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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Looking through the list of events associated with the Las Vegas Libraries I noticed that something interesting. It was a photo of Overdrive's Digital BookMobile. Lucky for me, I noticed it the second to last day it was in town and I did check it out today. Seemed like an awesome way to introduce ebooks and ereaders to the general public.

There isn't much, but its was a good chance to get out of the house. When you first enter, there are two or three tvs describing the Overdrive program and how it works. Inside there are many computers where people can try out the overdrive program. Then towards the end there is mp3s and a Sony 505 out on display and for demo. The displayed devices are the one that are compatable with the program. Many of the people there asking questions (while I was messing around with the Sony 505) were asking about "Kindle VS. Sony" question. I kept my mouth shut except when I went to ask the female employee some questions. My biggest question had to do with the Kindle.

Question: Where does the Overdrive Digital BookMobile travel?
Answer: All across the US and Canada

Question: Do you think that Overdrive and the Kindle will be compatiable soon or at any point?
General Answer: Cannot say yes for sure...but the program has only been compatiable with the iPod since Nov 2008. So devices are still being added to the list.
(personal opinion: I think it depends on Amazon decision about DRM on the kindle. The ability to use Overdrive books with the Kindle would effect Amazon's sell on ebooks. Hopefully we wil be able to use the kindle with Overdrive.)

Link the Overdrive Digital BookMobile: http://www.digitalbookmobile.com/default.aspx
Link to the BookMobile schedule:http://www.digitalbookmobile.com/Calendar.aspx

NEXT STOPS:
Reno (NV) April 11
San Jose (CA) April 16
Saratoga (CA) April 17
Morgan Hill (CA) April 18
Windsor (CA) April 20

For those not familar with Overdrive...Its a program that you can download to your computer for free. Some libraries use the site to allow people to download content such as music, audiobooks, and ebooks. You check out content and it automatically deletes itself once it reaches its expiration date. Its just like another book or cd checked out of the library...minus the trip down the street/across town (varies with people)

My local library uses the program. I have downloaded it to my laptop, but haven't downloaded any content for use, yet. Some of the members of the forum use the program, if I remember correctly. What do you think about this tour, the program, or the Kindle's incompatiability with OD. Another thing, some of the people there asking about the Kindle seemed to be weighing between a Sony or a Kindle, the ability to download ebooks from the library seem to weigh a lot in the purchase. (Two people mentioned the cost of the ereaders themselves.) Do you think that the Kindle's inability to work with library ebooks will effect the sell of the Kindle Ereader itself? I see that Amazon could lose money if people could just check out ebooks from the library. Still I see Amazon losing money by not having the function on the kindle as people use it to weigh in their Ereader purchase. I don't know. Anyways I just would like to download ebooks from the library.

;D Vegas_Asian
 

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Psssst, as an FYI, I download and use Overdrive books from my local library on the Kindle.  And no, I don't strip the DRM, I just input the Kindle PID (there are lots of posts on how to do it out there, though the "official" instructions which used to be on MobileRead were taken down per the request of Amazon).

I can't wait until it comes here to Denver!  I'll answer those Sony v. Kindle and library questions  ;D
 

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Would a digital library have unlimited copies of a book to lend or would there be the same type of restrictions that physical library media have?  I could see that impacting Amazon's decision.  If there are the same restrictions there are the same reasons to choose to buy the book (waiting line for copies - want longer to read the book etc.).  Then allowing the Kindle to participate in a digital library service would be an advantage because you could sell more Kindles and have more potential customers for books.
 

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At my library (Fairfax County, VA), they have a number of "copies" of digital books to loan out.  I've had to be on a waiting list for digital books when I was reading them on my Palm T/X.

Betsy
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
PJ said:
Would a digital library have unlimited copies of a book to lend or would there be the same type of restrictions that physical library media have?
The digital library has a limit on how many books it has checked out. If all 'copies' are checked out you will be added to the waiting list. (from what I heard today) Its just like a regular phsyical book.

edit: Betsy, got to it.
 

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PJ said:
Would a digital library have unlimited copies of a book to lend or would there be the same type of restrictions that physical library media have? I could see that impacting Amazon's decision. If there are the same restrictions there are the same reasons to choose to buy the book (waiting line for copies - want longer to read the book etc.). Then allowing the Kindle to participate in a digital library service would be an advantage because you could sell more Kindles and have more potential customers for books.
The way the Overdrive system works with the Denver Public Library is they have a certain number of copies (I've seen as many as 5 on popular books like "Edgar Sawtelle"). The "check out" period is set in the DRM, and for DPL, it's 21 days. After that time, if you go to open the book, it tells you your subscription has expired. You can re-check it out if you want and it's available.

So far, have never had a book I wanted which was in .mobi format, not be available to check out, but part of that is they don't have a very big .mobi collection and not too many know how to adapt it for use on the Kindle.
 

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I use my library's OD audiobook system A LOT, but it only offers ebooks in Adobd PDF ebook format (no mobi format). One is supposed to be able to transfer these ebooks to a device, but although I have attempted this, I have not been successful. I've only been successful in getting Adobe ebooks on my computer & sitting at my computer to read a several-hundred-page book is not going to happen.

With the audio books, although the checked out book license will expire from your computer in however many days the library sets up, if you have transferred the book to an mp3 player, it will remain on the player forever until it is deleted.

I would expect that if one could transfer ebooks to a Kindle, it might work the same way. I do hope Kindle & Overdrive get something worked out. Apple & OD finally did for dl'ing audiobooks to ipods.

I have a 'small' book budget & would love to have the library as an ebook resource as well as the DTB resource.
 

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Do you think it would really effect Amazon's Kindle book sales that much? The Kansas City Public Library has Overdrive, but their selection isn't that large, so unless they start getting a greater selection, I wonder if it would. Of course, I don't know if there may be an Overdrive program that has more books than what the KC Library subscribes to. Jeni
 

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Many, many libraries are using Overdrive for their e-Book and audiobook offerings.  What I don't know is where they purchase their books from--a place like Amazon or the publisher?  Perhaps one of our member librarians can help us with that.

Betsy
 
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