Kindle Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As per a fellow member's request I am posting my impressions.

I have been pursuing a long term de-clutter project and was motivated to purchase this book to obtain alternative advice on organizing and de-cluttering. I have previously read Julie Morgenstern's Organizing from the Inside Out and Lorrie Marrero's The Clutter Diet: The Skinny on Organizing Your Home and Taking Control of Your Life. After seeing Peter Walsh on Oprah I decided to purchase It's All Too Much: An Easy Plan for Living a Richer Life with Less Stuff.

My first impression is that the book has a strong conversational style which appealed to me greatly. Imagine that Walsh is speaking with you in person and giving you first hand advice. The primary aspect of the book that I came away with was an alternative way of viewing one's possessions that empowers one to make the hard decisions necessary to purge the "junk" that one acquires over the years. One passage in particular stood out for me.

"In the eighteenth century, an English architect named William Morris wrote that you should not have anything in your home that is not beautiful or functional."

This is a very lofty goal that I struggle to achieve.

The book is broken up into two sections.

1. The Clutter Problem - In this section, how clutter occurs is discussed along with popular excuses (and rebuttals) as to why individuals cannot get a handle on their clutter problems.

2. Putting Clutter in its Place - First, surface clutter is tackled followed by discussions on the areas of your home - Master Bedroom, Kid's room, Family and Living Rooms, Home Office, Kitchen, Dining Room, Bathroom, Garage, Basement - with the focus being on the contents and desired functions of each of these living spaces. Maintaining your hard won gains is discussed, along with habits that will assist in maintaining order.

Some of Walsh's advice is a little too draconian for me personally. For instance, with regards to the Master Bedroom, Walsh advices one to restrict the contents to furniture and clothes. For myself, this is imminently impractical. I'm still working on organizing my bedroom, but I doubt that I will remove my books - not likely.

This book does not tell you how to re-arrange all of your stuff into neater piles, or how to hide it in a storage shed / garage. If you absolutely, positively cannot let go of anything then this book will not help you. But, if you are open to re-evaluating your possessions and the impact that they have upon your life then by all means read this book.

That is the strength of It's All Too Much, the mindset that it fosters that enables change to occur. Other books may provide more organizational (post de-clutter) tips for making your household more efficient, but Walsh's book is a great first step for providing a foundation upon which one may build a more ordered, less stressful household environment.



- Walter...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,141 Posts
I read this book PK (pre-Kindle), and I also liked it very much.  I kind of liked that he took a more philosophical approach, asking me why I feel the need to hang on to all of this stuff and getting me to admit that most of it I won't ever look at again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I read this book preK also.  I thought it was very motivating.  I got a lot accomplished (declutter wise) while I was reading it.

I really should go back and reread it.  If only I could find it amongst my piles of books.  ;D

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,457 Posts
cincinnatideb said:
I read this book preK also. I thought it was very motivating. I got a lot accomplished (declutter wise) while I was reading it.

I really should go back and reread it. If only I could find it amongst my piles of books. ;D
I can't tell you how many organization/decluttering books I have. Probably can't find half of them either!

This one DOES sound interesting, especially if it might be a philosophy that would actually STICK in my head, but I think I'm better off either grabbing it from the library or reviewing it a bit more in depth at a bookstore before I'll get it in Kindle form. Last thing on earth I need is another book of this kind that I ignore--it would clutter up my K2. LOL
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top