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thesios said:
How long are they taking to approve or reject submissions ?

Just one Kiss was submitted like 10 days ago !

not sure if it is a good thing or not
They ask for a 45 day exclusivity while considering your book so since the campaign is 30 days of that it gives them 15 +/- to decide on accepting both before and after campaign. You could always email too. Good luck!
 

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Cindy Rinaman Marsch said:
So it took a little while, but here is my blog post for ALLi, the Alliance of Independent Authors. If you're thinking of joining, and I highly recommend it, please use my graphic at www.rosettebook.com so I get a little referral credit. ;)

How to Run a Kindle Scout Campaign - And Why

Cindy Rinaman Marsch
Great article, Cindy. I've tweeted it and G+ it and I'll make sure to mention it in my blog tomorrow.
:)
 

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Steve Vernon said:
Great article, Cindy. I've tweeted it and G+ it and I'll make sure to mention it in my blog tomorrow.
:)
Thanks, Steve! I wish I could fix those typos they put in there! ;-)
 

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First of all, congratulations to B. B. Griffith for Sleepwalkers!

Second, as I've mentioned earlier, I've been posting information about my Modern Surprises campaign everywhere on social media that I can, and others are sharing the posts.

This afternoon, someone posted this comment: "I want to paypal you money and get the whole thing right now!!"

Even if Kindle Scout doesn't take the novel, comments such as this one really make me feel that my writing efforts are worthwhile (and I know that I have at least one person eagerly awaiting the novel's release).

Joan

 

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editorjmv said:
This afternoon, someone posted this comment: "I want to paypal you money and get the whole thing right now!!"

Even if Kindle Scout doesn't take the novel, comments such as this one really make me feel that my writing efforts are worthwhile (and I know that I have at least one person eagerly awaiting the novel's release).

Joan
That's awesome, Joan! Those little encouragements really mean a lot!
 

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Thanks everybody! In the spirit of this great thread, here are my stats.





As you can see, they were pretty good, but not outstanding by any means. My split was 68% external, 32% internal. There were fifteen days when I logged zero hours in H&T. I had two five day blocks where basically nobody saw my book. Here are my thoughts now that I'm on the other side of the campaign.

1.) Don't sweat H&T and page views.
I think it's good to hit at least 1000 page views. I don't know why that is, but I think it's a good number to shoot for, it rolls over the counter to the "K"s. Don't worry too much about hitting 2,000. I also think you should spend some time on H&T outside of the beginning and end of the campaign, but don't worry about maintaining it constantly. I think KS likes to see that you can run a publicity campaign. I think that how powerful that campaign actually is, whether it reaches 100 people or 500 people, is of less concern to them. Unless you can reach 5000 people. In which case I'm not sure you'd be doing this.

2.) Space out your promo bullets.
I had three bullets in my promo gun. The first was my facebook author page. I sent out a sponsored post to everyone who likes my page (about 350 people). I spent ten bucks to promote it. That was on the 30th and 31st. It bumped me a little, but not a lot. The second bullet was my mailing list. I have about 700 people on that list that I've gathered over three years. Nothing crazy, but a good shot. I sent it out on the 6th of February and that kept me H&T for four days or so. Then I fell off again. The last bullet was a promo on my other books. I ran a big promo on some books in my backlist and it pulled people to my website, which had a prominent "VOTE FOR ME" up top. That was on the 20th and got me through the end of the campaign.

3.) Approach the campaign with the attitude that if KS says no, you could turn around the next day and publish your novel on KDP.

I had a cover artist create my cover, and I had a content editor and two copy editors go over my manuscript. I did everything I normally do to self-publish my books. Only instead of hitting "publish" I submitted it to Scout. Even though they say they'll edit, I think it's important to give a completely polished copy to them.

4.) Backlist and sales history help a lot.

I don't sell a ton of books just yet, but I do sell some, and I sell consistently. The Sleepwalkers is my seventh book, and my others have reviews that the Kindle Scout people can look at to see if I know what I'm doing or not. I recognize that this isn't possible for everyone, and that's frustrating for a lot of people because I think that whether they meant to or not, the initial impression I got from the Kindle Scout program was that it was primarily for first time writers trying to break through, but now it's getting manuscripts from all over the place, newbies all the way to NYT Bestsellers.

That said, you can definitely get chosen if you don't have a backlist, but what you need to do is look like you are going to build a backlist. If you don't have the sales, look like you're going to make sales. Put together an online presence. This might entail putting together a simple website, or at least a facebook author page. A twitter account doesn't hurt, either. KS is looking for great books, yes, but they're also looking for authors that they can get behind. People that won't quit. Which brings me to my last point.

5.) Don't quit.

