about showing how well the characters work together. In that case the climax would show how character A uses something that she learned about herself to solve the problem. So in that case, I'm often drawing a little roller-coaster-shaped graph for the plot and the same kind of graph for each of the characters. If the tension and excitement peaks at the climax, that's the bare minimum. Ideally each of the character arcs should also peak at the climax.

Developmental editing goes way beyond that stuff, but the roller coaster graph is a good tool. I like to see it start out fairly low but with a spike of activity in chapter one or two that is your inciting incident. There's other models where they have a beginning action scene followed by a secondary inciting incident. One incident to draw the reader's attention, and a second incident to push the character out of their comfort zone and into the world.

I like to graph the buildup to the climax as well. The middle chapters work very differently from genre to genre. But hero's journey, try fail cycle, all these artificial frameworks that people use to talk about books can be used to assess it. It tends to work best when you have two or three big incidents, each with a high point and a low point, and each a little larger than the last, so that we get increasing levels of tension as we build toward the climax.

And these peaks and valleys in the graph don't only represent action. For example: It's okay to have a car chase in your middle scene, followed by a tense standoff at gunpoint for a climax. So long as the emotional stakes are higher in the climax. In this example, during the car chase, everyone is having fun chasing the bad guys, but at the end, there is a low moment where the sidekick dies. Then in the end of the book, the bad guy has kidnapped the love interest. There might be less action, but because of the sidekick's death in the last scene, we are no longer just having a fun ride, this is life and death, so the tension is higher. And if you plot each character's emotional journey, you'll want to see a similar spike in the main character's relationship to the romantic interest and in their relationship to the sidekick. If the main character is focused on their hatred of the bad guy and not thinking of the friends who they have lost and the love interest in danger, then you could say that both of those graphs drop off too soon and they don't have the proper motivation needed to defeat the bad guy in a way that is satisfying.

Here's an example from one of my clients, they won't mind me mentioning this. There was a character who spent the whole book learning to swordfight, and when the bad guy finally showed up, they pushed him off a cliff. That was an easy assessment: "Ummm, no, you need a swordfight here." And ultimately, we decided the bad guy doesn't know how to swordfight, so they wound up swordfighting someone else. But the swordfight needed to happen to show the reader that the main character had grown stronger and more self sufficient as a result of the trials they had been through. See, in this example, it was not just the swordfighting, but the fact that pushing someone off of a cliff was the old way this character used to work, because they weren't tough enough to face their problems head-on before, and the whole book was supposed to be about them getting over that. Thus, swordfight was necessary.

That's a small part of how the plotting and graphing works. I don't actually draw a graph very often. One in six times maybe. If I am gripped by the story from beginning to end, and don't sense any missteps, I might not draw a graph at all. Genres with heavy plot expectations like romance are going to have stricter formats and if you are saying to yourself, "why am I supposed to care about this character?" it's probably because they've gone off the rails.

Editing is an adaptive thing though. I've tried to standardize it, so when I do my Developmental Beta, which is 90% of the work I get. (Dev Beta is just a name I made up for a mini developmental edit. Instead of doing multiple passes, I do a single pass, it takes a week or so, going through once and fix as much a I can in that time. It's not as good, but it's about 70% effective for 40-50% the price. So indie authors seem to like it.) When I do the Dev Beta I make sidebar comments as I go along, usually these are best for catching plotholes. I have started to fill out a plot outline and do a short writeup for each important character, as well as plot, setting, grammar (A lot of that is more of a beta reader thing. I might not have any major changes to make to a character but it helps the author to hear: "This character is a badass. Good job of keeping it subtle and not going over the top." or "Hey this character is kind of a jerk, good job of making him seem extra mean. But I can see that you are eventually going to have him hook up with that nice girl, so in book two you'll want to be aware of his jerk reputation and see if you can find some humanizing moments otherwise a love interest will feel forced.")

