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Glad to see this thread.

I am a keyboard snob, although I try to be gracious about it and keep quiet around other people.

There is no doubt in my mind that the quality of the keyboard has a direct relationship to the quality of the writing. That, of course, is subjective and may well be unsupportable, but it is a truth for me.

My main keyboards are an old Das Keyboard that sounds like how a war tank sounds as it thunders over the horizon. I like it loud and I am sure it would get me censored in an office, but I work alone.

I also use a modern KeyChron K3 Slim. This is one of a long line of models made primarily for gamers. There is just about nothing that you can't change on them; the keys, colours, and unfortunately, the backlighting. I say unfortunate because my keyboard has something like a dozen lighting setups, colours, and light level changes. Some settings make it seem like I am trying to write at a rock concert, and I am sure they are a danger to someone with epilepsy. Fortunately, there is an old-guy steady light setting that has an adjustable light level.

As someone else mentioned, backlighting is just so useful and comfortable that I am going to make sure that whatever keyboard, or laptop, I get next has it.

I have several portable (usually folding) bluetooth keyboards for when I am out and about with just my phone or my Apple Mini. But I was very picky about buying and keeping them. None of them are mechanical but there are big differences in touch between the jello keyboards and some are acceptable.

When I travel (before Covid-19) I use a fairly old MacBook that has a decent non-mechanical touch. I would buy a newer model in a heartbeat, but I have yet to find as good a Macbook keyboard. I also use an old Lenonvo Thinkpad for the same reason, and I have a couple of Chromebooks where the designers at least tried to pay attention to the quality of the keyboard.

Now, if someone could recreate a modern version of the ancient IBM Selectric typewriter keyboard that would be just about perfect.
 

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I still use an IBM Model M keyboard from 1990. The "original" clickey keyboard. Once a year I take it apart, clean it, and put the keycaps through the dishwasher. Best keyboard ever made. The only thing it lacks is a Windows key, but otherwise, I wouldn't trade it for the world. ClickyKeyboards
 

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A few years ago, my back got so bad that I could no longer sit at a desk. I had to get used to typing on a laptop, so I can sit in the armchair to write. It took a long time to get used to a keyboard that is practically flat and doesn't click. Now I can't use anything else, and at least my back's not suffering. Some old fashioned things are much, much better than the latest one. Have you seen the keyboard that comes with a Mac nowadays? You can scarcely find it, never mind type on it.
 

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Question: How does one connect these ancient computer keyboards to a modern USB port? Are there special apps or cords or whatever to do this?
 

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There's an adapter available for just about every situation.
Hardware adaptor, or app + hardware? I'm asking because I have a couple older PC & Mac keyboards and am curious as to whether I could use them as USB keyboards at some point, should I want to.
 
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