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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The German  version of m winter romance, Fresh Powder, is going free for three days starting tomorrow. But I don't know where to mention it, as the normal sites wouldn't work for a free book in German.

So are there any German sites for free books?
 

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Janet Michelson said:
Is there a preferred dialect for publishing in German? I've heard there are many, many dialects in Germany.
High German (also called written German). That's used in Germany, Switzerland and Austria. You can then decide if you want the new or old spelling but it would be advisable to go with the new spelling as that's the one kids learn at school these days. Some publishers use a weird mix of both but that usually something only translators and editors have to deal with.

Dialects are regional things and should only be used in dialogues and even that can be tricky (aka consult a local and diaclects can differ from town to town). Or in very specialised local writings (there's for exmaple poetry in Swabian which even most Germans outside of Swabia would have trouble understanding or something like fun editions of 'Asteri & Obelix'). It's always better to just stick to written German and maybe mention that character X speaks with this and that diaclect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Mine is in high German. Seems to go down well. I just got an excellent review. 3*, which is great because the Germans are very sparing with praise. The review itself is detailed and excellent with the reader saying she wants to read all my work.

Happy dance!  ;D
 

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As Lyonesse said, pretty much everything written is in high German with some lexical variations between Austria, Switzerland and different parts of Germany. Some regional niche literature is written in dialect, e.g. there is a niche for fiction (and sometimes non-fiction) written in Lower German (which is actually a separate language rather than a dialect) in North Germany. But since you want to appeal to as wide an audience as possible, high German is the way to go, since that's the "standard" everybody learns in school.

Another exception is that for books set in Germany (or Austria or Switzerland), it's okay to sparingly use the respective regional dialect in dialogues and scenes from the POV of a German character. However, that won't apply to 99 percent of translated fiction.

The whole "new versus old spelling" debate is annoying, but it's not that big a deal and the old spelling continues to be used and acceptable. For a children's book, I'd go with new spelling, simply because that's what they learn at school.
 
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