For science ficiton and fantasy I often track the science and magic systems. If understanding how something works is important then I make sure the character isn't using abilities that are impossible, or using science /magic in a way that hasn't been explained. Or if something happens that can't be explained I tell the author how to "hang a lampshade on it." Which is shop talk for draw attention to this so people know it's not a mistake. Usually it refers to cliches, but I like to use the phrase when talking about intentional plot holes.

So for example, if something happens that can't be explained and the main character just keeps walking, that is bad. But if the character stumbles a bit and says "Oh gawd, I have to ask Merlin about that crazy pink fire." Then it has been "lampshaded" Ie. enough attention has been drawn to it that the reader knows the author is intentionally withholding info and all will be made clear in due time. And this reader-trust issue can pertain to character development or plot stuff just as easily. If the nice kid in school starts pulling girls' hair on the playground, then you're either a sloppy author or you are secretly foreshadowing that he is now possessed by a demon. If you can subtly "lampshade" it, you will have properly earned the reader's trust then they will think oh, the author wants me to know this kid is acting unusual, I trust them to explain this later, and it will be fun to learn the truth.

So that's like...a fraction of what I do. And some Dev Edits don't touch on any of these things because the book has other challenges. Which is why it's so hard to put a finger on.

My solution for this is that I only work with a handful of author who know me and I take on one new client every six months to a year. So most of these folks have done four to seven books with me and they know what they're in for when they come into the shop.

It's a holistic approach. I'm still learning. I wasn't very good at it ten years ago, but I got a little better when I was writing my own books and doing the occasional manuscript swap. Then three or so years ago I stared offering it here and I feel like my understanding of what makes a story tick has increased exponentially.

Obviously it's not for everyone. Right now I'm not open for free samples because I'm booked 2-3 months out, but because I only take on a few new clients a year, I offer a full refund for any new Developmental Beta clients, just in case they're not satisfied. No one has needed it, but it's something that I feel is necessary because, even though I am careful to vet authors via email to make sure we click, it's still an abstract process. And I can afford to do it cause it's a risk I only take a few times a year.

So yeah, basically I try to do everything that you as an author would do when you go back to edit yourself. The only caveat is that depending on what level your writing is at, and whether or not I am the last person to look at this before you hit publish, it might be more important to spend time on the lower-level pacing, phrasing, transitions, plot holes, than the higher level stuff like like tracking theme, plot, and character development. And I don't always know that until I actually edit the book, but my regulars trust me to do what is most needed and to be honest about whether or not they should consider further rewrites.

Wow, lost an hour or two writing this. I gotta get back to work. Again apologies for the typos and word vomit. It's not something I have a succinct answer for but if I manage to pull my nose out of this week's project, I'll try and answer followup questions.
 

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I do developmental edits for a few author friends, and they do the same for me. I also have non-author fans do developmental edits. Both groups catch different things. Imagine The Last Jedi if fans had been allowed in the developmental edit.
 

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C. Gockel said:
I do developmental edits for a few author friends, and they do the same for me. I also have non-author fans do developmental edits. Both groups catch different things. Imagine The Last Jedi if fans had been allowed in the developmental edit.
It's funny, because without knowing your stance on the movie, I can interpret this in so many ways. Regardless of your take on TLJ, it's hard to argue that episode 7 and 8 stand together well. These two movies are actually a great example of why you need a developmental editor/oversight. One movie does the mystery box thing to set up a bunch of questions. The next tosses the questions away and shames the audience for thinking they were important. These are not two movies that fit together as part of a series. It was a huge failure of management, especially since both directors are more established in their career obsessions with mystery boxes and subversion, respectively. Two things that don't go together!

I am a big fan of developmental editing... if you can find the right editor. As C. Gockel mentions, it is hard to find editors (or betas) who don't project their taste. You really need someone who understands what you're trying to do and helps you achieve it. So many people tweak things to fit their taste instead.

