Kindle Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't find the thread about the $3.99 pricing experiment, so I've started this thread--just want to let people know the story.

I decided to try pricing my historical suspense novel, Vestal Virgin at $3.99. The book has been selling well, but historical is a niche market, and therefore, limited.

As soon as I changed the price, Amazon discounted it 25%, back to $2.99--and they let buyers know they'll save a dollar.

There was some debate about what the author would be paid if Amazon discounts a book. Great news! Amazon is paying me on the list price of $3.99. This is wonderful!!! For me and my readers. Thank you Amazon! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,732 Posts
Thanks for that. They discounted Lunch Break Thrillers in Germany, but not on .com and I was wondering how it worked. Not that it helped sales, but my other none discounted books are selling ok in Germany
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
849 Posts
Amazon is patting me based on the discounted price. In the report they show the "list price" which is the full price. But they also show the "offer price" which is the discounted price and that's what they are paying me.
 
G

·
Gina Black said:
Amazon is patting me based on the discounted price. In the report they show the "list price" which is the full price. But they also show the "offer price" which is the discounted price and that's what they are paying me.
Yeah, this is what I'm seeing too. If my book had a list price of 9.99 and a sale price of 2.99, Amazon would be paying me more than double what the book was bought for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,968 Posts
I could be wrong, but I think it depends on why they lower the price. If it's a price-match, you get paid on the lower amount. If Amazon is doing a promotion on their own volition, then they pay you the list price.
Again, I may be wrong, but I think this is how it works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
I think you'll find they pay on the discounted price.  They lowered the price of one of my books and the statement shows they pay on that amount.  What they do, however, is if they drop the price, and if the price falls into the 35% territory, they *will* still pay the 70% royalty. I think that's where the confusion lies. *s*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,565 Posts
One thing that makes it hard to tell -- when they report those weekly sales spreadsheets (and even the monthly ones) they lump the sales at different prices together and report the AVERAGE return of the two.  But they list the price as just what the recent price is.

So if you sold some at the discount 2.99, and some at 3.99, the reported return would be as if you priced at 3.50.  But if you sold no books or only a few books at 2.99, and a lot at 3.99, the reported return could come out as if they paid you at 3.99.

I didn't even notice they were doing this until I had some books offered for free.  There were a few sales for full price and lots of sales for free -- and the spreadsheet showed me making a tiny fraction of a penny per book.

But as MJA says, it's possible that they have different payment policies for different classes of discount too.

Camille
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,507 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Laura Lond said:
Great news Suzanne!

Do you have Vestal Virgin selling cheaper anywhere else? B&N? Smashwords?
No. I raised the price to $3.99 across the board. I made the change last Sunday, I believe, so a few books sold at the 2.99 price. When I look at last week's sales it shows: 7 books at 35% $3.85 = 9.45
83 books at 70% $3.93 = $166...oh, wait. You're right. If they were paying me the full amount it would be $228.00

Oh well. :-\
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top