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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Has anybody had any experience with Next Chapter? If so, what's the good, bad, and ugly?

How about D2D's new POD services? If you are knowledgeable about D2D, how do you think it compares with Lulu?

Thanks,

Robert
 

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No response???????????
Probably because no one has even heard of it. Like, it's not even findable on a Google search for "Chapter by Chapter" book printing which is a real bad sign.

D2D's service is probably fine because they do everything right in general, but why are you avoiding the elephant in the room? Use KDP Print for Amazon, or Ingram for everything else (or everything including Amazon.) It's highly likely and often known that everyone is pretty much using Ingram to do the actual printing anyway, including Amazon at times. So your question should really start with an explanation of why you can't or won't use those better/faster/cheaper options. Because you're just looking for the best of inferior choices.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Another author that I met on Facebook recommended that I switch from D2D to Next Chapter. The link is: Next Chapter It has a sizable Twitter following, but I'd never heard of it before either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Possibly because no one has heard of it. I know I haven't. As far as I know Lulu doesn't have a very good name among self publishers as they are more like a vanity publisher than a self publishing outlet.
The paperback through Lulu is very high quality, but sales suck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Another author that I met on Facebook recommended that I switch from D2D to Next Chapter. The link is: Next Chapter It has a sizable Twitter following, but I'd never heard of it before either.
It also produces audio books.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sales with D2D have been slow. Since this company was recommended by an author FB friend, I decided to check it out and hope that someone here had some experience with Next Chapter (and D2D POD). Thanks
 

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Another author that I met on Facebook recommended that I switch from D2D to Next Chapter. The link is: Next Chapter It has a sizable Twitter following, but I'd never heard of it before either.
Ah, had the name wrong. For a "publisher" that prides themselves on "transparency" their Web site is woefully opaque about their business. From what I can tell, they are not a competitor to D2D. I expect they will charge you for the various services they offer, and further expect they will take a cut of sales. They also appear to do some level of gatekeeping (but that's often a front in vanity publishing schemes and they'll accept anything with a checkbook attached.) In short, the fact that they're hiding the nuts and bolts of their business while claiming not to should be a red flag.

The few user comments that showed up in a cursory google search were complaints about features of their platform like audiobooks and lack of control over one's content.

In 2014 they did a indigogo fundraiser that had, no kidding, one backer.
 
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My guess is, if they were a real "thing" for self publishers, there'd be tons of us talking about it. So, probably not worth your time or money.

As to D2D POD, everyone that I know of thinks it's fine. It's kind of new, so there really isn't much of a track record for how sales go. I think D2D itself is fine to deal with, but if sales are what's needed, then learning to do better ads will be the better choice than expecting some other company to do the work for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I'm broke (retired and on social security), so the only marketing I've done is via Facebook posts (free) and Tweets (free). My book was accepted by BookBub, but it wanted $1500 or so if my memory is correct. Do you recommend a particular very low cost promotion service? Thanks
 

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I'm broke (retired and on social security), so the only marketing I've don't is via Facebook posts (free) and Tweets (free). My book was accepted by BookBub, but it wanted $1500 or so if my memory is correct. Do you recommend a particular very low cost promotion service? Thanks
Very low cost promotion sites are low cost because they produce poor results. If they did better, they'd charge more. It's self-balancing and generally balances as a level where the typical advertiser loses money because demand outweighs supply.

In general, you'll want/need a long series in a popular genre with proven good readthrough before any promotion regardless of cost will be effective. Anything less will be throwing money away. From what I can tell all you've got is a first book in an incomplete/abandoned series. This will be a hard sell as presented, and won't typically convert well which will increase PPC ad costs.
 
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I'm broke (retired and on social security), so the only marketing I've done is via Facebook posts (free) and Tweets (free). My book was accepted by BookBub, but it wanted $1500 or so if my memory is correct. Do you recommend a particular very low cost promotion service? Thanks
I can't imagine why you applied for a Bookbub deal, if you couldn't afford to pay for it. People wait years for a Bookbub deal and get turned down time and time again. I hope you let them know so they weren't holding the space for you.

Robert, with all due respect, you've been trying to sell this one book for years now, almost 4 in fact, and it is marked as number one of a series. People get very niggly when they read a number one and find it is the only one. Where are the rest? People want series or at least more than one book. Your book has some good ratings so it must be good and saleable, but readers will see that this first book in the series was published nearly four years ago and no sign of another. They decide it's not worth starting a series if there are no more. The same goes for standalones; they read a book, like it, look for more. If there are no more, they toddle off after another author.

