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Just curious what other people think about this?

Here's my take on me. On Monday/Wednesday/Friday I think I'm one of the best writers ever. On Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday I think that I'm a huge joke and everybody thinks I'm crazy to put out such insane and worthless drivel. Then on Sundays, I just ignore both of those extremes and write.

Anybody else experience anything close to this?
 

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I guarantee you are in the company of many on this board with that sentiment, myself included. Anymore, I just write. For now, I'm more than happy to get lost in my own mind. Life has enough worries without me putting pressure on myself to sell a million books in a month. I started writing because I loved it, and that doesn't change no matter the number of sales I get in a day.

Don't know if that helped you any, but rest assured that you're not alone.

Good luck and take care,
J.M.
 

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On a more serious note, writer's must maintain a delicate balance.

We need to have humongous self-belief to begin writing and carry it through to the end of a story, and then publish it in the expectation that someone will pay money and take time to read what we have written down.

On the other hand, we must be ultra-self-critical of our work so that we are able to edit to the point where it's shorn of all the flap, and the remaining words sparkle.

It's near-impossible to exclusively compartmentalize these dispositions, and it's no wonder writers flip out from time to time.
 

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dgaughran said:
It's near-impossible to exclusively compartmentalize these dispositions, and it's no wonder writers flip out from time to time.
I just wish I could flip out through my characters instead of getting blocked. All that drama would be good on the page.

As for ego, given how much self-promotion is required to make it in this biz, I think the bigger your ego the better. I only wish mine was big on M/W/F instead of, say, whenever there's a fifth Tuesday in the month.
 

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Gretchen Galway said:
I just wish I could flip out through my characters instead of getting blocked. All that drama would be good on the page.

As for ego, given how much self-promotion is required to make it in this biz, I think the bigger your ego the better. I only wish mine was big on M/W/F instead of, say, whenever there's a fifth Tuesday in the month.
Aint that the truth.

If only I could make my characters as exciting as ME!

(joke)
 

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I find that the writing I do when I feel like I suck is no worse than the writing I do when I feel like I rock.

Or maybe that should be: I find that the writing I do when I feel like I rock is no better than the writing I do when I feel like I suck.

Uh oh....that niggling voice named self-doubt is talking again.

;)


Angelina
 

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J.M. Pierce said:
I guarantee you are in the company of many on this board with that sentiment, myself included. Anymore, I just write. For now, I'm more than happy to get lost in my own mind. Life has enough worries without me putting pressure on myself to sell a million books in a month. I started writing because I loved it, and that doesn't change no matter the number of sales I get in a day.

Don't know if that helped you any, but rest assured that you're not alone.

Good luck and take care,
J.M.
I really think this is the concept that fuels this entire forum setup.
 

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dgaughran said:
On a more serious note, writer's must maintain a delicate balance.

We need to have humongous self-belief to begin writing and carry it through to the end of a story, and then publish it in the expectation that someone will pay money and take time to read what we have written down.

On the other hand, we must be ultra-self-critical of our work so that we are able to edit to the point where it's shorn of all the flap, and the remaining words sparkle.

It's near-impossible to exclusively compartmentalize these dispositions, and it's no wonder writers flip out from time to time.
I just had an "AH HA" moment reading this :).

I've always wondered why we writers all seemed to share this particular brand of crazy, but the way you broke it down makes complete sense.

I always love my ideas when I'm writing my first draft, then when I'm editing? I'm a haaaaack! :'(

It all makes so much sense now....
 

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There's an interesting phenomenon called the Dunning-Kruger Effect, which in essence claims that the bigger your ego, the less competent you're likely to be. So if you've got a big ego, you'll probably do well with self-promotion. Unfortunately, it's likely your books are pretty bad :)

For myself, I always go through a phase near the end of the writing process where I can't believe how terrible whatever it is I've written is, how nobody will like it and I've wasted my time writing it. It always passes in a few days, so I just tough it out until it fades.
 

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Is it just me, or does anyone else feel that they don't fit in? I wrote The Power of Persuasion out of obsession, not love of writing. I don't even know why or what I was so obsessed about at the time. It had to be an obsession though because I even took driving lessons and passed my driving test so that I could drive into Glasgow to do research in the Mitchell Library so that I could write the book. Once I'd collected all the information I needed, I wrote two thousand words every day until the book was finished.

I submitted it to the top London publishing houses full of grammatical mistakes and typos. They wrote back and said how much they enjoyed reading it but rejected it all the same. Where did I get the nerve to do such a thing? The mind boggles. It took ten years for the book to appear in print (after a year spent editing a book that took six weeks to write!), and I still wonder why I persisted with it. It's a great read and I still enjoy reading it, but it's literary fiction and will never make any real money. It's not as though I stopped after writing that first novel; I've published nine books (including anthologies written by more than one author), and I'm still plugging the books. Goodness knows why. If I ever work it out, I'll let you know.
 

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Ego is a tricky word. A lot of people take it a lot of different ways.
I am very confident in my abilities. But I think most people would say I'm "kind of quiet" outwardly.
I think it is important to be confident, and that being confident helps the writing process.
But I think it's equally important to be nice, and humble, and personable when relating to others.

In other words, no matter how large my ego is--or becomes--other people should just see part of it.

I do have moments where my confidence falters. Everyone does.


Mike
 
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