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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A new magazine has just been launched aimed at Indie authors and their readers! There's some great articles and resources for writers. I think it looks REALLY good and the pilot is free.

http://www.indie-book-bargains.co.uk/indie-scene-magazine/

Rather excitingly my book Mask of the Macabre has been featured as a new release with a review!
 
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Damnit, David! Here I was all ready to slam yet another pub trying to make money off of indies, and you have to post a link to something that actually looks interesting. Geesh!  ;D ;D

That's a very nicely done publication. Will be interesting to see where it goes.
 

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That does look good.

What puzzles me is that so many book blogs and magazines lump writers and readers into the same target market.

While I realized that writers are also readers, why would someone who is 'just' a reader care about articles about self-publishing or the unimaginable hardship of being a writer?
Sites like that make me suspect that their prime audience are other writers, so we end up advertising our work to each other :)


 
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Quiss said:
That does look good.

What puzzles me is that so many book blogs and magazines lump writers and readers into the same target market.

While I realized that writers are also readers, why would someone who is 'just' a reader care about articles about self-publishing or the unimaginable hardship of being a writer?
Sites like that make me suspect that their prime audience are other writers, so we end up advertising our work to each other :)
In general, I agree with you. Thus my initial knee-jerk reaction. From looking through this issue, I get the impression that the target demographic is the "hard core" indie fan, not the general reader. It's catering specifically to people who look for indie books, much like those pubs that cater to people interested specifically in indie music. You are correct that this pub would be of no interest to the casual reader. But I also think they know that. They appear to be targeting those readers who are involved and interested in the indie community.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think that's the impression I got too. The indie market has a really good following and I know several people who now only read Indie books because the quality, they say, is comparable to trad published stuff but cheaper and with a wider variety. This publication looks to be targetting those guys, i think.
 

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Actually, we're very much interested in the casual reader. That is why the publication opens with an article on why readers should give indie books a try, goes on to explain the many different ways to read an eBook, and is stuffed with short stories and reviews.

The material for writers, mostly found nearer the back, is there because such a majority of indie readers are authors themselves and we need to keep them interested, as they're the ones who'll promote the magazine with the most passion.

Our advertising campaign is very much aimed at getting readers to try Indie books for the first time. For example, see:
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.430973283652833.100324.348681568548672&type=3

Indies authors promote to other Indies too much and it's getting stagnant. That's why we've produced a publication that shows Indies in a positive, professional light, to help combat the unhelpful stereotype that we're all rubbish and lazy.
 

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Quiss said:
That does look good.

What puzzles me is that so many book blogs and magazines lump writers and readers into the same target market.

While I realized that writers are also readers, why would someone who is 'just' a reader care about articles about self-publishing or the unimaginable hardship of being a writer?
Sites like that make me suspect that their prime audience are other writers, so we end up advertising our work to each other :)
As a reader, I don't see much point in buying that magazine. No offense but it's either for writers or for readers. Why? Because it's 2 different markets with 2 different needs. It is exactly the reason why Amazon won and other didn't. They have customers as their main target and don't try to cram readers and writers into same site. That's why they own the market now. If you release a magazine, do it for one or the other. Authors need magazines that have audience of readers. Then mags will sell ads. Because there will be a chance to reach readers. And it doesn't mean authors won't come to read the magazine. But when you're promoting stuff, one message for one target audience will be more helpful when growing audience.

Really hope it works out for the mag, another outlet for authors to have their books would be great. Congratulations on starting and good luck!
 

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You're getting fifty pages for free. What does it matter if only thirty of them are aimed at readers? It's not as though you're paying for the extra content.

On the cover - seven articles aimed at the reader, two aimed at the author.

Six free short stores are six free short stories, whether they are followed by tips on using a spell checker or not.

We did a lot of research before producing the magazine and, whilst certain individuals might not 'see much' point in picking up pages and pages aimed at them, because there also happens to be content aimed at others, the vast majority of people are more open minded.
 
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Rosen Trevithick said:
Actually, we're very much interested in the casual reader. That is why the publication opens with an article on why readers should give indie books a try, goes on to explain the many different ways to read an eBook, and is stuffed with short stories and reviews.
I appreciate that goal, but there is the old saying that one cannot serve two masters. You also risk what is referrred to as "mission creep" which can dilute your brand. I worry that if you think you are going to attact casual readers by including a lot of content on how to self publish, you will be sorely disappointed.

Last year, I launched the eFestival of Words, which has a very similar goal of promoting indie and small press ebooks to casual readers (and by the way, consider this an invitation to participate this year if you are interested). One of the things we did was make sure that all of our content was READER focused. No workshops on how to self publish or anything like that. We had a few general craft workshops (how to write a fight scene, world building, etc). But all of the panel discussions were reader focused. What surprised me was the feedback I got from attendees. They appreciated the focus on THEM. Many folks specifically mentioned that they enjoyed the festival because it didn't feel like a trade show with a bunch of people talking shop or trying to "recruit." The general vibe was that, too often, indies try to "force" casual readers to accept them...sort of like the annoying relative who is a born-again Christian and just has to "share the good news of Jesus!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!" whether you want to hear it or not. ::) ;D

My point is that you look like you have a great thing started. Be wary of mission creep and trying to appeal to soo many different groups that you wind up appealing to nobody.
 
