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First thought: that's even more insane than the idea of just giving people books as long as they agree to give them back.

Second thought: what are the terms? Late fees, cap on total lending, etc. Are they all public domain books?

I am very confused by this, especially bc, last I heard, publishers were very wary of ebook library lending. They were going to incorporate all sort of DRM type stuff to put a cap on how many times a copy could be lent out, to approximate the lifespan of a DTB. Or something.

Third thought: they're not really buying kindles in bulk and then just giving them to people, are they? Really? What's the replacement fee if your kid tries to flush it down the toilet?
 

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I would happily let my book go there.

I realize a library 'sale' doesn't necessarily make a lot of money ... but that's not about the $$ ... it's the marketing. It's the getting the story into the hands of a reader. If a library chose to stick Little White Lies on it, I would call that a marketing 'cost' and be happy to be there.

Happily, I tell ya. :)
 

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There is no new copy being generated in this system. The library is lending exactly what it bought. In most eBook library systems, the libraray makes a new copy for the user. They can also lend their purchase to only one patron at a time. It is very similar to paper lending except that the content will never deteriorate. The Kindle will go first, and the library will load their purchase onto a new Kindle.

I like the idea. I suspect it will introduce new folks to the Kindle and they will buy their own.
 

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I will also add that I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of those 100 books are public domain classics that the library can indeed make as many copies as they like.

I'm all for libraries lending ebooks. I'm a bit surprised about lending a Kindle too, but I don't see anything wrong with it. I've checked out books for a Nook Color before and beyond having to side load them, it's an easy process.

It does make me wonder what kind of impact libraries might have on book sales once people learn how easy it is to check out an ebook. If you could get on a waiting list for the latest Stephen King ebook and get notified by email that it's ready for you to check out, would you be patient and wait maybe two months for it or would you spend the $15 and buy it? Myself, I'd wait. There are so many other books to read I can busy myself with them.
 

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The next very viable step, as ereaders become more prevalent, is just setting up a library website where you can download ebooks directly to your device, much like how amazon operates now. I guess they'd include DRM or whatever that made the ebook pull a cinderella disappearance after a certain amount of time, but DRM is always, inevitably, hacked. So...I dunno.

I think libraries are awesome, and I also think that if the idea were pitched today, it would never, ever, ever happen. Ever. I'm not sure how the same "free" model is realistically going to work, large scale, with ebooks.

Asher MacDonald said:
I will also add that I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of those 100 books are public domain classics that the library can indeed make as many copies as they like.

I'm all for libraries lending ebooks. I'm a bit surprised about lending a Kindle too, but I don't see anything wrong with it. I've checked out books for a Nook Color before and beyond having to side load them, it's an easy process.

It does make me wonder what kind of impact libraries might have on book sales once people learn how easy it is to check out an ebook. If you could get on a waiting list for the latest Stephen King ebook and get notified by email that it's ready for you to check out, would you be patient and wait maybe two months for it or would you spend the $15 and buy it? Myself, I'd wait. There are so many other books to read I can busy myself with them.
 

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That's interesting.  It's kind of cool, but I think I like the idea of loaning out a couple books at a time for people to download onto their ereaders.  I mean, 100 books?  That's kind of crazy.  I suppose I understand though.  I'm sure they're doing it for those who have yet to buy an ereader or can't afford one.  Out of curiousity was it an affluent area or lower income?
 
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