Kindle Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, as I'm struggling to actually finish something (and more motivated than ever to do it), I have been reflecting on my writing process and discovered it is roughly something like this:

1) Procrastinate
2) Write a couple lines
3) Procrastinate some more
4) Trash what I already wrote and start over
5) Decide I need to work on my outline some more
6) Write a little bit more
7) Repeat 1-6 for a while
8) Finally write something that I feel good about while wriitng
9) Come back later and read it and think "no one will like this - it's terrible"
10) Give up

But this time, as I am more motivated, I went an extra step and posted the first two chapters of my new WIP on Critique Circle.  And I got feedback like this:

"This premise has a lot of potential in my opinion, keep at it. Reading it was a lot of fun."
" Hello. I enjoyed reading through this story. The narration style was really fun and easy to establish a voice for the character in my head."
"Great story! I was really impressed with pretty much the whole thing: voice, writing, dialogue, story, etc."
" I certainly enjoy your writing style; you definitely have a good character being developed here!"

I don't think I have ever felt this positive about my writing.  Anyone else had a similar experience when they first realized they might actually be able to write?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,573 Posts
I recommend you have a read through www.nanowrimo.org.  The main principle there is to turn off your inner editor and just get some stuff down.  It sounds like when you do that, you have something worthwhile.  You need to do more of it and just finish something.


Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
700,000 words spread across 7 novels, 3 novellas and several shorter pieces, and I still realize I might be able to write just about every three months. In fact, the other day, I read a review of my latest novella and tears came to my eyes as I realized that maybe I don't suck after all.

We all have crises of confidence. The trick is to just keep plugging through them and finish the damned book, no matter how bad you think it might be. The next one will be better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
888 Posts
AndreSanThomas said:
The main principle there is to turn off your inner editor and just get some stuff down.
This is the best tip for productivity I've ever been taught. At university my tutors always said to me "A page of garbage is still garbage that can be edited -- a page of nothing is a page of nothing".
I find a lot of my best work is stuff that I've pounded out without any consideration for how nice it sounds or how appropriately I'm formatting it. If you can get caught up in the scene you're writing, chances are a bunch of your readers will too. My general litmus test for whether what I've written is any good or not is to see if reading through it engages me and makes me want to read more. It could be bogged down with all the formatting errors and clunky sentences in the world, but if there's a good story buried beneath those then you have nothing that can't be fixed with a few editing passes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the thoughts everyone.  I think hearing that it doesn't suck will be the impetus to actually finish instead of abandoning it. 
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top