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There is an interesting post on the Yahoo boards about memory management and the index file. This person had 358 book on the main Kindle. They transferred everything to an SD card and had nothing in main memory. Only 105 mb out of the 256mb was available for use and they theorized that a lot of the now unavailable memory was being used by the index file. This does make sense to me, although I don't know how she got so many book into main Kindle memory.

It makes sense that their must be a main file to keep track of all the indexing. Thus, if I run through 1000 books on my Kindle, before transferring them to either my SD card or my computer, the index file should get a lot bigger. What if I run through 3000 books. Eventually all of the main Kindle memory would be taken up with this file.

Does anyone understand exactly how this indexing work. I you add a book and it gets indexed, what happens when you delete the book. I would assume that the index info would remain (to be ready for if the book returns), but perhaps it is automatically deleted when a book is deleted. Does anyone know how this works?

Steve
 
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I can picture how it would work in my head but I'm not sure if it's right and I know there are no gerbils involved so I don't know why I keep seeing them.

Anyway the way I see it, everytime anything is downladed to the Kindle, book, newspaper and so on, that file name is added to a list in the index file.

The name in the index doesn't take up much space but it still takes up some.  I can imaging this file getting quit huge as time goes on.  One thing I don't know is does the Kindle keep the name of a book on file even it it's been deleteted or transferred to a computer HD. 

Keeping deleted or transferred names would of course be a bad thing.  It would slow down the sorting process and of course take up valuable space in the Kindle.

 

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Would this be a question for Leslie - the guru of all things kindle?  Interesting question though.  Hope someone can answer it.
 

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Indexing is not just the titles of books, but all the information so that when you search for a word, it knows where the word can be found.  Titles alone would be trivial to store.  1000 titles at 30 bytes a title would be only 29K bytes, for only titles.  The word indexing, on the other hand, could be taking up room, but for all we know, there is another chip just for that, that the Kindle uses internally.
 

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Kindle has 180MB that we can use. Ive got 750 books ive transferred to my sd card (actually ive transferred everything there including magazines) and right now i show 180MB available on my kindle so wherever the indexing is stored, its not taking up our available memory. I keep everything on the sd card in case anything happens to my kindle. That way i wont lose all my free stuff which is most everything there.
 

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I let Amazon and my computer hard drive store every Kindle title that I'm not currently reading. I've never used an SD card and I've never gotten close to depleting the on-board memory.
 

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This post (thanks, jktaylor from KindleKorner) sounded like a reasonable explanation to me:
First, if you keep books on the SD card, then the Search Indexes are also kept on the SD
card. For example, In Content Manager, I have 4 pages of books in internal memory, and
27 pages stored on the SD card. The Search Index folders are 11.1 MB on Kindle and 89
MB on the SD card.

Secondly, Kindle (at least sometimes) keeps books in the index after they've been deleted.
You might notice this if you delete something and then add it back later - the new-again
book often does not have to be re-indexed (my guess is that as long as the filename and
size and/or checksum are unchanged, then Kindle recognizes the book). I don't know if
there's a time limit on how long deleted books remain in the index, or if the index is
periodically purged of deleted items on a schedule, but I do know that deleting the index
files (via USB connection) and letting Kindle rebuild* them resulted in more free space on
my Kindle. Perhaps this is simply because fresh index files are more compact than those
with a lot of usage, but mainly, I think, it was because deleted books were no longer
indexed.
 

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thanks for the idea Lizzy - gonna do that as soon as I can get myself off of the board.   :)
 

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Here's how to do it in XP.  Sorry, I don't have anything else to check against for other versions of Windows.  I'm pretty sure it was the same in Win 98 but I don't know anything about Vista.

Open Windows Explorer
Go to the Tools drop down menu at the top
click on Folder Options (the last option on mine)
Go to the second tab, named "View"
There is a folder icon at the top that says "Files and Folders", then below it and indented is another folder icon that says "Hidden Files and Folders."
Under Hidden Files and Folders should be two circles, click so that the dot is in the circle next to "Show hidden files and folders."
Go back up to the top of the window and click the button "Apply to All Folders"
You should now be able to see your hidden files.

I cheated and looked this up in Windows help and went through the whole process myself to check that it worked.  I couldn't find anything that might be an index file, but I am not terribly savvy about these things.

Katiekat

PS - I'm wondering if it is something that isn't in the main memory at all?
 
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