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Hi! I'm new here, but I was just curious if others had the same hard time that I had telling friends you wanted a Kindle, or that you were getting one. I was sitting at lunch with co-workers, telling them how excited I was about this new product a while back and how great it was...and I wanted one. Not one single person was enthusiastic. But I don't care! I still wanted my Kindle.  8)

Anyone else have this experience? They said things like

-It's not the SAME as reading a real book. (Duh!)
- But you can't share it with friends. (This is true but I don't share my books because people don't give them back!)
- It doesn't have that paper smell.
-You can't hold it and flip the pages of paper.
-You can't highlight (wrong, of course).

I remember being so discouraged that day after work, but I wasn't dissuaded because I realized all those people sitting around at work don't read more than one book a year. They had said as much last year, and they couldn't believe how much I read, so I think that non-readers don't understand and don't have a need to store and carry and easily hold a book in your hand. I hate trying to keep a huge hardback or paperback open on my lap in bed....

Anyone else have these reactions?  ???
 

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Well, you are in the right place now!  We all understand here.  We are Kindle obsessed and proud of it ;D  I really think non-readers could never understand the allure of the Kindle.
 

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I am getting tired of people who are readers and say, "I don't do ebooks." What kind of a stupid statement is that? Trouble is, I've heard it more than once.

L
 

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I just think they either don't get it, or are too jealous to admit they really want one!
My husband who has been making fun of how obsessed I am with this thing, is now getting the NYTimes on it, and didn't even question my thoughts on getting the Kindle 2 (I think he figures if I do, he can take over my K1!!) but he'd never admit it out loud!! :)
 

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A lot of people I know are either jealous, think it's cool but not for them (which makes sense -  if you're not a reader, it's probably not for you), or they think it's a stupid expense.

I get a lot of my books from book swap sites, but even that's not free.  There's the initial cost of the first book I swapped, and then even if I'm just going back and forth, swapping books I've received from swaps, each one costs around $3 for shipping.  So to me, the Kindle becomes worth it if I'm averaging less than $3 for books.  I received my Kindle as a Christmas gift, but I'm still counting the cost in the price average.  Obviously, having just gotten the Kindle, counting only the books I've read, not the ones that I've downloaded and are waiting for me, my average is high.  About $40 too high.  But I have a huge backlog of free books to read, books I could have read on my computer, but I know from experience that I never actually do that - I just plan to, so the average will go down.  And I do buy some new releases.  These are books I wouldn't get for months on a book swap site, so the additional cost suddenly doesn't seem that bad.

Of course, I can't explain this to the naysayers.  But when I hear how they got stuck on public transportation and finished their book and had nothing to do, I just smile and hold my Kindle a little bit tighter.
 

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My daughter, an AVID, AVID reader HATES my Kindle.  I told her (kiddingly) that she hates it because it has replaced her.  My sister hates it as well...good; then I know that they will both keep their mitts off it and it will be safe from harm.  Those are the only two...everyone else loooooooves it.  My cousin returned her Sony after seeing my K and is on the wait list for it.
 

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I get much the same response from friends and family, some are readers, some not so much.  Most don't yet appreciate the convenience factor because they are stymied by the thought of the initial cost - "but you can get books for free at the library". 
However, I'm used to this.  I'm a vintage and modern fountain pen user/accumulator/restorer and if you think you get trouble about your Kindle, think about explaining why you spent a few hundred dollars "on a pen????" - the Kindle argument is easy by comparison!
 

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I'm a librarian and I get mixed reactions at work.  Most think it's "interesting" and like the idea of having lots of books at their fingertips, but most say "I can get my books free HERE!"  That's true, and my budget has taken a hit.  OTOH, my aging eyes can read much easier with the Kindle and makes reading fun again.  For years, reading has been a chore for me. 

And the return of the love of reading makes it all worth it to me. 

Each person has to find out what's most important to them.  :) 
 

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The "I love REAL books too much to ever use something like the Kindle" comment is the one that gets me. Of course, it usually comes from someone who has never even held a Kindle, let alone tried one for a few days. It bugs me because it implies that those of us who do use an e-reader don't love books as much as the speaker does. Yeah, right.

Partial list of responses:

1-Kindle is much more convenient than a DTB in lots of situations such as dr's offices, travel, and being on the bus when you finish one book and want to start another (as an earlier poster noted)
2-Kindle is MUCH easier to use for those of us with eye, hand, arm, or other problems.
3-It's not an either/or choice! I can still inhale book dust any time I want. When we get our Kindle, we don't have to sign a pledge never to read a paper book again. So we are not really missing out on anything.
4-As an e-reading friend said recently, "Yeah, I like the way books smell. But I'd rather read them than smell them."
 

