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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is anyone familiar with this genre? I had no clue until this morning.

In a previous thread, Richard Jackson indicated that he was pleasantly surprised to find himself and several other KB authors ranked in the "Lad Lit" category on Amazon.UK. He was gracious enough to point out that one of my books is ranked #1 on that list. Although aware of the ranking, I never gave the genre much thought until this morning. Then, curiosity got the better of me…

A quick Google search turned up some interesting insights into the genre. Lad Lit seems to be a uniquely British term that is the male equivalent of "chick lit". Two items from my quick Google search:

"lad lit: n. A literary genre that features books written by men and focusing on young, male characters, particularly those who are selfish, insensitive, and afraid of commitment. Also: lad literature." http://www.wordspy.com/words/ladlit.asp

"Lad Lit... tell tales of masculine insecurity in relationships, problems with male identity in the 21st century, and stories which explore the state of play between men and women from an often emotionally confused confessional male perspective. Like Chick Lit, Lad Lit came from a need to explore the changing demands made on gender roles in modern society as men juggle new stresses and priorities with expectations of how they should behave in work, in love, and in life." http://www.britishcouncil.org/china-arts-literature-ladlit.htm

Upon reading the above, my first thought was, "C'mon! Really?" The only protagonist I can think of that would fit this category is a bumbling, though charming, Hugh Grant in any number of romantic comedies. Not really what I was going for... :D
 

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Steven L. Hawk said:
Is anyone familiar with this genre? I had no clue until this morning.

In a previous thread, Richard Jackson indicated that he was pleasantly surprised to find himself and several other KB authors ranked in the "Lad Lit" category on Amazon.UK. He was gracious enough to point out that one of my books is ranked #1 on that list. Although aware of the ranking, I never gave the genre much thought until this morning. Then, curiosity got the better of me…

A quick Google search turned up some interesting insights into the genre. Lad Lit seems to be a uniquely British term that is the male equivalent of "chick lit". Two items from my quick Google search:

"lad lit: n. A literary genre that features books written by men and focusing on young, male characters, particularly those who are selfish, insensitive, and afraid of commitment. Also: lad literature." http://www.wordspy.com/words/ladlit.asp

"Lad Lit... tell tales of masculine insecurity in relationships, problems with male identity in the 21st century, and stories which explore the state of play between men and women from an often emotionally confused confessional male perspective. Like Chick Lit, Lad Lit came from a need to explore the changing demands made on gender roles in modern society as men juggle new stresses and priorities with expectations of how they should behave in work, in love, and in life." http://www.britishcouncil.org/china-arts-literature-ladlit.htm

Upon reading the above, my first thought was, "C'mon! Really?" The only protagonist I can think of that would fit this category is a bumbling, though charming, Hugh Grant in any number of romantic comedies. Not really what I was going for... :D
As with "chick lit" the term likely is over-simplified in any attempts to define it, and the audience ranges farther afield than the critics recognize. It probably started with the kind of books that get made into Hugh Grant movies (and John Cusack movies in the U.S.) but has evolved quite a lot.

Camille
 

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Well, the more common name for is it dick lit. I'm guessing that won't be censored here but if so, just take the ch off of chick and add a d.

And the definition of it you provided is about as good as any I have seen, i.e.

"tell tales of masculine insecurity in relationships, problems with male identity in the 21st century, and stories which explore the state of play between men and women from an often emotionally confused confessional male perspective.  Like Chick Lit, Lad Lit came from a need to explore the changing demands made on gender roles in modern society as men juggle new stresses and priorities with expectations of how they should behave in work, in love, and in life." 

I read chick lit to get a female perspective on life. I suspect there are females who do the same with d-lit.

 

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Steven L. Hawk said:
"lad lit: n. A literary genre that features books written by men and focusing on young, male characters, particularly those who are selfish, insensitive, and afraid of commitment. Also: lad literature." http://www.wordspy.com/words/ladlit.asp

"Lad Lit... tell tales of masculine insecurity in relationships, problems with male identity in the 21st century, and stories which explore the state of play between men and women from an often emotionally confused confessional male perspective. Like Chick Lit, Lad Lit came from a need to explore the changing demands made on gender roles in modern society as men juggle new stresses and priorities with expectations of how they should behave in work, in love, and in life." http://www.britishcouncil.org/china-arts-literature-ladlit.htm
Sounds like more chick lit to me.

