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I was researching for a nonfiction book I wanted to write and ended up getting so excited by the news and enthusiasm on this board that I decided to do self publish my novel, as well!
 

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I've been writing for over 15 years and for the first 10 of those I wanted to be a professional screenwriter, went to film school and everything. I got two measly options, spoke to some Oscar-winning producers on the phone, came close to a sale once. A script of mine was even plagiarized by an unscrupulous two-bit TV actor who produced his own made-for-cable movie.

So after a while you can tell I was fed up with the whole business. This is compounded by the fact that your success in Hollywood is heavily influenced by your networking skills, something I never had.

I transitioned to writing novels, slowly at first. I would still write screenplays once in a while to change things up. The format is so different that the change of pace did me good.

Years later, having grown in talent and experience, I wanted to get my writing published. So I did the query tango, writing to publishers, then to literary agents. I've gotten good reviews on my work so I knew I wasn't being rejected because of lack of talent. I'm just a terrible salesman. Calling up people and going all Glenngary Glen Ross on them IS JUST NOT ME!

And this is how I came to self-publish. It allowed me to bypass the system, to stop depending on others. I don't have to come begging to the Big 6 monopoly asking "Please, would you allow me to eat your crumbs and sweep your floors?" It also helps that the stigma associated with self-publishing is slowly vanishing thanks to the Lockes and Konraths of this world.

Now I just have to put out a good product, let readers know about it, and hope they spread the good word...
 

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Had enough of the rejection letters.  So glad I took the Indie route. Haven't gotten rich, but I am hundreds of dollars richer than I was months ago. :)
 

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Patrick Skelton said:
Had enough of the rejection letters. So glad I took the Indie route. Haven't gotten rich, but am hundreds of dollars richer than I was months ago. :)
Same here, Patrick. I got fed up waiting on being accepted. Furthermore, the plot of my debut novel surrounded some current themes, which were evolving rapidly. The longer I waited on the gatekeepers, the more I'd have to rewrite my story to keep it as modernized as possible. So I went Indie, and after what I read on JA Konrath's blog, I'm glad that I did.
 

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I made the decision the moment I realized it was an option.  I've always been a fan of streamlining and cutting out the middle man and that combined with being a control freak and a fan of immediate gratification made self-publishing such an exciting option! I'm just mildly regretful it took me so long to find this world.
 

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It was very easy once I realized the option was there.

I had actually stopped submitting my fiction for publication years ago. I'd been doing the usual go round, slowly getting to the point where editors would send hand-written rejections with some encouragement. Took forever as I'm sure you are all aware. Then a pro market took one of my stories and wanted to hold it because they were sure they could use it soon. Never formally accepted it, and we went back and forth. The editor was very encouraging but after holding it a year she sent it back in the end, saying they never found the right spot for it. I was very unhappy as you can imagine, but being a good little writer I sent the mss. off to the next market on my list, a semi-pro market. That editor sent it back with a nice note, saying she liked the story but it wasn't right for their magazine, and really it would be perfect for (the market that had held it for a year) so I should try them instead.

I never made another fiction submission after that, though I wrote nonfiction for magazines for a couple years. But the whole fiction submission process angered me too much to deal with. I kept writing fiction on and off, and eventually realized that the self-publishing revolution was underway. I was slow to realize the implications of ebooks and Amazon, but I jumped for joy when I realize I could reach out to readers directly and not have to mess with the gatekeepers.
 

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Three years ago I was on authonomy - my book rated well enough and there had been some publisher interest.

Other people had started to question the trade publishing industry as it stood.

Dan Holloway and Ray Rahmey were self-publishing, Diiarts had just formed, there was this awful thing called '#query-fail' and my friend Mary had just published her blog 'The Militant Writer' questioning the role of agents. I was blogging about all this - when this guy named 'Joe Konrath' published his sales numbers for the first time.

What they were doing made sense, and Joe was making money.

I wanted to try it. I had a finished manuscript in hand. All it needed was some copy editing.

