Kindle Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,329 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've pointed out that, for whatever reasons, people don't ask me about my K2 when out in the wild. Which is disappointing, because I want to brag on the thing.

I have an artist friend though. One who I arm-twisted into being my Eldon and painting a mural in my writing room. An incredibly detailed scene covering all 4 walls and the ceiling. Our time together is spent with her painting and me sitting on the bed in the room with my laptop and talking her ear off -- occasionally playing songs for her, or clips, or gabbing about my latest obsession. She breaks in to ask me a question about the wall and gamely listens the rest of the time. It must sort of be hell on earth, because most people consider me quiet, but once you wind me up...

Anyhow, as many of you know, I just got back home about a month ago so the work on the mural just resumed recently. I don't know what opened the door to discussing "Trixie," but I did give her the run down, the advantages, etc. Yesterday she told me she mentioned it to her son and his girlfriend, both 19ish, and they'd never heard of it. Her son said he didn't think he'd like it since he liked books so much, that it wouldn't feel right.

I told my friend, Ann, that that's what most Kindle owners thought at one point, too. I pointing at my overfull bookshelves as proof that I certainly have a regard for print books. I also pointed out how for a long time the ads for the Kindle when I went to Amazon bugged the pee out of me. I explained how I became a convert and how good it felt to always have so many selections at my fingertips.

We also started discussing something I'd read in a book and I said, let me find the passage. Picked up Trixie, searched it out, and was reading it to her in no time. :)

I think one of the issues is that we're in an area where people take pride in being in the middle of nowhere. At the end of the road. It's actually surprising that there's Sprint service here, and there are large areas of forests surrounding here where you're lucky to get a signal from any service. At all. I held my breath when we returned here until I, happily, saw that the map was right about 1x Sprint coverage. So it might not strike people as an automatic choice like it would in a big city where gadgets flourish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
The thing that always astonishes me is that so many people have never even heard of the Kindle. It was on the cover of Newsweek right before the initial launch in November, 2007, and it's been mentioned in many newspapers and magazines and various TV programs since then. Plus, for anyone who ever visits amazon.com - and who doesn't? - it's prominently displayed there.

So, how is it possible for anyone who hasn't been living in a cave for the past year and half to not know about the Kindle?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
67,245 Posts
I think there are fewer cave dwellers since the K2 release.  I did have some one ask about it last summer when I'd first gotten mine.  I said it was from Amazon.  They said "Oh, I don't use Amazon."  I admit I was briefly speechless.  :eek:

Ann
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,329 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Mycroft said:
The thing that always astonishes me is that so many people have never even heard of the Kindle. It was on the cover of Newsweek right before the initial launch in November, 2007, and it's been mentioned in many newspapers and magazines and various TV programs since then. Plus, for anyone who ever visits amazon.com - and who doesn't? - it's prominently displayed there.

So, how is it possible for anyone who hasn't been living in a cave for the past year and half to not know about the Kindle?
We live in an extraordinary time for information, but there's too much of it for any one person to take in. That means we all end up filtering out things based on our interests, preferences, and prejudices. It also means that most of us, no matter how intelligent, have pockets of ignorance which will astound others!

I think we've all looked at a friend, or had a friend look at us, astounded. "No, you're kidding right? How have you never heard about....? I thought it was common knowledge! How could anybody in this society not have heard reference to..."

I mentioned Marlo Thomas to a friend. He's only about 5 years younger than me. He'd never heard of her (that he recalled) or That Girl and he was a little unclear on Danny Thomas. I pointed out she's married to Phil Donahue and he told me, in all seriousness, that he thought PD was gay. But this is a staggeringly intelligent man and I know there have been times when he wondered how I missed some of his references.

We are clearly people who love to read and are comfortable with the internet, and that makes it astonishing for us to imagine someone not knowing about our pet gadget. But other people, while perhaps still liking to read, list it lower on their list of hobbies, content to buy a book at the local drug store or casually browse a book store while out running errands. Their relationship with the interwebz might be similarly more casual and confined to emails and the lightest of surfing. So, it then becomes possible that they might have technically seen Our Baby on the cover of a magazine, but they never focused on it, because it's not part of their world.

I have an astonishing capacity for blocking out the sound of my dogs barking -- as long as they're not in distress or where they can disturb the neighbors, as I'm sure some people do the same when their kids are being crazy people -- at least it seems that way in restaurants. Suddenly, I realize my canines have been barking for a while -- while it wasn't in my conscious mind, I'd been aware of it on some level all along. Sometimes people can be exposed to something and never have a reason for it to come to the forefront of their consciousness.

