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Discussion Starter #1
I have seen some incredible quilting's posted around here and it seems we have knitters as well.
Maybe you all could help me.

I am interested in learning to sew.
I just bought a Singer Machine and I am looking for the ONE BOOK and/or DVD (or one of each)
to use as an absolute beginner to self teach.

I am a handy person, used to be a woodworker, raised by an architect, have a lot of graphic/design
art type experience so this should be something I can self teach.
At least until I get the basics down then I might look for a local class.

Appreciate the help!
Eric
Still waiting for my Kindle....
 

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I'd say a local class is your best bet. There are certain things that are hard to see from a book or video. If you decide to try to get a start, a video will probably be better. I seem to remember that Singer has some videos on its site for various sewing techniques.
 

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Eric,

Where did you purchase your singer? A lot of times the places you purchase a sewing machine will have classes that you can take (usually one-on-one) to help you get familiar with your sewing maching.

Also if you have a Joann's in your neighborhood see if they have sewing classes.  You can also find beginning quilting classes, which are a great way to learn all kinds of sewing tips, at your local fabric stores/quilt shops.

enjoy your machine.

Theresam
 

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You should browse around your local fabric store - they usually have lots of instructional books, and also you could find a pattern you like and jump right in. All the patterns are rated for experience levels, and there are detailed instructions within each pattern. After you get your feet wet, a sewing class would help you fill in the blanks and show those techniques that are hard to get without demonstration.
 

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I agree with the others. I learned to sew back in the dark ages in a Home Ec class. Having someone demonstrate can really make a difference. Plus there are lots of tricks in sewing that you'll never learn from a book.

Like others said, Joann Fabrics might be a place to start. At our Joann's the have the projects hanging up so if you say, "Oh, I really like that fleece top!" or "Oh, look, a coat for the dog!" then you sign up for the class and get to work on a project you are interested in making. Once you get a few basics under your belt, reading a book on how to sew is going to make more sense.

L
 

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I agree with a local class. It is one thing to read a book or watch a DVD, nothing like hands on teaching.

Same thing in nursing school, you can read and study but until you start clinicals and get that hands on nursing it is a different experience all together. Injecting an orange is not like injecting a person I don't care how many times you do it. CPR on Annie is nothing like CPR on a person. Great to learn the technique but feels so different.
 

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Linda Cannon-Mott said:
I agree with a local class. It is one thing to read a book or watch a DVD, nothing like hands on teaching.

Same thing in nursing school, you can read and study but until you start clinicals and get that hands on nursing it is a different experience all together. Injecting an orange is not like injecting a person I don't care how many times you do it. CPR on Annie is nothing like CPR on a person. Great to learn the technique but feels so different.
Oh Linda, you do bring back memories. I remember injecting oranges, and especially hot dogs for intradermal injections...we had a bunch of bumpie hotdogs floating around the room and the comments that were flying around are unprintable here, LOL.

Yep, some things are best learned hands on if possible. Sewing is one of them. I learned when I was a kid watching my Mom and Grandma. Maybe a local community collage would have a class?
 

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Mollyb52 said:
Oh Linda, you do bring back memories. I remember injecting oranges, and especially hot dogs for intradermal injections...we had a bunch of bumpie hotdogs floating around the room and the comments that were flying around are unprintable here, LOL.

Yep, some things are best learned hands on if possible. Sewing is one of them. I learned when I was a kid watching my Mom and Grandma. Maybe a local community collage would have a class?
LOL Nursing school opens the door for many unprintable comments, doesn't it? ;D

As for sewing I took Home Ec and hated it. I paid a classmate $5 to put a zipper in for me and haven't sewn since.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone,

I will make a trip out today to B&N and one local sewing shop to see what I can find via books.
Still the way I tend to start things. I taught myself cabinetmaking starting with a book.

Be well,
Eric
 

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I didn't realize I had such a huge vocabulary of swear words till I started sewing, even now after I've gotten pretty good at it, the air often becomes blue while I'm doing it.
I sew for Barbie size dolls and those little seams and darts bring out the worst in me.
 