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To those who don't understand the "I love real books too much" argument, I do understand it because I feel that way.

Now, I do have a Kindle, and I do use it.  But so far, it still hasn't replaced the experience of holding a book in my hands.  I honestly am a book lover.  I don't just mean that I love the words, but I love the books themselves.  I cannot explain it. 

That is not to say I don't like my Kindle; I do.  I plan on continuing to use it.  The main thing it helps me with right now is room.  As I have said before, I have a baby on the way, and my office (which had all of my books) is being converted into a nursery.  I had to go from three book cases overflowing with books to only one.  In this way, the Kindle allows me to have many books that don't take up room.  If I ever get a bigger house, however, I may very well go back to regular books, but that is down the road. 

There are benefits to both regular books and e-books.  I honestly don't see e-books ever fully replacing regular ones.  I could be wrong, though.
 

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I must say my friends who are readers have looked into buying an e reader. One actually got her K1 before the Oprah endorsement. I didn't order mine until last week, but I go and visit my wonderful, generous friend  :D once a week to use her Kindle.  My daughter tried to get me to buy a Sony over the holidays and I told her is was a Kindle or nothing.................hence I am in line waiting ever so patiently for it to arrive. I think once she gets a look at it, she too will want one but she will just have to wait in line like I did.

23 minutes and counting til the big announcement..................................
 

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I can understand the "I like real books" arguments.

I had a rocketbook ebook reader and HATED it. I figured all ebook readers were like that so I ignored the kindle until I saw a Sony ebook reader at Target. Playing with the Sony sold me on the kindle!

Uptil then I told friends that ebook readers weren't for real readers but for gadget freaks. I honestly didn't think you could 'zone out' on a kindle..boy was I wrong!

So while you can't force someone to like kindles, you can let some of those 'not a real book' complainers try it out for a bit. They might get the bug like I did!
 

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mwvickers said:
To those who don't understand the "I love real books too much" argument, I do understand it because I feel that way.

Now, I do have a Kindle, and I do use it. But so far, it still hasn't replaced the experience of holding a book in my hands. I honestly am a book lover. I don't just mean that I love the words, but I love the books themselves. I cannot explain it.
I totally get that, mwvickers, and if my previous post came across as too flip towards that point of view, I appologize. Nobody is campaigning to do away with paper books, though. Many of us still have stacks of them in our homes (and wouldn't think of getting rid of them). We can still enjoy the experience of turning an actual paper page or watching a book fall open to a favorite passage. Although I must say, I am fast developing a similar affection for the little pause while the Kindle brings up the spot where I stopped reading, and for the small, easy movement of one thumb that brings up a whole new page, and for the feel and smell of the leather cover on my Kindle. (I can't afford leather-bound paper books!) Kindle vs. paper isn't a strict either:eek:r proposition, and isn't that a wonderful thing? :)
 

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Most of the reaction I've had from friends hasn't been negative so much as surprised that I would be a Kindle reader. I guess they thought that, knowing I was an avid book lover, I was therefor some kind of Luddite or would consider the Kindle experience a bastardization of reading. (I'm a music lover, too, which is why I love my iPod, even if I still go to live performances whenever I can.)

When it comes to general fiction and nonfiction, I'm getting to where I'd rather read that on the Kindle, if given a choice. But other kinds of nonfictin books, particularly if they include sidebar boxes, tables, or particularly formatted sections, I still find it easier to read in hardback. For example: I read Mark Bittman's most recent book "Food Matters" on my Kindle. Most of the text was fine, once I figured out that repeated sentences or slightly out-of-context sentences between some of the paragraphs reflected pullquotes or annotations that, sure enough, in the hard back are printed in the margins in green. Most tables and graphs are hard to follow, and sidebar boxes sometimes appear in the middle of a sentence, but without evidence that they're anything other than part of the main flow of text.

Plus, the end of the book is a cookbook with recipes. These mostly formatted just fine except I found it hard to "page through" multiple pages to follow a recipe, and discovered a new-found appreciation for cookbooks that make an effort to publish recipes on a single page or across a spread -- so you can look back at the ingredients list as you read through the steps, or refer back to a previous step to make sure you didn't miss something earlier.

So, having discovered one instance of where I preferred physical books to an ebook, I ended up buying the hard copy of "Food Matters." And just to spread the wealth around, since I'd bought the Kindle version obviously from Amazon, I bought the hard copy version from B&N, which offers same day delivery here in New York City.

On the other hand, I received several (hard copy) books for Christmas, and am looking forward to reading them, but there's a part of me that's thinking, "Oh, that will be good...but I kind of wish I had it on my Kindle instead!"
 
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