You would be wasting your limited funds by advertising this book anywhere. You should be getting on and writing some more of this series, at least three, so there is read through. That is where the money is in a series - read through.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've seen so many authors write a series, prob pay bunches for ads, then go down. I felt that unless this first book didn't take off big time, that it would be a waste of money to pay for a cover and have the next one professionally edited. My traditional small press that originally paid for everything, including sending paperbacks to potential reviewers, it went defunct and now only publishes a magazine. It never did much promotion, but at least I didn't spend any money, which I don't have anyway. I've got the sequel on my hard drive but I can't afford to move forward unless I go with something different, like Next Chapter which promises a lot but may not deliver.
 

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You don't need to do all the stuff they did. And probably shouldn't bother. But if you don't write and publish the others, the first one, as others said, don't tend to do much. I delayed writing the follow up books in my series, and it wasn't until I got around to publishing three and four that anything started to happen.
 

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I've seen so many authors write a series, prob pay bunches for ads, then go down. I felt that unless this first book didn't take off big time, that it would be a waste of money to pay for a cover and have the next one professionally edited. My traditional small press that originally paid for everything, including sending paperbacks to potential reviewers, it went defunct and now only publishes a magazine. It never did much promotion, but at least I didn't spend any money, which I don't have anyway. I've got the sequel on my hard drive but I can't afford to move forward unless I go with something different, like Next Chapter which promises a lot but may not deliver.
You could get a premade cover (or see if your designer will give a deal on a second if you just make a few tweaks) and just a proofread instead of a full edit. Do a few editing passes yourself then have them give it a final go over for errors and typos you missed. A way you can build up your catalog quick is find premade covers you like on sale and write the story to the cover. Inspiration and cheap cover in one.
 

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I've seen so many authors write a series, prob pay bunches for ads, then go down. I felt that unless this first book didn't take off big time, that it would be a waste of money to pay for a cover and have the next one professionally edited. My traditional small press that originally paid for everything, including sending paperbacks to potential reviewers, it went defunct and now only publishes a magazine. It never did much promotion, but at least I didn't spend any money, which I don't have anyway. I've got the sequel on my hard drive but I can't afford to move forward unless I go with something different, like Next Chapter which promises a lot but may not deliver.
It sounds like your situation is such that you should be searching for a new trade publisher. That's perfectly fine. Self-publishing isn't for everyone. There are costs that you can't avoid either in dollars, time, or learning new skills and it sounds like you aren't interested in paying those costs. So concentrate on the writing and find someone (if you can) willing to cover the costs.
 

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I've seen so many authors write a series, prob pay bunches for ads, then go down. I felt that unless this first book didn't take off big time, that it would be a waste of money to pay for a cover and have the next one professionally edited. My traditional small press that originally paid for everything, including sending paperbacks to potential reviewers, it went defunct and now only publishes a magazine. It never did much promotion, but at least I didn't spend any money, which I don't have anyway. I've got the sequel on my hard drive but I can't afford to move forward unless I go with something different, like Next Chapter which promises a lot but may not deliver.
As I said, standalone books don't work alone nowadays, especially since yours has No.1 in a series marked on it. Imagine how disappointed readers will be to find there are no more. And it was published four years ago.

Write a couple more. You've got nothing to lose except time, which you seem to have in abundance, but while you keep pushing this first one, you are beginning to look desperate, Robert, and that won't help you at all.

You had some good reviews on this book, even in Publishers' Weekly, I seem to remember. Do you have a mailing list? If not, start one. Website? Blog? All these things help to get you noticed, but keeping on pushing the same four year old book will get you the wrong sort of notice.

As said, either look for another small press (I'm sure there are lots of them about) or find a cheap premade cover. Or, you can look through the stock photo sites and perhaps find one that fits as it is and all you need do is put the titles on. You might have to change the cover on your first one to match, but it could do with a bit of refreshment anyway after all this time. Have a look on fiver or upworks, see if there are any cheap editors or proofreaders on there.

And ask yourself why you are writing. If it's for money, you need to get stuck in. If it's a hobby, you certainly have nothing to lose by keeping on. But don't try to advertise until you've got more books.
 
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