Could be a plot in one of those Lifetime Movie Network films.
 

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daringnovelist said:
As with "chick lit" the term likely is over-simplified in any attempts to define it, and the audience ranges farther afield than the critics recognize. It probably started with the kind of books that get made into Hugh Grant movies (and John Cusack movies in the U.S.) but has evolved quite a lot.

Camille
I think it's, like, Nick Hornby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
swolf said:
Sounds like more chick lit to me.
Yeah, I see both chick lit and lad lit as the literary equivalents of a "chick flick." Then again, Jerry Maquire might be a good example of theatrical lad lit.
 

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Huh.  I can see the genre, but... how the heck did your books get categorized that way?  ???
 

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Steven L. Hawk said:
Upon reading the above, my first thought was, "C'mon! Really?" The only protagonist I can think of that would fit this category is a bumbling, though charming, Hugh Grant in any number of romantic comedies. Not really what I was going for... :D
Actually Steven, having read that description I think that my book Happiness May Vary and the one I just finished today (Samurai Zombie Hunter) fits into that category very easily. I have to look into it more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Arkali said:
Huh. I can see the genre, but... how the heck did your books get categorized that way? ???
No idea, Anne. The only thing I can think of is someone tagged it as Lad Lit. There was also a review that deemed it "enjoyable Lad Lit", but that seems to have disappeared.

Jeff and Christian, glad to know there are some books out there that fit the genre. :)
 

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Jon Olson said:
I think it's, like, Nick Hornby.
This is how I have always thought of it too. And Nick Hornby books aren't at all shallow or superficial- he writes about real lads and what they are experiencing in terms of relationships, expectations, careers, etc. He's a lovely writer! I would be happy to be included in a genre he epitomizes:)
 
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This is about as stupid as "Mum" for mother or mom; or "arse" for ass. What is Tom Sawyer or Huckleberry Finn? Bad lad lit? hahahahah
 

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George Everyman said:
Well, the more common name for is it dick lit. I'm guessing that won't be censored here but if so, just take the ch off of chick and add a d.

And the definition of it you provided is about as good as any I have seen, i.e.

"tell tales of masculine insecurity in relationships, problems with male identity in the 21st century, and stories which explore the state of play between men and women from an often emotionally confused confessional male perspective. Like Chick Lit, Lad Lit came from a need to explore the changing demands made on gender roles in modern society as men juggle new stresses and priorities with expectations of how they should behave in work, in love, and in life."

I read chick lit to get a female perspective on life. I suspect there are females who do the same with d-lit.
You think you get a "female perspective on life" from chick lit?

Really? Hahaha! Thanks for the chuckle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Rachel Schurig said:
This is how I have always thought of it too. And Nick Hornby books aren't at all shallow or superficial- he writes about real lads and what they are experiencing in terms of relationships, expectations, careers, etc. He's a lovely writer! I would be happy to be included in a genre he epitomizes:)
Sounds like an excellent author, Rachel. To my dismay, I may never be called a lovely writer. My protagonist is a knuckle-dragging soldier who kicks butt and leaves sticky, purple pools of alien blood in his wake. :D
 

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Mmmm, can I have his phone number? ;)
Steven L. Hawk said:
Sounds like an excellent author, Rachel. To my dismay, I may never be called a lovely writer. My protagonist is a knuckle-dragging soldier who kicks butt and leaves sticky, purple pools of alien blood in his wake. :D
 

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Steven L. Hawk said:
Sounds like an excellent author, Rachel. To my dismay, I may never be called a lovely writer. My protagonist is a knuckle-dragging soldier who kicks butt and leaves sticky, purple pools of alien blood in his wake. :D
Sounds like somebody confused "lad lit" for "guy movie."

It's sort of like "chick lit" and "women's fiction" only flipped. "Chick lit" tends to be the more commercial side, and "women's fiction" is more literary and has more variety.

Camille
 
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