I had a good relationship with a developmental editor for awhile, but she moved too much towards tweaking things to her taste (and my books started selling less, not more), so I cut ties. I haven't replaced that stage, though I have still done critique swaps with author friends from time to time. I mostly use beta readers now, though I do not look at them as developmental editors. They're more like product testing. I want to make sure my readers like my books (crazy, I know) as I have a more specific brand. I want to make sure they get the book I'm trying to write.

It's hard to actually extract that info from beta readers, so you have to get savvy about how you ask the questions.

I would like to use more thorough editing, but I can't justify the time when it doesn't increase sales. It's sad, because I mostly read trad pub books for this reason. They are usually better in terms of plot and character and they rarely have the language issues indie books do. So many indie books could desperately use a dev or line edit. Even those that sell very well, by very well-regarded authors. (No doubt including myself). And I am very fussy about unclear language when I read. Things happening in the wrong order in a sentence. Ugh, I can't stand it!

But, without an increase in sales, it's hard to justify waiting two weeks to get a dev edit back. Maybe if I switch up my production schedule. Sometime in the future.

Right now, after twenty-something books, I have a pretty good handle on what readers want from me. I am hesitant to bring in outside feedback, not just for the time and cost, but because I don't want any one outside voice too strong. In fact, I periodically switch up my more opinionated beta readers to avoid any one voice "polluting" my writing. I'm probably overdue for that...
 
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Michael Kingswood said:
Nothing. Developmental editing is bull*^$%. Unless the editor has personally written a bunch of successful books. But then, if he/she has, what's he/she doing editing?
There seems to be a lot of push back against this post. I don't completely agree but he make a good point.

For indies 90% of the time a developmental edit is a waste of money. Developmental edits work in trade because you're being edited by someone who knows what they're doing! They're also "free." Trade publishers are paying YOU money, and their job is the make the book as good as possible in-order to sell it so that both of you profit. Developmental editors in trade publishing also usually have a better understanding of the market. A lot of trade authors find dev edits annoying, and for good reason, but they deal with it because the publishers are giving THEM money for their book. In self-publishing we don't have to deal with that step of the editing phase, we can write the book we want how we want without someone else trying to convince us to make major changes.

For indies how do you know what the developmental editors credentials are? Most of them are hacks. You're better off getting some cheap beta reads (one's you pay for from freelance editors, or free one's from fans) and then hiring a great line editor that does a more substantial edit. There are plenty of line editors out there that do a decent job of providing some of the services you would have gotten from a more expensive dev edit.

Paying thousands of dollars for a dev edit and THEN paying hundreds more(maybe even thousands more) for further edits (because you'll still need a copyedit and proofreader afterwards) is a monumental waste of money that you could have spent on advertising.

The only time a dev edit is really worth it is if you have no idea how to write a book. Maybe your prose is fantastic but you can't come up with a plot. There are some famous writers who are absolutely fantastic wordsmiths but they struggle with plot, and then there are those who can think up an exciting rollercoaster of a story but suck at putting the words down. It's up to the writer to know their strengths and weaknesses and then make hiring choices to fill in the holes to cover up for what they lack.

Basically, if you already know how to write a book, you don't need an expensive dev edit. Just get some beta readers and the best line editor you can afford.
 

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Kwassa said:
Developmental edits work in trade because you're being edited by someone who knows what they're doing! They're also "free." Trade publishers are paying YOU money, and their job is the make the book as good as possible in-order to sell it so that both of you profit. Developmental editors in trade publishing also usually have a better understanding of the market.

This is reason enough to hire a dev editor if for no other reason, though they aren't doing it "free" in the least. And as independent authors, we are now the publisher of the book. Doesn't it behoove us as business people to make it as marketable as possible?

A lot of trade authors find dev edits annoying, and for good reason, but they deal with it because the publishers are giving THEM money for their book.