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Rosen Trevithick said:
You're getting fifty pages for free. What does it matter if only thirty of them are aimed at readers? It's not as though you're paying for the extra content.
*sigh* And YEP, this is my concern. THIS ATTITUDE is going to destroy the publication. It makes it obvious that you don't "get" what casual readers are looking for and think you know what is best for them.
 

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Bards and Sages (Julie) said:
My point is that you look like you have a great thing started. Be wary of mission creep and trying to appeal to soo many different groups that you wind up appealing to nobody.
The tricky bit would be content, though. What articles would you present to a reader? They already know how to read. You can only write so much about eReaders and ergonomical reading positions when reading in bed :)
Whereas there is no end to material you can present to writers.

The magazine can't be JUST ads and short stories. (well, I suppose, it could be mainly short stories. I can see the appeal in that. Or even "sample" chapters of full-length novels. Yeah, that's it. Sign me up!)

ETA: and excerpts from graphic novels! That'd be cool, too. Poetry would work, as well. From a few posts I've seen there are not a lot of way for poets to gain visibility in the e-book market.
 

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It's a common misconception that authors should not disagree with readers.

At the end of the day, those who want to read the publication will read and enjoy it. Those who don't, don't have to read it.

It's a terrific publication from start to finish. I'm very proud of it and so should the authors who contributed.

I don't pretend to speak for casual readers everywhere, and neither should you.

Now, I'm not getting drawn into a pointless row. I just popped in to say 'hello'.
 

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Rosen Trevithick said:
You're getting fifty pages for free. What does it matter if only thirty of them are aimed at readers? It's not as though you're paying for the extra content.

On the cover - seven articles aimed at the reader, two aimed at the author.

Six free short stores are six free short stories, whether they are followed by tips on using a spell checker or not.

We did a lot of research before producing the magazine and, whilst certain individuals might not 'see much' point in picking up pages and pages aimed at them, because there also happens to be content aimed at others, the vast majority of people are more open minded.
Rosen, I'm trying to help you grow your business. Fundamental rule of business is to have one target market and one target message. Then it's easier to grow. If you narrow down to readers you win because you get the audience authors want. This means you will get authors buying the magazine either way probably PLUS you will be able to raise your prices for ads as quality of your magazine is good and the promotions work well for authors.

And then you can always do a spin off of your magazine for authors. Amazon didn't build itself into huge company in ecommerce by going after all market at once, it started as book seller, gained customers and trust and their credit card numbers and when the time came they expanded into all markets and now is a giant shop.

You can take offense or learn but truth is truth. I don't mean bad to your biz..
 

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Quiss said:
The tricky bit would be content, though. What articles would you present to a reader? They already know how to read. You can only write so much about eReaders and ergonomical reading positions when reading in bed :)
We are appealing to readers by giving them something to read. The magazine is packed with short stories but, we know that people like longer reads too, so we've included many articles about finding good books.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
What about this concept?

Just read the magazine and enjoy it for what it is? Entertaining, interesting and full of books. Now whether your a reader OR a writer we all love books don't we?
 
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Rosen Trevithick said:
It's a common misconception that authors should not disagree with readers.
Stop. Just...stop.

This is not about authors disagreeing with readers. This is about potential business partners discussing target markets and demographics. Nobody here has attacked you. People have asked legitimate questions and voiced legitimate concerns regarding the BUSINESS of your publication. If you are going to get this defensive over simple questions, I hate to think how you will deal with a client or subscriber when a real problem comes up.

Everything about your response reinforces the negative stereotypes of indies. If the goal is to promote indies in a positive light, you are doing a poor job of it.

And remember, YOU decided to join the conversation. Don't pretend you are being attacked.
 

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RBC said:
Rosen, I'm trying to help you grow your business. Fundamental rule of business is to have one target market and one target message. Then it's easier to grow. If you narrow down to readers you win because you get the audience authors want. This means you will get authors buying the magazine either way probably PLUS you will be able to raise your prices for ads as quality of your magazine is good and the promotions work well for authors.

And then you can always do a spin off of your magazine for authors. Amazon didn't build itself into huge company in ecommerce by going after all market at once, it started as book seller, gained customers and trust and their credit card numbers and when the time came they expanded into all markets and now is a giant shop.

You can take offense or learn but truth is truth. I don't mean bad to your biz..
Well, the purpose of the pilot issue is to collect feedback, so thank you. I can see that there may be merits to separating readers and authors but I don't think you can go so far as to say that there's no point downloading a free magazine because you only make up a part of its target audience.
 
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