When Amazon announced 70% royalties - I knew big changes where going to happen FAST. I took the plunge.
8)
 

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“How did you make your decision to publish on your own?”

I see that I 'twisted' the question a little.  I responded before that first cup of coffee, seeing, "Did you make your decision..." or "Why did you make your..." 

I didn’t make the decision on my own.  I had a lot of help. Let’s see.  Agents that disappear after they’ve made their initial fee, agents that favor other writers in their stable and give you short shrift.  Legions of ignorant Publishing House readers, interns and junior editors that are so focused on the latest publishing trends and their own juvenile taste, that they are incapable of seeing the value of your work.  More aloof and dismissive agents and publishing house editors that take forever to get back to you, if they get back to you at all. Publishing Houses that treat your book, your heart-felt ‘triumph,’ and others’ work, like so much spaghetti thrown at the ceiling, waiting to see what ‘will stick.’ I say, a pox on all their houses.  Oh, wait… there already is.

Anyway, that's my story and I'm sticking to it!
 

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IndiaLeeBooks said:
I made the decision the moment I realized it was an option. I've always been a fan of streamlining and cutting out the middle man and that combined with being a control freak and a fan of immediate gratification made self-publishing such an exciting option!
India gave my answer!

I never considered or tried traditional publishing. I had no interest in that in my life, and I actually don't really know how people do it. I never looked into it.

A friend of mine from message boards told me,"You should write a book and self-publish it. I'll buy it!" He begged me to do it for years. I researched what it was all about until I figured out the way I wanted to do it. Then I wrote a book. Once I knew about self-publishing, I did it. I wrote my book to self-publish it. The decision was easy. It's the only way I'm interested in being published.

I've been very happy with the entire process.
 

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I have, off and on, written books just for me which I knew were not publishable in terms of content or genre or concept. I had always planned on self-publishing those when I was rich and famous, and had some resources.

I also knew that my genre, the cozy mystery, has gone from a steady "bread and butter" source of income for publishers, to nothing more than cannon fodder for chain booksellers. But it was the only game in town, and it never occurred to me to self-publish.

When I read Joe Konrath's blog for the first time (and actually a few others -- I think I first heard about Kindle publishing from John August) I immediately thought of those books I intended to self-publish anyway.

As I said in my blog, it was like Joe Konrath had said "Duck, meet water." I have always enjoyed publishing -- layout, editing, marketing, accounting -- and so I was just having too much fun to stop. And given the poor returns on commercial publishing for cozy mysteries, it didn't seem like I was giving up much. (And if you don't believe that, just check out this frank and honest post by a 15 book mystery writer with a healthy career.)

Camille
 

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Really interesting stories, everyone. I decided to open my own small press after I spent a year getting lovely rejections from agents saying they liked my writing, but couldn't sell it in today's market. First, I was just doing POD because I'd previously sold 2 novellas to e-publishers Freya's Bower & Liquid Silver, and my sales were dismal. But then so were my paperback sales when I finally self-pubbed, despite multiple 4 star reviews. I only just got on board with Kindle & Nook, and while sales are still slow, they're infinitely better than what they were before. I'm learning as I go these days, so I've yet to completely give up on traditional publishing. we'll see what happens in the next few months. I'm in the middle of my 2nd novel and I haven't decided yet if I'll self-pub it straight away or submit it to agents.
 

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For me it was the issue of control.  I have complete control over what is published and I like it that way.  :)
 

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I had a near-death-experience in 2006--dead for nearly a minute and it took me years to recover both physically and emotionally. In that time I started writing fiction after 30 years of making a living in nonfiction. I went indie because I wasn't sure if I had the time to wait for an agent, wait for a deal, wait for the book to hit the shelf; I worried I would die with my work unread. So I put it out myself.
 

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Out of necessity, really. I don't have to funds to go any other route.

Well, that and my friends all got Kindles and I became completely enamored with them. I looked into the device and stumbled into the self-publishing market and places like the Kindle Boards and, for the first time ever, felt like writing a book and getting it out there where people would be able to enjoy it was totally in my reach.
 
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