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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My husband and I usually hook up my iPad or his smartphone to the car radio on long trips. Short battery life and very inconvenient when he gets a phone call during a good part of the book.

This time we downloaded two audio books (Smokin Seventeen by Janet Evanovich and American Gods by Neil Gaiman). It worked perfectly, and we barely used any battery life at all. On the way home we're going to try an ebook and have Kindle "read" it to us. Not sure we'll like the digital voice reader, but we're going to give it a try. Not sure which book we'll try it on. We may try a few to get used to the voice.

Anyone else know how well the digital reading voice works in the car? Any tips or tricks?
 

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I can't answer your direct question, but I will pass on a suggestion from a couple I know that both have e-readers.

When on car trips or other traveling (such as cruises) they read out loud to each other.  Both are brilliant and avid readers.  Yet they truly enjoy the slower pace and connection when reading to each other.
 

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Just remember that Audible.com has a lot of special offers. (I got two audiobooks for free when I signed up -- and a lot of other audiobooks are available at a steep discount. And of course, you can also have your Kindle read nearly anything to you using its text-to-speech option!

But you might also want to check out LibriVox.Org.  It's a site offering free audiobooks -- thousands of them -- read by volunteers from around the world. It's a special feeling knowing that you're hearing a book read by another reader who just really loved the book!
 

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Do any of you read in the car, rather than use audio? If so, do you find it gives you car sickness the way reading a paper book would?
 

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I've actually found that I CAN read on Kindle for quite some time in a car, whereas 2 minutes with a paper book would have me feeling nauseous and/or head-achy. 

With a paper book, the paper is NOT rigid so there are tiny differences in how far different points on the page move with the car's vibration.  And THAT's what causes the problems.  My theory is that since the Kindle screen is rigid, all the words move together -- greatly reducing car sickness. :D
 

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Good point, Ann. I never even tried reading my Kindle in the car yet because reading regular books makes me seasick. I'll have to do some test drives before our 15-hour trek to Northern California!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
mooshie78 said:
I get car sick reading on it just like a paperbook personally. Doesn't bother me on a plane or train (neither do paperback).
I used to be able to read in the car...until I needed granny glasses. Now the glasses jiggle just enough to make me motion sick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ann in Arlington said:
I've actually found that I CAN read on Kindle for quite some time in a car, whereas 2 minutes with a paper book would have me feeling nauseous and/or head-achy.

With a paper book, the paper is NOT rigid so there are tiny differences in how far different points on the page move with the car's vibration. And THAT's what causes the problems. My theory is that since the Kindle screen is rigid, all the words move together -- greatly reducing car sickness. :D
Do you make the font bigger, or use your regular size? I think this could work for me, if I make the type bigger and didn't need the glasses. Hmmm. I'll have to try it on the trip home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Me and My Kindle said:
Just remember that Audible.com has a lot of special offers. (I got two audiobooks for free when I signed up -- and a lot of other audiobooks are available at a steep discount. And of course, you can also have your Kindle read nearly anything to you using its text-to-speech option!

But you might also want to check out LibriVox.Org. It's a site offering free audiobooks -- thousands of them -- read by volunteers from around the world. It's a special feeling knowing that you're hearing a book read by another reader who just really loved the book!
Oh no. LibriVox. DH is going to be in audiobook heaven. Thanks for this tip.
 

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Very interesting.  I still have yet to use the voice portion of the Kindle. It feels wrong to me...but it's good to know I can try using it for this purpose.
 

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That's a great point about reading a Kindle possibly not making you carsick. I always have that problem. I have to check it out. :D
 

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I love having some audio books on there and listening to them while everyone else sleeps.  Reading is also good.  It's easier on the eyes than I would have expected.
 

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I haven't tried reading in the car, because I am always the one to drive. But when I run on the treadmill, I set the font size to higher than I normally would, I would think this would be effective when reading in the car. Jitters from the car vibration would be less noticable with a larger font size.

The text to speech feature does take some getting used to. I've been using it for a while, and have grown to like it. I use the female voice in the car. For some reason, I find the male voice carries works better at my desk, perhaps it just cuts through the ambient noise better, or the cheap earbuds I have handle the lower tone of the male voice better.

I usually use the normal speed, sometimes the slower speed. The high speed I use as sort of "speed reading", when I don't really like the book, and just want to get through it.
 

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Ann in Arlington said:
I've actually found that I CAN read on Kindle for quite some time in a car, whereas 2 minutes with a paper book would have me feeling nauseous and/or head-achy.

With a paper book, the paper is NOT rigid so there are tiny differences in how far different points on the page move with the car's vibration. And THAT's what causes the problems. My theory is that since the Kindle screen is rigid, all the words move together -- greatly reducing car sickness. :D
I agree..I have found that I can read on my Kindle in the car/on the bus with no problems but I get very sick if I try that with a DTB.
 
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