True and not true at the same time. Dev edits are annoying, but if I just wanted a pat on the back, I'd have my mom work as my editor (btw, she's had 26 trad books published, so she could probably do it). Publishers are giving the writer money, but it's just a small fraction of what the book is expected to earn. They could save money by not having a dev editor as well, but then who would buy their books?

In self-publishing we don't have to deal with that step of the editing phase, we can write the book we want how we want without someone else trying to convince us to make major changes.

You're right, we don't have to deal with that step of the editing process. Nor do we have to deal with beta's or line editors. We can just hit the publish button and move on to the next book. Of course, I can also dump rice on a plate and call it gourmet, but that won't change its taste. When eBooks first came out, that's exactly what happened. Now, there's so much competition something like that will quickly get burred in a shallow grave.

For indies how do you know what the developmental editors credentials are?

Look for reviews and recommendations. Get samples of work. If either or none are available, move on to the next candidate. You're running a business after all.

Most of them are hacks.

Good point. Some really are hacks. Others aren't. I've actually had more problems with cover artists than editors.

Paying thousands of dollars for a dev edit and THEN paying hundreds more(maybe even thousands more) for further edits (because you'll still need a copyedit and proofreader afterwards) is a monumental waste of money that you could have spent on advertising.

I agree sufficient funds should always be pumped into marketing. But ask yourself which is better, to spend 5 to make 50 or 30 to make 50? As the negative reviews pile up due to lack of editing, your marketing spend will have to increase to make up for them.

The only time a dev edit is really worth it is if you have no idea how to write a book.

I can't agree with this either (see above).

Basically, if you already know how to write a book, you don't need an expensive dev edit. Just get some beta readers and the best line editor you can afford.

You can go this way, and lots of indies do. Most of them also did this because they couldn't afford a dev edit and beta readers are a fresh pair of eyes. Get enough comments from them (and that's harder than it seems. Check around the board for examples.) and you'll have about the same thing as a dev edit, though much more piece meal. The up side of this is the beta's are reading it from a market perspective, so you don't have to worry about writing to market too much. They'll tell you what they do and don't like (if you ask them correctly, and if they respond).
To answer the OP's question, you'll look for a rate somewhere between 0.01 and 0.02 cents per word. Always look for reviews, testimonials and samples. If they refuse to give any, move on.
 
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In your reply I noticed you snipped a really important part of my post. "There are plenty of line editors out there that do a decent job of providing some of the services you would have gotten from a more expensive dev edit."

Rob Martin said:
To answer the OP's question, you'll look for a rate somewhere between 0.01 and 0.02 cents per word. Always look for reviews, testimonials and samples. If they refuse to give any, move on.
0.01 and 0.02 a word are below the typical rates for a true developmental edit. I've seen rates like that before but those are usually line editors like what I described earlier. What developmental editors have you yourself used?
 

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Kwassa said:
In your reply I noticed you snipped a really important part of my post. "There are plenty of line editors out there that do a decent job of providing some of the services you would have gotten from a more expensive dev edit."

I hadn't thought it was necessary since the discussion was about dev editors, however I agree there are more than a few very outstanding line editors that provide some of the same services as dev editors. There's even some on this board that provide All the services of a dev editor. That being said, isn't it wiser to hire people who specialize in work? My bookkeeper is an able woman, but she's not my accountant. My house painter is great at corners, but should I ask him to paint the Mona Lisa? They both may be able to do the jobs, but until I see a sample of the work, I'll go with someone else.

0.01 and 0.02 a word are below the typical rates for a true developmental edit. I've seen rates like that before but those are usually line editors like what I described earlier. What developmental editors have you yourself used?

I've worked with both trad and indie dev editors, so you'll have to be more specific. Two of my current works are out with editors now. I say two because Cynthia, my current dev editor, is retiring after Christmas, so I'm trying someone she's suggested. We'll see how it goes. As for the price being below the typical rate, it's the range always quoted to me based on my sample work submitted. If you've had different quotes, please share.
 
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