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Discussion Starter #1
1 I want to go with print on demand publishing and ebook companies with many different ones of both kinds.
My question is I am greatly concerned with agreeing with many agreements is there any tricks they can pull on me in the "fine print", can they take any rights away from me somehow with legal trickery, or any other undesirable possibilities with my book.(I will try to not go with exclusive programs just free to go with multiple companies ones)

2 also same as last question if i hand my book to a free editor can they steel it somehow and run with it, with the fine print of acceptance to use their free service

3 does it matter if i use serval isbn numbers for my book (the free option from many different print on demand companies) or should i have just one for all, does it make a difference for the long run
 

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1) Contracts have to do with trust. For me, fine print gets muddled. I don't sift through every contract with a fine tooth comb. Use the retailers other writers are using here on Kboards. Research and word of mouth is more important to me than contracts (I'm not a lawyer, if you can tell).

2) Find editors that you can trust. Writers do have their manuscripts stolen, but it's very rare and almost never from an unknown author. It's usually from a big author that they can profit from.

Sift through Kboards or the internet for information on editors. I use editors from the EFA. That costs money but assures I get the very best. Be very careful with free services. I wouldn't recommend a free editor (Grammarly is free too, you know).

3) I'd buy your own ISBN through Bowker--one for an ebook and one for paperback. You can do without your own ISBNs and use Amazon's, but there have been times when owning my own ISBN from Bowker has been very useful.

Hope my answers are helpful. Good luck with your books!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
on question 3 you mentioned that it at times has been very useful how has it been useful to have your own isbn
 

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ISBNs are expensive, but there are times when things don't run smoothly with retailers. Owning your own ISBN gives you more freedom. Many authors do without, but I've had a couple of times when it's been of use to me, particularly as I sell my books wide.

Best example, if you use a free ISBN but then have difficulty with a particular POD retailer, it can take time and headaches to free the book for sale elsewhere. Most problems can be sorted out, but there are stories of writers who report getting their book stuck for months with some sellers.

I suppose if you decide to only ever sell to a particular retailer, such as Amazon, using a free ISBN is an inexpensive option. But you see the problem, right? It's like insurance. You have to decide whether the cost is worth it to you.
 

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I'll expand on what I was trying to say.

If you get a free ISBN from a retailer, and, let's say, there's a problem with that retailer for book sales and you decide you want to disassociate yourself with them, you might have difficulty transferring your book for sale elsewhere. Things like reviews etc could get stuck with the ISBN provided for free by the retailer you chose.

There have been times when I do believe that having my own ISBN has been helpful with correspondence, etc, when marketing and selling my books with outside companies. Can I give exact proof. No.

How often do problems occur? Not very often. But it is a consideration regarding control if you are selling your book wide. I also copyright my books. Necessary? That's a whole other controversial topic.
 

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Another consideration on the print side is that if you use a free KDP ISBN and also use something like IngramSpark with a different ISBN for the same paperback, you'll end up with two Amazon sales pages for that same book since Amazon builds them per ISBN.

Think of the ISBN as simply a product number. The same product (paperback edition of a book) should have the same product number, no matter who actually produces it. This article may help: Why Indie Authors should use Both KDP Print and IngramSpark Together.
 

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.

If you are just starting out ... then keep your headaches low and choose the easy and cheap path for now.
Spend your mental effort on writing the next book and the next book after that. When your fan base expands and your sales climb then start working on other strategies for future books.

While some writers grip lightning in a bottle with their first book, it's a story told more often and romanticized more fully than it actually happens. You'll have time.

