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My apologies if this is the wrong forum for this to be in, but I just didn't know where to put it.
My question is this. My character fell from a muddy cliff that is several feet high. How would I phrase this in a fiction book:
1. She gazed at the wall of mud from where she’d fallen.
2. She gazed at the wall of mud she fell from.
I read I shouldn't end a sentence with a preposition, but recently discovered it's all right to do that. Any help would be appreciate.
 

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I'd suggest you rewrite the sentence in the order it happened. First she fell, then she gazed at the wall. She can't gaze at the wall until after fell. Not sure of the context in your story, but you might use two short active sentences instead.

The mud wall collapsed beneath her feet. She landed flat on her back, staring up at the wall.

Active sentences generally give the readers a more visual scene.
 

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Yeah, the thing about not ending sentences with prepositions is a late addition to English "rules." I think it often functions as an over-correction, and when it feels that way to me in a particular sentence, then I leave the proposition at the end. (Same with the rule about not splitting infinitives.) With your sentences, I think I'd probably opt for the past-perfect verb from the first and the preposition position from the second: She gazed at the wall of mud she’d fallen from.
 
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I think Boxer44 has given you the right advice. It flows much better.
Also, I'd consider using more dramatic language. "She edged carefully along the top of the slippery embankment. Without warning, her precarious foothold gave way and she was falling, her arms flailing, until she landed with a sickening thud at the bottom. Staring up at the wall ... "
 
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