Writing is hard, and publishing is often harder. Sometimes it seems like there are so many ways to get down about yourself and so few ways to get pumped up, but always remember that the only way you lose is if you stop. It's all in your court. This is one venue to becoming an author, and I think it's a pretty good one, but there are others as well. I suggest trying them all and seeing what sticks.
 

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BBGriffith said:
Thanks everybody! In the spirit of this great thread, here are my stats.





As you can see, they were pretty good, but not outstanding by any means. My split was 68% external, 32% internal. There were fifteen days when I logged zero hours in H&T. I had two five day blocks where basically nobody saw my book. Here are my thoughts now that I'm on the other side of the campaign.

1.) Don't sweat H&T and page views.
I think it's good to hit at least 1000 page views. I don't know why that is, but I think it's a good number to shoot for, it rolls over the counter to the "K"s. Don't worry too much about hitting 2,000. I also think you should spend some time on H&T outside of the beginning and end of the campaign, but don't worry about maintaining it constantly. I think KS likes to see that you can run a publicity campaign. I think that how powerful that campaign actually is, whether it reaches 100 people or 500 people, is of less concern to them. Unless you can reach 5000 people. In which case I'm not sure you'd be doing this.

2.) Space out your promo bullets.
I had three bullets in my promo gun. The first was my facebook author page. I sent out a sponsored post to everyone who likes my page (about 350 people). I spent ten bucks to promote it. That was on the 30th and 31st. It bumped me a little, but not a lot. The second bullet was my mailing list. I have about 700 people on that list that I've gathered over three years. Nothing crazy, but a good shot. I sent it out on the 6th of February and that kept me H&T for four days or so. Then I fell off again. The last bullet was a promo on my other books. I ran a big promo on some books in my backlist and it pulled people to my website, which had a prominent "VOTE FOR ME" up top. That was on the 20th and got me through the end of the campaign.

3.) Approach the campaign with the attitude that if KS says no, you could turn around the next day and publish your novel on KDP.

I had a cover artist create my cover, and I had a content editor and two copy editors go over my manuscript. I did everything I normally do to self-publish my books. Only instead of hitting "publish" I submitted it to Scout. Even though they say they'll edit, I think it's important to give a completely polished copy to them.

4.) Backlist and sales history help a lot.

I don't sell a ton of books just yet, but I do sell some, and I sell consistently. The Sleepwalkers is my seventh book, and my others have reviews that the Kindle Scout people can look at to see if I know what I'm doing or not. I recognize that this isn't possible for everyone, and that's frustrating for a lot of people because I think that whether they meant to or not, the initial impression I got from the Kindle Scout program was that it was primarily for first time writers trying to break through, but now it's getting manuscripts from all over the place, newbies all the way to NYT Bestsellers.

That said, you can definitely get chosen if you don't have a backlist, but what you need to do is look like you are going to build a backlist. If you don't have the sales, look like you're going to make sales. Put together an online presence. This might entail putting together a simple website, or at least a facebook author page. A twitter account doesn't hurt, either. KS is looking for great books, yes, but they're also looking for authors that they can get behind. People that won't quit. Which brings me to my last point.

5.) Don't quit.

Writing is hard, and publishing is often harder. Sometimes it seems like there are so many ways to get down about yourself and so few ways to get pumped up, but always remember that the only way you lose is if you stop. It's all in your court. This is one venue to becoming an author, and I think it's a pretty good one, but there are others as well. I suggest trying them all and seeing what sticks.
Great entry. Well said! Good luck in Kindle Scout. Hope you sell a bunch.
:)
 

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BBGriffith said:
5.) Don't quit.

Writing is hard, and publishing is often harder. Sometimes it seems like there are so many ways to get down about yourself and so few ways to get pumped up, but always remember that the only way you lose is if you stop. It's all in your court. This is one venue to becoming an author, and I think it's a pretty good one, but there are others as well. I suggest trying them all and seeing what sticks.
Love this B.B. - There is no magic bullet to this writing thing, it's more a "try everything you possibly can" approach and then hope it all adds up to something in the end.

Except that there is no end. And that's the best part. We keep writing. We keep trying. We grow our audience and back list a day at a time. And the journey - thank God - is incredible. I've never been one for destinations anyway.

Congrats on the win!
 

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CarmenShea said:
Hey guys, if you can would you check out my Thunderclap Campaign and consider supporting it? Just trying to get the word out about my novel to as many people as I can as my own social media reach right now isn't all that great :)
I've got you covered, Carmen-Shea, AND you have got an important mysterious top-secret burn-after-reading message on Facebook concerning this matter.
:)
 

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CarmenShea said:
Hey guys, if you can would you check out my Thunderclap Campaign and consider supporting it? Just trying to get the word out about my novel to as many people as I can as my own social media reach right now isn't all that great :)
Carmen, get yourself over to this Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/309681422531552/
You'll fill up your Thunderclap there for sure :D

And congrats BB! I got my email telling me I'm getting a free copy.
 
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