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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would be interested in your experiences with the new reporting of KENP on the Amazon AMS dashboard.

I'm at a very early stage with AMS, just experimenting with keyword lists and bid amounts to get a feel for what the market produces. I've concentrated on Amazon.co.uk because the bids are lower and my books are set in Britain, which might explain the higher conversions I get in the UK store.

Is there a lag in the reporting of KENP on the advertising console? I've been getting some sales but no KENP at all - zilch.

One thing that has puzzled me is that when I bid low, the CTR is minute (c. 1 in 700). When I increase the bid amount the CTR rises. The conversion rate seems to stay about the same at 15-20%. Why would impressions related to a low-bid keyword be less likely to attract attention? An impression is an impression after all.

 

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Your clicks and impressions are rising because you're winning more of the auctions at a higher bid which means you're being seen more frequently. Ie attracting more attention

Double down on keywords that work by raising bids to capture more sales
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
鬼 said:
Your clicks and impressions are rising because you're winning more of the auctions at a higher bid which means you're being seen more frequently. Ie attracting more attention

Double down on keywords that work by raising bids to capture more sales
I've got my bidding set at a flat rate across all keywords. Initially the bid was £0.26, then I raised it to £0.31.

Now, if I get, say, 2,000 impressions per day at £0.26, then it's predictable that with the bid raised to £0.31 the impressions per day will go up. As you say, I'll be getting more exposure.

What perplexes me is that the CTR also goes up at the higher flat-rate bid (it roughly doubled). I would expect CTR to be purely a function of the inherent attractions of the book cover.

The conversion rate does not seem to be affected by the flat-rate bid (although the numbers are rather small at this stage so it's hard to be sure).
 

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I looked back at the last time I ran an ad and there was a delay between book sales and KENP reads of about a week.  Not sure if it's a delay in the system, or just how people were reading and sharing.  But yeah, for each sale there was 6-7 read throughs on KENP that popped up in about a week.  I wouldn't be surprised if there was a lag, honestly.  Most things on kdp have some kind of lag.
 

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From my personal data, I've found that there are some inaccuracies in the AMS KENP data

Is there a lag in the reporting of KENP on the advertising console? I've been getting some sales but no KENP at all - zilch.
From what I can tell, it seems that your KU pages should show up on the day that it is read--so long as it's within 14 days of the customer clicking your ad. However, things can get a little fuzzy if the customer turns their kindle off, read pages, and then turn it back on. Because AMS tracks the actual date that the pages are read, while KDP tracks the pages as they're coming in.

So you get these "fun" moments where you see data that looks like this:



Raw data:



On your other question:

One thing that has puzzled me is that when I bid low, the CTR is minute (c. 1 in 700). When I increase the bid amount the CTR rises. The conversion rate seems to stay about the same at 15-20%. Why would impressions related to a low-bid keyword be less likely to attract attention? An impression is an impression after all.
Are you saying that after you raise your bid, you're still only getting 700 impressions?
 

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MalcolmJWardlaw said:
What perplexes me is that the CTR also goes up at the higher flat-rate bid (it roughly doubled). I would expect CTR to be purely a function of the inherent attractions of the book cover.
This is not surprising. Look at Google search results. The ads are first 4 rows. You can raise the bid but win 2nd spot instead of 1st and still not get the click. At the same time 2nd spot will get more attention than 3rd spot. So more clicks.

As an advertiser the closer to the first you are the better your CTRs will be purely because some people only click the first result and nothing else. Amazon ads is a similar system so no surprise the better your bid the more clicks you get.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Q by Publishwide: Are you saying that after you raise your bid, you're still only getting 700 impressions?

No, I get typically 1,000 impressions per day on the single campaign I'm running at the moment. I was getting a CTR of about 0.15% at the lower bid level. The CTR went up to about 0.25% with the higher bid.

The CTR seems very low, but since impressions are free I'm not fussed at the moment. In contrast, during the last few days I've had a conversion rate of 40%, which I understand is quite good.

I'll set up multiple campaigns as more books are released in order to gain more impressions per day.
 

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MalcolmJWardlaw said:
Q by Publishwide: Are you saying that after you raise your bid, you're still only getting 700 impressions?

No, I get typically 1,000 impressions per day on the single campaign I'm running at the moment. I was getting a CTR of about 0.15% at the lower bid level. The CTR went up to about 0.25% with the higher bid.

The CTR seems very low, but since impressions are free I'm not fussed at the moment. In contrast, during the last few days I've had a conversion rate of 40%, which I understand is quite good.

I'll set up multiple campaigns as more books are released in order to gain more impressions per day.
I don't even look at the CTR. I look at number of impressions, number of clicks and how many clicks it takes to get an order and if overall I'm profitable. I've had ads where my CTR is crap but conversion off the charts. Conversion and profitability are the main things I care about.
 
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