.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
1 i read that there is a risk with book returns if the book store doesn't want them and you have to buy them back, if you are invested in many book stores is it a real risk to get major book returns in massive quantities,

2 this being the case can you set a limit of books that are returnable at instagram/where ever else. like for example 2 books per store

3 i also read that somehow the book store would contact you giveing you the option of selling a bunch of books, and that thing i read said that be carfull of that if you think that that many will actually sell

4I also plan to have the book be very cheap(where i make either nothing or close to it) so im concerned of returns if i dont make money on it

5 if i wanted my book to be just the costs of of printing/pod fees, or whateever misc, where i dont get any money from it is it possible to set up the pod/whatever to be this way, how can i get this to be as free as possible(where i make either nothing or close to it) i dont mind if the end seller makes their own profit on it provided its their normal profit margin, how can i set it up where i dont get anything but they can make a resasonable profit(the book store/end seller)
 

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You should really start a new thread if you have a new question instead of adding to an unrelated thread.

1 i read that there is a risk with book returns if the book store doesn't want them and you have to buy them back, if you are invested in many book stores is it a real risk to get major book returns in massive quantities,
If you don't want to allow returns, then don't allow them. It's as simple as that.

2 this being the case can you set a limit of books that are returnable at instagram/where ever else. like for example 2 books per store
You can't set any limit (and it's IngramSpark, the printer - Instagram is a social media platform), but as noted above, just don't allow returns at all and it's not an issue.

3 i also read that somehow the book store would contact you giveing you the option of selling a bunch of books, and that thing i read said that be carfull of that if you think that that many will actually sell
It's more likely that you would contact local bookstores to see if they'll carry your book than for a bookstore to contact you out of the blue. If you decide to work directly with a local bookstore, you can arrange terms directly with them. Look into the concept of "consignment sales."

4I also plan to have the book be very cheap(where i make either nothing or close to it) so im concerned of returns if i dont make money on it
Again, just don't allow them. Problem solved.

5 if i wanted my book to be just the costs of of printing/pod fees, or whateever misc, where i dont get any money from it is it possible to set up the pod/whatever to be this way, how can i get this to be as free as possible(where i make either nothing or close to it) i dont mind if the end seller makes their own profit on it provided its their normal profit margin, how can i set it up where i dont get anything but they can make a resasonable profit(the book store/end seller)
Any publishing platform you use should have a calculator that will tell you how much you'd earn per sale for any given book's specs, including interior color, binding type, page count, retail list price, and wholesale discount. You can use that calculator to determine the list price you want to set for that book. But why publish a book if you don't actually want to earn anything for it? Just put it out on the internet for free.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
1you said dont allow returns as an option, but i heard if you dont allow returns then they wont stock them in the first place, so if i do allow returns because of that is there a real risk that i will get stuck with a massive bill espicially since i plan to make nothing or near to it(if i ever get lucky enouth to get to that situation were there are that many being stocked)

2you said put for free on the internet i am going to but i want to have a professional version also, and to expand into all possible possibilities to broaden the exposure of the book
is there a way to set the book where i get 0 royalties(or close to it) and all the other companies involved get what they normally get for commissions/expenses
 

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Discussion Starter #13
is there a way to set the book where i get 0 royalties(or close to it) and all the other companies involved get what they normally get for commissions/expenses
 

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In case you are new and just starting out, don't worry about agreements, exclusivity, and similar stuff. Just focus on creating quality works and getting your works out there.

And ISBNs are expensive to get. You can use the free ISBN of Amazon. Of course, getting your own ISBNs can be useful in some cases.
 

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is there a way to set the book where i get 0 royalties(or close to it) and all the other companies involved get what they normally get for commissions/expenses
Each platform has pricing calculators that will show you the compensation you'd receive at the given retail list price. Set it where you want it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
what would "marketing HEAVILY to brick & mortar stores" involve because im considering doing what the publisher does and spend allot of time and keep spending time marketing my book on the internet and maybe contact choice book stores as well, and keep doing it for years maybe
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
new questions in the following thread

 

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what would "marketing HEAVILY to brick & mortar stores" involve because im considering doing what the publisher does and spend allot of time and keep spending time marketing my book on the internet and maybe contact choice book stores as well, and keep doing it for years maybe
There's a very strong chance that brick & mortar stores won't carry your book on their shelves at all. They'll order one if someone requests it, but they usually won't stock them.
 
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