No idea where I was going with this. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,162 Posts
MichelleR, I agree that there is too much information for any one person to take in and that we filter it to a manageable level. Up until Nov. 29, 2008, I had not heard of the Kindle even though I had heard of e-ink. I am very comfortable with the Internet, but I work using a computer all day and rarely used the computer at home except for specialized searches or non-Internet activity. (Dial-up access to the Internet at home did not help!) We had discontinued satellite service a few years ago and do not receive broadcast TV. I listen to audio books on the hour-long drive to and from work instead of listening to the news. I know I have major holes in my knowledge of current cultural references. I had an Amazon account but had not looked at the Kindle ads as I don't look at most advertisements.

So when DH mentioned on Nov. 29 that he wanted to get me a Kindle for Christmas (while we were discussing which Zen model [similar to iPod] I should get for him for Christmas), he had to explain to me what the Kindle was. (A woman in Walmart overheard us and told me I was lucky because she wanted one.) I did an online investigation as soon as we got home. A few hours later my Kindle was ordered; it arrived at the end of February.

I was a prime candidate for the Kindle but due to no broadcast or satellite TV, I missed hearing about it on Oprah, etc., due to not reading ads, news magazines, or listening to radio, I missed those notifications. Instead, I learned about it from DH, a librarian who had been following Kindle news for a while and had not mentioned it to me until he was thinking of Christmas gifts.

EDIT: Not counting the audio books from the library that I listen to while I commute, I read one or two fiction books a week, regularly purchase nonfiction books for reference in a variety of subjects, and read every chance I get. When DH and I go on vacation, we bring home more books. Two requirements we had when looking for a house several years ago were a room for the library and a room for the model railroad. Both of us have hobbies are reference book intensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
Folks must remember that the mere fact that we are on a Kindle internet forum means we are the very TIPITY TIP of the spear when it comes to e-book readers. Thus things which we find important to talk about, like folders and stuff, are things most Kindle owners are totally unaware of (and wouldn't even miss) and are things non-Kindle owners are COMPLETELY ignorant about.

I'm sure Amazon has tons of marketing and usage research and I suspect it would be shocking to see what the perception of things are from their POV. Which is why I don't necessarily blame amazon for the screensaver, fonts, and folder issues (though I agree with the folks here that we should have more control over them). With time I think we will see our issues addressed, particularly if competition heats up and feature comparisions can be more easily drawn.

Reading is such a low priority for so many folks, I still amazed we are seeing tech in this arena at all. And given the demographics of most readers, I'm frankly surprised piracy is even an issue. Books are not movies, music, or games which can be consumed at a rapid pace and appeal mostly to a poor, young demographic. Most folks probably read only 1-2 books a year and they wouldn't even have a kindle in the first place. Kindle users are heavy readers and we have an appreciation for compensating the writer, our demographic is probably the LEAST likely to pirate. Could be wrong, I suppose, but I just don't see the book community as being analgous to the music and film industry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Ann in Arlington said:
I think there are fewer cave dwellers since the K2 release. I did have some one ask about it last summer when I'd first gotten mine. I said it was from Amazon. They said "Oh, I don't use Amazon." I admit I was briefly speechless. :eek:

Ann
Amazon people like that exist! I am shocked also
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,324 Posts
jason10mm said:
Folks must remember that the mere fact that we are on a Kindle internet forum means we are the very TIPITY TIP of the spear when it comes to e-book readers. Thus things which we find important to talk about, like folders and stuff, are things most Kindle owners are totally unaware of (and wouldn't even miss) and are things non-Kindle owners are COMPLETELY ignorant about.

I'm sure Amazon has tons of marketing and usage research and I suspect it would be shocking to see what the perception of things are from their POV. Which is why I don't necessarily blame amazon for the screensaver, fonts, and folder issues (though I agree with the folks here that we should have more control over them). With time I think we will see our issues addressed, particularly if competition heats up and feature comparisions can be more easily drawn.

Reading is such a low priority for so many folks, I still amazed we are seeing tech in this arena at all. And given the demographics of most readers, I'm frankly surprised piracy is even an issue. Books are not movies, music, or games which can be consumed at a rapid pace and appeal mostly to a poor, young demographic. Most folks probably read only 1-2 books a year and they wouldn't even have a kindle in the first place. Kindle users are heavy readers and we have an appreciation for compensating the writer, our demographic is probably the LEAST likely to pirate. Could be wrong, I suppose, but I just don't see the book community as being analgous to the music and film industry.
Very good points. The fact that I read 2 or 3 books a week compared to that may a year makes quite a difference. There are some on this board who read much more than that. No one I work with (over 100 people) reads. (I've asked) They spend time with on line games, video poker, movies, TV, fishing, hunting and all sorts of other persuits but no one reads. Some read the newpaper, but only as it pertains to their other interests. I am sure that there are Kindle Owners for whom it is a status symbol only. The demographics of Kindle ownership would be very interesting to see. Wonder how we could get Amazon to let us see? ;)
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top