Kindle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 67 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never read his books (planning on it though). But those who actually have read, what do you think? Why do you think he is so successful? Is it his writing, stories, marketing or all of the above?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,898 Posts
I haven't read his fiction, only his non-fiction book on how to sell fiction books. The non-fiction book didn't really do it for me. One assumes the fiction will read a lot different, however.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,676 Posts
I read the sample of Saving Rachel and really enjoyed it. It reminded me of the old Shell Scott books by Richard S. Prather. When I get a little caught up in my reading, I'll be downloading and finishing that one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
I've read Follow the Stone and Vegas Moon and found both to be entertaining and well written.
I read them back in April so don't remember much detail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
993 Posts
I've read his nonfiction book. I'm not sure I'd enjoy his fiction. But the point he made in his nonfiction book, is that if I don't like it, that's fine, because I'm not his target audience. This is one of (several) big take-aways from his book. It is futile to look at his writing, his plots, his characters, even his price point, and think that if you just copy that you will copy his success. His success comes from knowing his audience, targeting them powerfully, and ignoring everything else as irrelevant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tara Maya said:
I've read his nonfiction book. I'm not sure I'd enjoy his fiction. But the point he made in his nonfiction book, is that if I don't like it, that's fine, because I'm not his target audience. This is one of (several) big take-aways from his book. It is futile to look at his writing, his plots, his characters, even his price point, and think that if you just copy that you will copy his success. His success comes from knowing his audience, targeting them powerfully, and ignoring everything else as irrelevant.
Interesting. It is hard though to ignore everything else and filter out only relevant stuff. But I bet that's the way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
993 Posts
Aloysa said:
Interesting. It is hard though to ignore everything else and filter out only relevant stuff. But I bet that's the way to go.
I agree. The mere thought of a negative review, for instance, brings out the people-pleaser in me. But you can't please everyone; it's one of the harder aspects of writing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
John Locke has a marketing background as well and used this to good effect in promoting his books. I haven't read any of his novels but from reader feedback, they seem to be entertaining and well-written, which is always a big help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I do believe in the right timing and luck. Combined with a good writing of course.  ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,363 Posts
Tara Maya said:
I've read his nonfiction book. I'm not sure I'd enjoy his fiction. But the point he made in his nonfiction book, is that if I don't like it, that's fine, because I'm not his target audience. This is one of (several) big take-aways from his book. It is futile to look at his writing, his plots, his characters, even his price point, and think that if you just copy that you will copy his success. His success comes from knowing his audience, targeting them powerfully, and ignoring everything else as irrelevant.
This is pretty much the correct answer. You can't please everyone; it's just not going to happen. So with that thought in mind, it's probably best to figure out who your target audience is and just concentrate on pleasing them :)

Sandy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
I read the nonfiction first.  Thought he said the same thing over and over, but I learned a lot.

Then I purchased the first Donovan Creed.  Thought it was good.  Then the next, not quite as good.  They have been going downhill ever since.  The first one was plausible, if farfetched.  Since then, not so much... and some of it is just weird, like he ran out of story so he just started throwing stuff at it.

I love that he says if you don't love his book, you simply aren't his market.  That puts the responsibility of liking his writing on you, not on him.  From the very start you are programmed to try really hard to like his writing, to be part of the 'in' crowd.  He even has a name for it OOU.  

Marketing genius.  Yep.  

Great writer, maybe not -- but then, he says that too, which makes you want to like his writing even more.   :p

Sheila
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,678 Posts
Aloysa said:
I do believe in the right timing and luck. Combined with a good writing of course. ;D
I haven't read him yet, but I intend to. There are times when a light, fast, and entertaining read is just the ticket. And from what I hear about Locke that's what he tries to give his readers. Fair enough.

And, yes, to whoever said he is a marketing genius. The guy knows what he's about...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
I read his book about all his sales and I liked it for the most part. I think part of his success is that he has a marketing background, and I suspect because of that he had a lot of contacts who would already buy his book to begin with. Plus he has many books to offer all at once. I can only think that the combination of this, plus he is probably at least a decent writer, so this just got the ball rolling for him. Do I think the same methods will work for everyone....no. Overall, I found him hard not to like, which is probably another reason why he is so popular. 
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I've read his non-fiction book, which I thought was insightful at least. I like the practical business-oriented way he approaches it (which is exactly what many writer's won't like about him), although I get the impression he writes a draft in 8 weeks and then pays someone to edit it while he moves on to the next one. Which helps knock them out but bothers the purist in me. I'd rather sweat over a book for five years, get it perrrrfect and then lovingly call it my baby thereafter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
A draft in 8 weeks?! That is one writing terminator. And it makes me wonder if the quality suffers because of it tremendously. IMHO writing should be about quality and not quantity. I don't think that pumping out novels every two months contributes to his writing quality. But I’ve never read his books. I was not surprise to read that the quality of his books decline with each new book. I guess his success is mostly attributable to his marketing approach. But again I might be wrong since I have not read his books.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
I don't care for his books, downloaded Saving Rachel and it wasn't my cup of tea. I LOVED his non-fiction book though. He's a very smart business person who has applied his sales and marketing background to his writing. His books are his products, not his babies. He's not losing sleep over making them perfect, he's making them 'good enough' and that's just fine. Agree that there is an audience for what he writes and his talent lies in finding that audience, inviting them to read his stuff and keeping in touch so that he is an auto-buy for many when each new book comes out. There is nothing wrong with that, it's smart business, though it goes against many writers who approach their writing as more of a calling, looking to create quality over quantity. Fortunately, there is a market for all kinds of writing.
 
1 - 20 of 67 Posts
Top