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ELDogStar said:
Thanks everyone,

I will make a trip out today to B&N and one local sewing shop to see what I can find via books.
Still the way I tend to start things. I taught myself cabinetmaking starting with a book.

Be well,
Eric
I hope you realize we will be expecting a fashion show when you are done....
 

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I agree with the previous post- it's a lot easier than it looks! If you don't already have a machine, often you get free lessons when you purchase one. I have the Readers Digest Complete Guide to Sewing, which is supposed to be an excellent resource... but I barely ever use it. I think it's heavy on the apparel type sewing.

What I DO use a lot is Bend the Rules Sewing, by Amy Karoll. It's an excellent book and has a variety of simple projects that are really wonderful.

You can see some projects that other people have made from the book here: http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=bend%20the%20rules%20sewing&w=all
 

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tessa said:
Eric

Its a lot easier than it looks.

Tessa

PS get a good stitch ripper
Unless of course your me and someone signed you up for the quilt block of the month club and you've never done a quilt in your life!! Talk about a whole new set of vocabulary words (and on sew days with my mom - I had to wait until she left the room for something or leave the room myself to use those words!!)

Also my first sewing machine (as an adult) did not sew a straight line. My mother kept telling me I just need to be patient I'll get there in my sewing (this was before the quilt class and we were sewing doll dresses). Then one day she needed mine because she didn't want to re thread hers for a different color and back again, I caught her causing at it LOL. It did not sew a straight line! Justified I promptly went out and bought a Bernina and never looked back (except to grump and wine that my points NEVER line up in my quilt block uggg ??? :() So I'm back to knitting and sewing doll cloths. No more quilts - bummer still have to do the center piece though..... :-\.

Theresam

edited to say: the seem ripper is my best friend!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Panjo said:
I agree with the previous post- it's a lot easier than it looks! If you don't already have a machine, often you get free lessons when you purchase one. I have the Readers Digest Complete Guide to Sewing, which is supposed to be an excellent resource... but I barely ever use it. I think it's heavy on the apparel type sewing.

What I DO use a lot is Bend the Rules Sewing, by Amy Karoll. It's an excellent book and has a variety of simple projects that are really wonderful.

You can see some projects that other people have made from the book here: http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=bend%20the%20rules%20sewing&w=all
FANTASTIC I put it on my Amazon wish list!
I do have a sewing machine I got a Singer (Ingenuity- 7436 model) from Costco.
More machine than I will ever need I am sure.
But it was a good deal and had a good reputation from the research I did.

Eric
 

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Eric,

Singer's and bernina's both have a great reputation. I went with bernina only because I liked my moms and has had hers since I was born. Let see that was 40 years ago. I think it's time she got a replacement  ::)

theresam
 

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Discussion Starter #18
bosslady said:
I hope you realize we will be expecting a fashion show when you are done....
HA HA or... El Oh El!

I am looking to shorten some pillow cases, hem some drapes and eventually make some drapes and some new 20" square throw pillow covers. Nothing dramatic. Maybe replace a zipper along the way. Plus I do want to make a hand "puppet" based on my dog. (I envision something on the Jim Henson side of puppetry.) But I think that will mostly be glue and hand sewing. I haven't even researched how to make that yet! Think I will just figure it out on my won from scratch.

I gotta say... I really like the people around here.
Thanks,
Eric
 

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Discussion Starter #20
KimmyA said:
I'm a beginning sewer myself. I have a book called Visual Sewing. A lot of sewing books have drawn pictures. In this one there are actual color photos and that helps. Sewing VISUAL Quick Tips (Teach Yourself VISUALLY Consumer)
Nice to meet ya!

I was just at B&N and saw the book you mentioned, I also just added it to my wish list as well. I did get one book today.
The Complete Photo Guide to Sewing
And it is by Singer Corp and it is an updated and expanded edition, just this year.
Looks very broad based and a complete overview of everything and with lots of photographs.

We shall see!
Eric
 
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